Tag: pro-choice vaccines

What Are the Demands and Goals of the Anti-Vaccine Movement?

So what exactly do anti-vaccine folks want?

What are they trying to do?

Are they trying to scare parents away from getting vaccinating and protecting their kids, hoping to drag us back to the pre-vaccine era?

What Are the Demands and Goals of the Anti-Vaccine Movement?

Of course, some of the folks who are anti-vaccine don’t actually like to be called anti-vaccine. Instead, they prefer to say that they are pro-safe vaccines. So for them, it is rather obvious – they want safer vaccines without toxins.

Now, since vaccines are already safe and don’t contain any toxic ingredients, it would seem like their work is done already, right?

Another goal is having fewer vaccines on the immunization schedule. Jenny McCarthy often pushes the Turn Back the Clock immunization plan, wanting kids to only get vaccines that were on the 1983 immunization schedule, back when kids still died of meningitis, pneumonia, blood infections, severe dehydration, epiglottitis, and cancer from Hib, pneumococcal disease, rotavirus, hepatitis B, hepatitis A, chicken pox, HPV, and meningococcal disease, which are now vaccine preventable.

Other members of the anti-vaccine movement talk about vaccine choice. They want to be able to choose whether or not they should have to vaccinate their kids.

Again, done. No one is forcing parents to vaccinate their kids. We may not have a choice on whether or not your unvaccinated child gets sick and puts someone else at risk for getting a vaccine-preventable disease because they were too young to be vaccinated, had a medical exemption, or their vaccine didn’t work, but you can certainly make the choice to skip or delay any vaccines you want.

“I also warn them not to share their fears with their neighbors, because if too many people avoid the MMR, we’ll likely see the diseases increase significantly.”

Dr. Bob Sears in The Vaccine Book

What are other goals of the anti-vaccine movement?

Johns Hopkins Medicine, which includes the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System went out of their way to correct this anti-vaccine misinformation.
Johns Hopkins Medicine went out of their way to correct this anti-vaccine misinformation about shedding.

Have you heard about the anti-vaccine folks who want to quarantine all kids who have recently been vaccinated for at least six weeks? Why quarantine kids who have been vaccinated? They are worried about shedding

Would anyone go so far as wanting to ban vaccinations? Yup. So much for vaccine choice.

Some others want to rescind the 1986 National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act, which they think will help make it easier to sue vaccine manufacturers. That’s one of Andrew Wakefield‘s demands in his movie VAXXED. He and others never mention that if you are suing in civil court, then you must meet a higher burden of proof for vaccine injury than you do in Vaccine Court.

Remember when Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. thought he would be appointed to some special Trump commission on vaccines?

“We want safe vaccines, robust transparent science and an honest and independent regulatory agency focused narrowly on public health rather than industry profit.”

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. on Mercury, Vaccines and the CDC’s Worst Nightmare

Kennedy’s vaccine commission never happened, but that hasn’t stopped him from pushing for an independent regulatory agency.

I’m not sure who would run or be a part of Kennedy’s independent regulatory agency though, as he believes that “Congress, the regulatory agencies, FDA and CDC, the IOM, the NIH, the AAP, the science journals, the university science departments and the press” have all been compromised by Pharma.

Kennedy also wants thimerosal out of vaccines, which, as most people know, is already out of all vaccines on the immunization schedule, including about 100 million doses of flu shots this past year. But like others, he seems to be moving on to aluminum as his new target.

What else?

Fortunately, it is easy to see why the demands and goals of the modern anti-vaccine movement are dangerous, unethical, and unnecessary, and like parents who decide to skip or delay vaccines, will simply put us all at risk for more outbreaks of vaccine-preventable disease.

What to Know About the Demands and Goals of the Anti-Vaccine Movement

Whatever their demands and goals of the anti-vaccine movement, the effect is that they are scaring parents away from vaccinating and protecting their kids from life-threatening vaccine-preventable diseases for no good reason.

More on the Demands and Goals of the Anti-Vaccine Movement

What Is Vaccine Choice?

Have you heard about the idea of vaccine choice?

The “right to choose” is being pushed by anti-vaccine groups in many states because they think that laws mandating kids to have vaccines to go to daycare, school, and college violates their parental rights and civil liberties.

“Their claim that vaccines are 100% safe and effective for all people all of the time is not based in science and is not supported by facts or evidence, making it more of a religious belief than an adequate basis for their mandate argument.”

Texans for Vaccine Choice

And of course, they use a lot of anti-vaccine talking points to try and scare parents into believing them. Vaccines are safe and they work, but no one says that they are 100% safe or that they are 100% effective.

What Is Vaccine Choice?

Right away, you should see another big problem with the vaccine choice movement.

No one is forcing anyone to get vaccinated. Everyone has a choice. It’s just that some folks don’t like the consequences that come with that choice of not vaccinating their kids – having to home school their kids instead of going to a public or private school.

So basically, vaccine choice is just the anti-vaccine movement moving the goal posts yet again.

“If you ask a parent of an autistic child if they want the measles or the autism, we will stand in line for the f–king measles.”

Jenny McCarthy

Study after study showed that vaccines are not associated with autism and what did we get, measles outbreaks in unvaccinated kids.

What’s Missing In the Vaccine Choice Argument?

In addition to facts, one big thing that is missing from the vaccine choice argument is that by pushing the idea that unvaccinated kids should be allowed to skip or delay any or all vaccines without consequences, that takes away the choice for the rest of us who want to keep our kids protected from vaccine-preventable diseases.

