Category: Vaxopedia

Is a Crooked Face a Sign of a Vaccine Injury?

Have you heard of the Crooked theory?

Is something really wrong with these Hollywood stars?
Does Zach Braff really have a crooked face?

If you haven’t, when you get done learning about it, the name is going to seem very ironic…

“Why do babies have lopsided smiles? Why are so many people’s eyes misaligned? What started as a simple search to understand this phenomenon turned into a two-year quest that uncovered hidden links between our crooked faces and some of the most puzzling diseases of our time.

From autism to Alzheimer’s and from chronic fatigue syndrome to Crohn’s disease, Crooked methodically goes through the most recent scientific research and connects the dots from the outbreak of metallic medicine in 1800s England to the eruption of neurological and autoimmune disorders so many are suffering from today.

If the theories put forth in this book are true, the convergence of metals, microbes and medicine that started two hundred years ago may have set humanity on a path of suffering that could make the deadliest epidemics in history pale in comparison. Thankfully, for the millions who are afflicted, who may have found nothing to explain the cause of their suffering — these same theories could also illuminate the path to healing and recovery.”

Forrest Maready on Crooked: Man-Made Disease Explained

Spoiler Alert – The “theories” put forth in his book are not true.

Are you crooked?

Forrest Maready might get asked that a lot these days for actually trying to sell a self-published book pushing the idea that he knows what causes everything “from autism to Alzheimer’s and from chronic fatigue syndrome to Crohn’s disease.”

Of course, he thinks that it is vaccines and aluminum.

“And that’s what makes this even worse. Not only is the theory completely false, it’s not even original!.”

Were We Crooked?

It isn’t.

This “theory” of “his” has been well debunked, ironically, by Maready himself!

Doesn't it look like many of these football players from 1899 had crooked faces?
Doesn’t it look like many of these football players from 1899 had crooked faces?

As others have pointed out, Forrest Maready debunked his own book when he posted old photographs of football players, claiming it proved that vaccines caused chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

Not only did many of the football players from the late 18th and early 19th century who played without helmets go on to develop chronic traumatic encephalopathy, if they didn’t die on the field, as you can see, many also had crooked faces!

Crooked faces, brain damage because they didn't wear helmets, and death from now vaccine preventable diseases - life was tough in the old days.
Crooked faces, brain damage because they didn’t wear helmets, and death from now vaccine preventable diseases – life was tough in the old days.

As early as the 1920s, after first being noticed in boxers, it was quickly discovered that CTE could also occur in football players. And again, many of the folks in these pics have crooked faces!

“All people have asymmetric faces. When one looks closely, these differences become more apparent.”

AAP on Children with Facial Asymmetry

It is hopefully obvious that the crooked face theory is all about cherry picking and confirmation bias. And that some folks think that everything and anything is a vaccine injury.

That this appears to be a credible theory by anti-vaccine folks says a lot about the modern anti-vaccine movement and why some folks don’t vaccinate their kids.

Don’t believe it.

Vaccines are safe and necessary and won’t make your child’s face look crooked.

More on the Crooked Face Theory

 

Three Reasons to Skip a Flu Shot This Year

We sometimes hear that folks are going to skip their yearly flu vaccine because they don’t believe in flu shots, they never get sick, or they think that flu shots don’t work or are dangerous.

Some nurses and doctors are refusing to get a flu shot and have to wear masks at work.
Some nurses and doctors are refusing to get a flu shot and have to wear masks at work.

Of course, none of those are good reasons.

Three Reasons to Skip a Flu Shot This Year

Flu vaccines are safe and have many benefits, even if they aren’t any where near 100% effective.

So are there any legitimate reasons to skip a flu shot?

Of course.

In fact, three very good reasons to skip a flu shot include:

  1. being younger than 6 months of age
  2. having a severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose of flu vaccine or to any component of the flu vaccine
  3. and, uh…

Actually, although folks might have many of bad excuses, there are only two good reasons to skip a flu shot…

So, infants who aren’t old enough to be vaccinated yet, and anyone who has had a life-threatening reaction to a previous dose.

Additional precautions, but not true contraindications, do including having had Guillain-Barré syndrome <6 weeks after a previous dose of influenza vaccine and having a moderate or severe acute illness with or without fever when you are planning to get vaccinated.

What about egg allergies?

Even if you have had a severe reaction to eggs, you can still get a flu shot. Just get it get it in an inpatient or outpatient medical setting (such as a hospital, clinic, health department, or physician’s office), so that you can be supervised by a health care provider who is able to recognize and manage severe allergic reactions.

Bad Reasons to Skip a Flu Shot

Are you scared of shots? Flumist is back.

Are you skipping the flu shot because you never get sick? How lucky do you feel this year? Don’t continue to gamble that you won’t get the flu. Increase your chances of staying well by getting a flu shot, the best way to avoid the flu.

There aren’t any natural alternatives that work better, no matter how hard you want to believe that going to a chiropractor, using essential oils, or homeopathic remedies might be helpful.

The flu vaccine doesn’t weaken your immune system.

There are no hidden or harmful ingredients in flu vaccines.

The flu vaccine is not going to give you the flu.

And the flu is definitely not a mild disease! There were 176 pediatric flu deaths last flu season, and as in most years, most were unvaccinated.

Don’t wait. Get your flu shot.

More on Flu Vaccine Contraindications

Measles on a Plane, Train, and a Cruise Ship

What to most folks worry about when they go on a cruise?

That’s right. Norovirus…

While it isn’t as common as most folks think, norovirus is still often thought of as the cruise ship disease.

Measles on a Plane, Train, and a Cruise Ship

Not surprisingly, many of the same conditions that put you at risk for getting norovirus, including that it is very contagious and you are in close quarters with a lot of other people on a ship, puts you at risk for getting other diseases.

Even measles?

Especially measles.

In 2014, 136 people got measles after an unvaccinated person developed measles on a cruise ship, including 28 people on the cruise.

More recently, an unvaccinated teenager exposed others to measles on a Norwegian Cruise Lines ship while visiting Alaska. It seems like the same person also exposed folks to measles on a few planes and trains too.

How did they get measles? In Thailand.

This is almost certainly the same person who arrived at Vancouver International Airport from Tokyo on an Air Canada flight (July 30), leaving for Portland on Air Canada Jazz that same day.

While in Portland, they exposed people to measles at multiple locations:

  • Leno Medoyeff Bridal, 710 NW 23rd Ave., Portland, 3:30—5:30 p.m. (July 31)
  • Tom’s Pancake House, 12925 SW Canyon Rd., Beaverton, 7—9:30 a.m. (Aug. 1)
  • Max Red Line, Beaverton Transit Center to Pioneer Square, 12:30—1 p.m. (Aug. 2)
  • Max Red Line, Pioneer Place to Beaverton Transit Center, 5:30—6 p.m. (Aug. 2)
  • Verde Cocina, 5515 SW Canyon Ct., Portland, 2—4:30 p.m. (Aug. 5)

They weren’t done yet though.

You really shouldn't have to worry about measles when you board a plane, train, or cruise ship with your kids.
You really shouldn’t have to worry about measles when you board a plane, train, or cruise ship with your kids.

They then traveled back to Vancouver International Airport on an Alaska Airlines flight (August 6) and boarded a Norwegian Jewel cruise ship to Alaska.

Fortunately, the teen was placed in medical isolation shortly after boarding the ship and may have left the typically 7 day cruise early, as they were transferred to PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center on August 8.

How can you protect yourself?

Get vaccinated. You never know when someone who is unvaccinated is going to expose your family to measles or put them at risk for other vaccine-preventable disease.

More on Measles on a Plane, Train, and a Cruise Ship

Anti-Vaccine Points Refuted A Thousand Times

Every anti-vaccine argument is essentially a PRATT, a point refuted a thousand times.

“My statement I like to make on vaccines and autism, is that vaccines don’t cause autism, except when they do.”

Bob Sears

How many times has the idea that vaccines are associated with autism been refuted? More than a thousand times. We’ll still call it a PRATT though…

Want another example?

Johns Hopkins Medicine, which includes the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System went out of their way to correct this anti-vaccine misinformation.

Johns Hopkins Medicine, which includes the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System went out of their way to correct this anti-vaccine argument.

Correcting an anti-vaccine PRATT doesn't mean that they will stop using it.
Correcting an anti-vaccine PRATT doesn’t mean that they will stop using it.

Not surprisingly, anti-vax folks continued to bring it up.

Anti-Vaccine Points Refuted A Thousand Times

What are some other anti-vaccine points that have been refuted a thousand times?

There are probably a thousand of them, but I’ll just include some of the most common ones:

 