Can’t we just vaccinate our kids?

Many children with cancer and other medical conditions benefit from herd immunity.
Many children with cancer and other medical conditions benefit from herd immunity. (CC BY 2.0)

We do!

But that doesn’t take away all of the risk if you don’t vaccinate your kids.

“…the increased risk of disease in the pediatric population, in part because of increasing rates of vaccine refusal and in some circumstances more rapid loss of immunity, increases potential exposure of immunodeficient children.”

Medical Advisory Committee of the Immune Deficiency Foundation

There are kids who are too young to be vaccinated or fully vaccinated, kids who can’t be vaccinated because of true medical vaccine exemptions, and folks whose vaccine didn’t work, after all, vaccines aren’t 100% effective.

The “choice” folks don’t talk about those things though.

Make an informed choice about vaccines before you think about leaving your child unvaccinated and unprotected.

What To Know About Vaccine Choice

Listen to anti-vaccine propaganda, skip or delay vaccines and leave your kids unprotected or do your research and understand that vaccines work and are safe and necessary and get them vaccinated and protected – that’s your vaccine choice.

More on Vaccine Choice

Who’s Who in the Anti-Vaccine Movement

No, this isn’t another article about Andy Wakefield or Jenny McCarthy.

Defining the Anti-Vaccine Movement

The great majority of people know that vaccine work and that they are safe and necessary.

And then there are the folks who don’t.

“The term movement as a description for vaccine deniers is also very misleading. A movement implies the image of a powerful, coordinated group, united by a shared collective identity.”

WHO on How to respond to vocal vaccine deniers in public

It is important to understand that this minority of people who do not believe in vaccines do not have uniform beliefs. Calling them a movement is simply for convenience, as a way to group them all together.

Who’s Who in the Anti-Vaccine Movement

So who are the different types of people that you might come across in various discussions about vaccines?

More importantly, why do you want to know?

You don’t want to think that everyone who questions the safety or efficacy of vaccines is totally anti-vaccine and is going to refuse some or all vaccines. Some of these parents really do just have questions, want to get educated, and may have just been scared by misinformation. On the other hand, others won’t change their minds no matter what new evidence you bring to the table or how long you talk.

“Although many may characterize all individuals who eschew vaccines as “anti-vaccine” or “vaccine deniers,” in reality there is a broad spectrum of individuals who choose not to have themselves or their children vaccinated.”

Tara C Smith on Vaccine Rejection and Hesitancy: A Review and Call to Action

However you characterize the groups, you will be much less frustrated when talking about vaccines if can quickly recognize if you are talking to someone who is:

  • a go along to get along immunization acceptor – this type of cautious acceptor understands and accepts that vaccines work and that they are safe and necessary, but still may have some doubts about one or more vaccines.
  • an immunization advocate – understands, accepts, and helps teach others that vaccines work and that they are safe and necessary.
  • a vaccine denier – someone who does not accept the process of vaccination while denying scientific evidence and employing rhetorical arguments to give the false appearance of legitimate debate. These are the vaccine rejectors who are “unyieldingly entrenched in their refusal to consider vaccine information.”
  • vaccine hesitant – usually a classic fence-sitter, who has doubts about whether vaccines are really safe or necessary or has simply been scared and influenced about something they read on the Internet. They may skip or delay some vaccines, but are typically willing to listen to why getting their child fully vaccinated is their best and safest option.
  • a vaccine refuser – doesn’t vaccinate their kids or themselves, but unlike the vaccine denier, probably doesn’t have very strong beliefs in conspiracy theories and may be willing to listen if you address their concerns about vaccines. They are also sometimes called the vaccine resistant. Often seem to put aside their beliefs against vaccines in special circumstances, like during outbreaks or other high risk situations.
  • a vaccine skeptic – this term is often misused, as classically, a vaccine skeptic would be defined as a person who has questions about vaccines, but then accepts that they are safe and necessary once they have examined all of the evidence. As a skeptic, they would also question all of the “science” of the anti-vaccine movement too, and would find it lacking. Folks who question vaccines, but then ignore all of the evidence that supports their safety and effectiveness are in denial – they are not vaccine skeptics.
  • a vocal vaccine denier – a vaccine denier who influences others, especially on the Internet.
  • one of the worrieds – often immunization acceptors who are still a little worried about vaccine side effects.

What about those who say that they are pro-safe vaccines or pro-choice about vaccines?

Don’t be fooled, these are simply anti-vaccine arguments of a vaccine denier or refuser.

Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carrey went on a mission to Green Our Vaccines in 2008.
Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carrey went on a mission to Green Our Vaccines in 2008. How would you classify them?

Still having trouble telling the groups apart?

Try asking the person you are talking to what would change their mind about vaccines.

Would new evidence work? Or would they dismiss any new evidence as being biased, just as they already dismiss all of the evidence that  so strongly supports that vaccines are safe and necessary?

It is important to identify who’s who, because while you will likely not change the mind of someone who is at the stage of being a vaccine denier, you have a much better chance to help the others get their kids vaccinated and protected.

What to Know About Defining the Anti-Vaccine Movement

The anti-vaccine movement includes a lot of different groups of people, from those who are simply hesitant because a friend or family member is scaring them on Facebook to the vocal vaccine denier, who probably wouldn’t even change their mind if they were bitten by a rabid dog.

More About Defining the Anti-Vaccine Movement