Anti-Vaccine Lies Vaccine Truths
Since your kids are vaccinated, it shouldn’t matter that I don’t vaccinate mine. One last time – some kids are at risk because they are too young to be vaccinated, have a true medical contraindication to getting vaccinated, or perhaps their vaccine didn’t work, and so your unvaccinated kid can put them at risk.
Herd immunity is a myth. Anti-vaccine folks simply do not understand herd immunity.
Doctors don’t learn anything about vaccines in medical school. Most doctors learn a lot about vaccines in school, but it is easy to see that some doctors don’t learn anything about vaccines in medical school – they are the ones who create their own immunization schedules and warn parents that vaccines are dangerous.
Vaccines didn’t save us – it was improved living conditions, better nutrition, indoor plumbing, and sanitation. If this were true, then how come these factors didn’t also stop RSV, norovirus, HIV, and other non-vaccine-preventable diseases?
Vaccine free kids are healthier than those who get vaccines. They aren’t. They just get more vaccine-preventable diseases. Did you know that there are unvaccinated kids with autism?
Vaccine ingredients are toxic. The ingredients in vaccines are not toxic. Remember, the wise words of Paracelsus, the father of toxicology, “Solely the dose determines that a thing is not a poison”
Vaccines aren’t tested. Vaccines are well tested before being approved and continue to be tested for safety and efficacy after we begin using them. They are even tested together.
Vaccine makers have immunity from any liability. If vaccine manufacturers are free of any liability, then why is there a vaccine lawsuit against Merck about the mumps vaccine? Vaccine manufacturers have liability for their vaccines and can still be sued by parents, although they do typically have to go through Vaccine Court first.
SIDS was made up to cover up for vaccine deaths. Except that infants died of SIDS before we had vaccines.
The anti-vaccine movement is based on science. The anti-vaccine movement is based on fear, conspiracy theories, and pseudoscience.
If a wound bleeds, you don’t need a tetanus shot. Whether or not a wound bleeds, you may need a tetanus shot and tetanus immune immunoglobulin if it has been more than five years since your last vaccine.
Shedding from vaccinated kids start most outbreaks. Few vaccines shed and even those that do are rarely the cause of outbreaks, which can typically be traced to an unvaccinated children or adult.
Kids get too many vaccines and it can overwhelm their immune system. Infants do have an immature immune system, which is one reason why they need protection from vaccines, but it is mature enough to respond to those vaccines as maternal protection quickly fades.
“DTP scream” is caused by encephalitis. Prolonged crying after getting a DTP or DTaP vaccine is a painful local reaction and is not caused by encephalitis.
Package inserts prove that vaccines cause SIDS, autism, and meningitis. Folks who use the package insert argument just don’t understand how package inserts are written.
Kids are still getting exposed to just as mercury in vaccines as ever. Since most flu vaccines are now thimerosal free, few if any kids are exposed to thimerosal in vaccines.
Aluminum in vaccines is toxic. Aluminum in vaccines is not toxic.
Vaccines contain aborted fetal tissue. Some vaccines are made with descendant cells from two electively terminated pregnancies (abortions) in the 1960s, so those vaccines have a distant association with abortion, but there is no fetal tissue or aborted baby parts in any vaccine.
No one believed Ignaz Semmelweis and he was later proven to be right. Yes, but just because we think you are wrong, that doesn’t make you Semmelweis. It is more likely that you are just wrong.
Andrew Wakefield is not a fraud. Uh, yeah he is.
Vaccines aren’t safe and cause cancer because the package insert says that they aren’t evaluated for mutagenicity, carcinogenicity and impairment of fertility. The section of the package insert that talks about mutagenicity, carcinogenicity and impairment of fertility is talking about long term studies. All vaccines have preclinical toxicology studies to see if those long term studies need to be done. Typically they are not, so aren’t evaluated because it isn’t necessary to do so, not because this testing was just skipped.
Higher infant mortality rates in the United States prove that vaccines aren’t safe. Infant mortality rates have nothing to do with vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases. And they have been decreasing to ever lower levels.
Vaccine side effects are underreported to VAERS. While that is likely true, they aren’t underreported by as much as folks think, and serious side effects are likely reported much more commonly.
Pediatricians get vaccine bonuses. Pediatricians don’t routinely get vaccine bonuses. And they certainly don’t get millions of dollars in bonus money.
Infants get too high a dose of vaccines, because they get the same dose as adults. Vaccines are not typically calibrated by age or weight, because they work locally, stimulating an immune response where they are given, unlike antibiotics and other medicines that have travel throughout your whole body.
Kids are all different, so we shouldn’t use a one-size-fits-all immunization schedule. The immunization schedule has a lot of flexibility built into it, and with its list of precautions and contraindications, it it clearly not one-size-fits-all.
Andrew Wakefield was right. Andrew Wakefield has never been proven to be right. If anything, more and more studies show that he was wrong.
I have a religious exemption to getting my kids vaccinated. Which religion do you belong to? Most religions support getting kids vaccinated and protected. In fact, some consider it immoral to skip your child’s vaccines and leave them unprotected.
The Leicester Method proves that good sanitation and quarantines – not the smallpox vaccine – eradicated smallpox. While this is a nice theory, a booklet written by the medical officer from the time clearly shows that The Leicester Method included the use of the smallpox vaccine.
Vaccines aren’t safe because they are unavoidably unsafe. The term “unavoidably unsafe” relates to liability and doesn’t mean that vaccines are dangerous.
Polio was caused by DDT. There is no connection between DDT and polio.
Vaccine-preventable diseases are easily treated. They are easily treated in the sense that most don’t have any treatments, so there is not much to do, but not that you can provide treatment and make these folks better.
There are 300 new vaccines in the pipeline. Unfortunately, very few new vaccines are being developed for infectious diseases in children, at least not any vaccines that will be available any time soon.
Breastfeeding is better than vaccines at preventing infections. While breastfeeding has many benefits, it will not protect your kids from most vaccine-preventable diseases.
Ingredients in vaccines are toxic because they are injected directly into a child’s bloodstream and aren’t ingested and filtered by the body’s natural defenses. Vaccine ingredients are not toxic.
The media should give equal time to doctors and parents who are against vaccines. The media has gotten better at avoiding that type of false balance.
Vaccines don’t cover outbreak strains that cause measles and pertussis outbreaks. DTaP and measles vaccines cover all wild strains of pertussis and measles.
Kids get sick from vaccines in hot lots. Reports of hot lots come from misuse of VAERS reports. There are no true hot lots of vaccines.
People never regret not vaccinating their kids. Many parents do regret not vaccinating their kids when they get sick and catch a vaccine-preventable disease.
You have to quarantine your kids after they are vaccinated because of shedding. If you can get vaccines if you are a household contact of someone with compromised immunity, do you really need to worry about your neighbor vaccinating their kids during back-to-school “shedding season?”
Everything is a vaccine injury. While vaccines have some risks, most of what anti-vaccine folks thinks of as vaccine-induced diseases are not caused by vaccines.
The Brady Bunch measles episode proves that folks were never worried about measles. If Mr. and Mrs. Brady weren’t worried when all six Brady Bunch kids got measles at the same time, then why did they each call a pediatrician and have them come to the house to check all of the kids?
Polio disappeared because we changed the diagnostic criteria. Vaccines helped eliminate polio in the United States and is helping us get close to the final goal of eradication.
Vaccines cause Autoimmune/Inflammatory Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants. Most experts consider ASIA a made up syndrome.
Natural immunity is better than immunity from a vaccine. While natural immunity is great, it often comes at a price. You have to survive the disease and its complications. Most folks prefer a safer route – getting vaccinated.
Graphs prove that vaccines don’t work. Graphs are misused by folks as propaganda to make them think that vaccines don’t work. #VaccinesWork
Ex-vaxxers never change their mind. Reasonable people change their minds when presented with evidence. Many anti-vaccine parents change their minds and begin vaccinating their kids again.
Homeopathic vaccines are just as good as vaccines. Homeopathic vaccines, which are diluted to nothing, with just a memory of the original ingredient, don’t work.
Vaccines made in China are used in the United States. While vaccines are made in China, they are used in China and in some other countries – not in the United States.
Vaccine strain measles causes outbreaks. In every measles outbreak, there is always someone who asks – is it the vaccine strain? It never is…
Vaccine-preventable diseases are mild. Vaccine-preventable diseases often cause life-threatening infections with serious complications.
We are only afraid of diseases once they make a vaccine for it. If this were true, then why are parents so afraid of RSV? And why was there so much panic about Ebola? And why were folks put into Leper colonies?
Kids get 72 doses of vaccines. The idea of 72 doses is an inflated number that is meant to scare parents.
Vaccines aren’t necessary anymore. Know why you don’t hear about a lot of kids getting tetanus, rabies and other vaccine-preventable diseases anymore? Because most folks get vaccinated and protected. What happens when you don’t? Vaccines are necessary.
Vaccine deaths are common. Vaccine deaths are rare. They only seem common when folks misuse VAERS reports.
Folks who choose to skip or delay vaccines are smarter than everyone else. Parents who choose to skip or delay their child’s vaccines are not making smart decisions about vaccines.
Vaccines don’t prevent the spread of disease. Almost all vaccines do prevent the spread of disease.
Andrew Wakefield never said anything about autism. Except he did, at the press conference for his 1998 Lancet study, which was later retracted.
The US Government lost a landmark lawsuit that proves they haven’t done any safety studies on vaccines in over 30 years. While a settled lawsuit showed that they may have not filed the necessary reports, all safety studies and other things necessary to ensure that vaccines are safe have been done over the past 30 years.
Tetanus only lives in farm animal manure. Every anti-vaccine person thinks that they are an expert on tetanus. Are you going to bet your child’s life that they are right? Don’t. They are typically wrong… Tetanus spores can be found in dust, soil, feces, and in the mouths of some animals.
Hand,Foot and Mouth Disease is vaccine-induced and is caused by shedding from the polio vaccine. The study anti-vaccine folks used to come up with this theory actually said that the polio vaccine might be protective against hand, foot, and mouth disease.
You should detox after vaccines. You don’t need to detox after getting vaccines, but even if you did, the stuff folks tell you to do is a waste of time and money and is sometimes dangerous.
Alternative vaccine schedules are safe. Alternative vaccine schedules are made up and have no evidence that they are safe or effective? How could they be dangerous? Your child might get a vaccine-preventable disease on your delayed schedule
You shouldn’t vaccinate your kids if they have signs of a MTHFR mutation. The so-called MTHFR signs you read about are made up and are certainly not a reason to skip or delay your child’s vaccines.
Vaccines contain heavy metals. Vaccines do not contain any heavy metals. The closest that you might find would be a flu vaccine with thimerosal, as mercury is indeed a heavy metal and thimerosal breaks down to ethylmercury. But then, the great majority of flu vaccines are now thimerosal-free.
Aluminum replaced thimerosal in vaccines. Aluminum is an adjuvant, while thimerosal was a preservative. Aluminum didn’t replace thimerosal in vaccines, although anti-vaccine folks did go out of their way to make aluminum the new thing for parents to worry about.
Amish people don’t get autism. There are autistic Amish, and no, it’s not because they vaccinate.
The CDC is hiding data on vaccines, mercury, and autism. This is just another conspiracy theory.
I’m not anti-vaccine, I’m pro-safe vaccine. You can call yourself pro-safe vaccine or whatever else you want, but if you push anti-vaccine myths and propaganda, then you are anti-vaccine.
We are more careful about introducing baby food to kids than giving them vaccines. Wait. This is really an argument now? Baby food?
Vaccine Court has compensated over 70 families for autism. They have not.
You can’t get rabies from dog or cat bites anymore. You are unlikely to get rabies from a dog or cat these days in the United States, but only because most folks vaccinate their pets and people get rabies treatments if they are possibly exposed to an animal with rabies.
Pediatricians are just vaccine pushers. Then why don’t pediatricians push all available vaccines to everyone, like the adenovirus vaccine, BCG vaccine, Pneumovax, typhoid vaccine, and yellow fever vaccine, etc., instead of only using them in high risk situations?
The CDC owns vaccine patents and sells billions of dollars in vaccines each year. While the CDC does own some vaccine patents, they don’t sell vaccines.
Sweden banned mandatory vaccination Sweden has never had mandatory vaccination, so there was nothing to ban.
Utah banned the HPV vaccine. One local health department in Utah has decided to not offer the HPV vaccine, but it isn’t banned. You just have to get it at private clinics.
It’s dangerous to give kids Tylenol after they have had a vaccine. While there is some concern that giving Tylenol before your child’s vaccines might decrease the immune response, it isn’t dangerous.
There are hidden ingredients in vaccines. There are no hidden ingredients in vaccines.
More people are dying of viral hepatitis since the hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines were introduced. Nope. More people are dying of hepatitis C, but that isn’t vaccine preventable yet.
Anti-vaccine experts know a lot about autism. Anti-vaccine folks don’t seem to know anything about autism, except how to hurt autistic families.
The latest autism prevalence reports prove that there is an autism epidemic and that it is caused by vaccines. The latest report on autism prevalence from the CDC shows a rate that has increased to 1 in 59 children. And as county level trends in vaccination coverage show no correlation to those autism prevalence rates, folks will hopefully stop trying to associate vaccines with autism.
Vaccine mandates take away a parents choice to vaccinate their kids. Vaccine mandates don’t force anyone to get vaccinated. Some parents just don’t like their vaccine choices though.
Everyone should have died at the 1980 vaccination rates. This is  a silly argument. Vaccine-preventable diseases don’t kill everyone who gets them. Many children did die of what are now vaccine-preventable diseases in the 1980s though.
Vaccines cause cancer. Not only do vaccines not cause cancer, several vaccines can prevent you from getting cancer.
The unvaccinated can’t spread diseases they don’t have. While that is true, if they are unvaccinated, they are at increased to get these diseases and they can then spread them.
Peanut oil adjuvants in vaccines have caused a peanut allergy epidemic. No vaccines contain peanut oil adjuvants.
If there is a RISK, there must be a CHOICE. Parents nearly always have a choice on whether or not to vaccinate their kids, even if they live in a state without non-medical exceptions. Folks who get exposed to unvaccinated kids who get a vaccinate preventable disease don’t have that same vaccine choice though.
No one has died of measles in the United States in 15 years. Except for the women who died in 2015. She was exposed to an outbreak in Clallam County, Washington, which included four unvaccinated children and adults.
Vaccine injury denialism is a big problem. Vaccine injury denialism isn’t the problem, it is that some folks think that everything is a vaccine injury, from eczema and peanut allergies to multiple sclerosis and every sudden unexplained death.
Shaken baby syndrome is a vaccine injury. Although the NVIC offers advice to parents who have been accused of shaken baby syndrome, it should be clear that vaccines do not cause shaken baby syndrome.
Most adults aren’t vaccinated, so there can’t be any herd immunity. If you understand herd immunity, then you understand why this anti-vaccine argument is so silly.
Doctors have been wrong before. But when they are, doctors kept working on these issues, came up with new ways to think about them, confirmed them using the scientific method, and put things right. This is unlike when anti-vax folks are wrong.
Vaccines are made with antifreeze. There is no antifreeze in any vaccine.
Measles and other diseases are spread by undocumented immigrants and refugees. Nope. It isn’t immigrants and refugees, but instead our own citizens who aren’t vaccinated and who travel out of the country, getting exposed, and bringing back vaccine-preventable diseases and sometimes starting big outbreaks.
We didn’t have any of these vaccines when we were kids and we ended up fine. This argument is called survivorship bias. Those who died of a vaccine-preventable disease aren’t around to post about vaccines on Facebook or Twitter.
The flu vaccine can give you the flu. The flu shot is inactivated, so can’t give you the flu. Even the live flu vaccine, FluMist, is attenuated and cold-adapted, so won’t give you the flu.
You can always vaccinate, but can never unvaccinate your kids. You can’t vaccinate your child if they have already gotten a vaccine preventable disease. It is sometimes too late.
Bill Gates wants to depopulate the world with vaccines. This is a silly conspiracy theory.
The vitamin K shot is dangerous. Vitamin K is not a vaccine, but it is only dangerous to skip it, as we have seen with the increase in brain bleeds in newborns and infants who’s parents listen to bad advice about vitamin K and vaccines.
Vaccines have never been studied on pregnant women. Except that the Vaccine Safety Datalink has published 14 studies “related to pregnancy and vaccination during pregnancy” and is “also able to use data to study the health of children born to women who were vaccinated during pregnancy.”
Encephalitis is autism. Crying after getting vaccines is not encephalitis and encephalitis is not autism, although some anti-vaccine folks try to make this jump in logic (?) to convince themselves that vaccines are associated with autism.
Vegans don’t vaccinate their kids. Many vegans vaccinate their kids.
If you drop a vaccine vial and it breaks, you have to call in a HAZMAT team to clean it up. This isn’t true.
Vaccines are not Halal or Kosher. As a general rule, neither Muslims nor Jews are against vaccines.
Vaccine Court has paid out almost $4 billion. Yes, almost $4 billion since 1988 (30 years), during which time over 286 million doses of vaccines were given each year.
Other countries don’t give as many vaccines as the US. Many countries have very similar immunization schedules as the United States. Some even give more dosages of vaccines at an earlier age than we do.
Parents can skip the hepatitis B shot because babies don’t use drugs or have sex. Since babies can get hepatitis B from their mothers, the most effective strategy to prevent these infections is to vaccinate all newborns. And keep in mind that some older children and adults have gotten infected without risk factors. Since the vaccine is safe and effective, there is no good reason to skip it.
Doctors don’t provide informed consent about vaccines. In addition to the fact that health care providers do indeed provide informed consent, anti-vaccine folks don’t, as they overstate the side effects and risks of vaccines, minimize the risks of vaccine-preventable diseases, and make you think that vaccines don’t work.
There are no such things as coincidences. There are. Correlation does not imply causation.
Glyphosate, including the glyphosate that they think is in vaccines, will make half of all children autistic by 2025. Only seven more years to go…
There are ZERO double blind vaccine studies based on an inert placebo. Except for the these..
Johnny Gruelle developed the Raggedy Ann doll after his daughter died of a smallpox vaccine injury. Johnny Gruelle’s daughter played with the Raggedy Ann and Raggedy Andy dolls he created. She tragically did die later of a probable reaction to a smallpox vaccine.
There are almost no studies that compare vaccinated versus unvaccinated kids. Except for the one that showed unvaccinated kids weren’t any healthier than vaccinated kids and that they just got more vaccine-preventable diseases.
In the time that the number of vaccines have grown from 2 to over 50 in the childhood schedule, that the rates of chronic illness has grown to over 50%. Kids today are actually a very healthy generation, being born with the lowest child and infant mortality rates ever, low rates of hospitalizations, and one of the highest life expectancies in history.
Anecdotes are evidence. While technically anecdotes are a type of evidence, they are among the weakest forms of evidence. That’s why most people don’t put a lot of faith in vaccine injury stories.
China is still having measles outbreaks, even though 99% of folks there are vaccinated. Nope. China is not having big measles outbreaks among highly vaccinated people.
Simpsonwood Simpsonwood? Really?

Have you seen any other anti-vaccine talking points that need refuting?

More on Anti-Vaccine Points Refuted A Thousand Times

Answers To Frequently Asked Questions About Immunizations

Have questions about your child’s immunizations?

We probably have the answers.

Answers To Frequently Asked Questions About Immunizations

Not surprisingly, many parents have the same questions about immunizations and they want answers to reassure themselves that they are doing the right thing for their kids by getting them vaccinated and protected.

Still have questions?

Rotavirus vaccines are associated with a very small risk of intussusception, but that is not a good reason to miss the benefits of this vaccine.
Like most pediatricians, my kids are vaccinated and protected. Photo by Vincent Iannelli, MD

With so much misinformation out there scaring folks about vaccines, that’s not surprising.

Just keep in mind that every anti-vaccine talking point and myth they push has an easy answer, even as folks continue to move the goalposts in search of new arguments against vaccines.

Yesterday it was mercury. Today it’s aluminum. Tomorrow it will be something else, while they continue to use vaccine scare videos to make you think that vaccines aren’t safe.

Parents who do their research understand that the real threat to their kids isn’t vaccines, it is the anti-vaccine experts that continue to push propaganda about vaccines.

What to Know About Answers To Frequently Asked Questions About Immunizations

The most basic answers to your questions about vaccines are that while vaccines aren’t perfect, they are safe and necessary and they do work well to protect us from vaccine-preventable disease.

More on Frequently Asked Questions About Immunizations

100 Myths About Vaccines

Are there really 100 myths about vaccines that folks push to scare parents away from vaccinating and protecting their kids?

To make a long story short - flu vaccines don't contain a vaginal spermicide.
That flu vaccines contain a vaginal spermicide is a new myth being pushed by anti-vaccine folks.

Let’s see…

Actually, when you start to think about it, there are hundreds, as the modern anti-vaccine movement moves the goalposts and continuously comes up with new anti-vaccine talking points.

100 Myths About Vaccines

  1. My intentionally unvaccinated kids don’t put your kids at risk. – Of course they do, because some kids are too young to be vaccinated or fully vaccinated, some kids can’t be vaccinated, including those with immune system problems, and vaccines don’t work 100% of the time.
  2. Vaccines do cause autism. It’s the MMR vaccine. – Of all the competing theories of how vaccines are associated with autism (even though they aren’t), Wakefield‘s theory that it is the combined MMR vaccine was the first.
  3. Recently vaccinated kids shed virus for weeks or months and can infect unvaccinated kids. – While shedding is real for some live vaccines, like oral polio and rotavirus, it is rarely a problem.
  4. Vaccines don’t even work. – While some folks are worried about risks and side effects, others don’t even believe that vaccines work – ever. That’s understandable though, as it explains how they deal with the cognitive dissonance of leaving their kids unprotected from potentially life-threatening vaccine-preventable diseases. So instead of vaccines eradicating or controlling diseases, they come up with theories about improved sanitation and better nutrition doing all of the work. But of course, we know that vaccines work.
  5. It’s good to get measles and other vaccine-preventable diseases. – While some people think that getting measles and polio was once a welcome rite of passage for kids, they seem to forget that vaccine-preventable diseases are life-threatening and can leave survivors with serious disabilities.
  6. The shingles vaccine causes shingles. – The shingles vaccine won’t cause you to develop shingles, but if you got it and never had chicken pox, then like the chicken pox vaccine, it is thought that the shingles vaccine could theoretically cause a latent infection that reactivates = shingles.
  7. Vaccines do cause autism. It’s thimerosal. – Vaccines are not associated with autism.
  8. Getting too many vaccines too soon can overwhelm an infant’s immature immune system. Not true. Considering all of the germs that they are challenged with on a daily basis, it is easy to see that an infant’s immune system can handle all of the vaccines on the immunization and much more.
  9. Package inserts for vaccines admit that they cause autism. – While Tripedia, a DTaP vaccine that was discontinued in 2011, did list autism in the adverse reactions section part of the package insert, it also stated that “it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequencies or to establish a causal relationship.”
  10. Vaccines aren’t safe because the package insert says that they aren’t evaluated for mutagenicity, carcinogenicity and impairment of fertility. – All necessary pre-clinical or nonclinical testing is done on vaccines and their components.
  11. Big Pharma, or the pharmaceutical industry, is the one making all of the decisions about vaccines, including what goes in them, when you should get them, and deciding if they are really safe. – Of course there is no world-wide conspiracy about vaccines led by the pharmaceutical industry that involves doctors, health departments, the CDC, and the WHO, etc.
  12. Vaccines still contain mercury. The Kennedy Vaccine Gambit
  13. Antifreeze is a toxic ingredient in vaccines. – Antifreeze (ethylene glycol) is not, and has never been an ingredient in vaccines. Some vaccines do contain a similar sounding ingredient, 2-phenoxyethanol, but it isn’t antifreeze. Saying that some vaccines contain an ingredient that sounds like antifreeze isn’t as scary though.
  14. Alternative immunization schedules are better. The Bob Sears Snare
  15. Vaccines contain aborted fetal tissue. – While some vaccines are made with fetal embryo fibroblast cells from cell lines that are derived (the original cells have been copied over and over again) from two electively terminated pregnancies in the 1960s, the cells are removed from the final vaccine and no aborted fetal tissue is in any vaccine.
  16. Many people don’t vaccinate. – There is a very vocal minority of people who do their best to push misinformation and conspiracy theories about vaccines and vaccine dangers, but except for pockets of susceptibles and clusters of unvaccinated kids and adults, most people are vaccinated.
  17. The CDC says that you should stop breastfeeding to boost vaccine efficacy. – They have never said that. Neither has the WHO or any other group of experts. This myth about breastfeeding relates to a study done that suggested that delaying breastfeeding for an hour after getting the rotavirus vaccine might help it work better in developing countries.
  18. Vaccines aren’t tested. – Vaccines are well tested for both safety and efficacy before they are approved and are added to the immunization schedule.
  19. Herd immunity isn’t real. – Understanding just how wrong anti-vaccine folks are about herd immunity will help you go a long way towards understanding how they get most things about vaccines wrong. Herd immunity from vaccines is real.
  20. Vaccines are contaminated with brain-eating ameobas. – Viera Scheibner is a micropaleontologist who claims that that it is ‘well-established’ that vaccines are contaminated with amoebas. They aren’t.
  21. I have a link arsenal from Pubmed that show vaccines are dangerous. – PubMed is simply an index of articles in medical journals. Any medical journals, even they predatory, pay to publish medical journals. Being in Pubmed doesn’t mean that it is a good study. And cherry picking articles and abstracts from Pubmed doesn’t mean that you have done your research about vaccines or that you have found any proof that vaccines aren’t safe. It probably just means that you need to do a little more research.
  22. The vaccine schedule has ballooned since 1983 and kids now get too many shots! – While the vaccine schedule has certainly grown over time, that is simply because kids today are protected from many more diseases. While kids got fewer vaccines in 1983, that was also the pre-vaccine era for Hib, hepatitis B, pneumococcal disease, meningococcal disease, rotavirus, hepatitis A, HPV, and chicken pox, etc.
  23. Package inserts for vaccines admit that they cause SIDS. – Tripedia, a DTaP vaccine that was discontinued in 2011, does list SIDS in the adverse reactions section part of the package insert, but also states that “it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequencies or to establish a causal relationship.”
  24. The US has higher infant mortality rates than other industrialized countries because we give more vaccines. – Higher infant mortality rate in the US than some other industrialized countries are thought to be because we use different methods to calculate the infant mortality rate. They are also at the lowest level ever.
  25. MSG is a toxic ingredient in vaccines. – MSG is an ingredient in some vaccines, but it is safe and not toxic.
  26. Since adults don’t get vaccines or boosters, there can’t be herd immunity. – Most adults either already have natural immunity or have already been vaccinated, so this isn’t true. There are actually very few booster shots that adults need, but seniors do need a few extra vaccines.
  27. Sick people can just stay home, so it doesn’t matter if they are vaccinated. – That’s kind of how quarantines work, but the main problem with this theory is that with many diseases, including some that are the most contagious, you can actually be contagious even before you show symptoms and you know you are sick. That’s why they often talk about people being at school, on the train, shopping at Walmart, or even at the beach when they have measles and have exposed others in an outbreak.
  28. The media just scares people about outbreaks. – The media, with their vaccine scare stories, did once influence a lot of parents about vaccines, but it was more to make them afraid to get their kids vaccinated and protected. Alerting people of an outbreak in their area isn’t a scare tactic or hype. It is one of the ways to help control outbreaks, so that folks know when a disease is present in their community.
  29. Vaccinations are not immunizations. – While kind of catchy, like other anti-vaccine slogans, it is meaningless. Vaccines work.
  30. There is no Pharma liability. You can’t sue if a child is injured by a vaccine. – You can sue, you just have to go through Vaccine Court first.
  31. Many religions are against vaccines. – Very few religions actually object to immunizations, which makes it very surprising how many folks get religious vaccine exemptions.
  32. Measles and other vaccine preventable diseases aren’t that serious anymore. – They, of course, can still be life-threatening, even in this day of modern medicine.
  33. Over 99% of vaccine side effects from vaccines are not reported by doctors to VAERS. – That’s not really true. Although most common side effects probably are underreported, more moderate and serious side effects are reported. For example, one study found that while a rash after measles, a known mild, side effect, was not commonly reported, vaccine-associated polio was often reported to VAERS. It is also imported to keep in mind that VAERS isn’t the only way that the safety of vaccines is monitored.
  34. Many experts are against vaccines. – The so-called experts of the anti-vaccine movement are mostly doctors who are practicing way out of their field of expertise, including many who are not medical doctors, or whose ideas are not supported by the great majority of real experts on vaccines, infectious disease, and immunology.
  35. Vaccinated kids cause most outbreaks. – Not true. Although vaccines don’t always work 100% of the time and so vaccinated kids sometimes get caught up in outbreaks, they are not the cause of most outbreaks.
  36. Infants have an immature immune system and are too young to be vaccinated. – Not true. Although a baby’s immune system is immature, as compared to older kids and adults, vaccines work well to help protect them as their immune system continues to develop and mature.
  37. Vaccines cause shaken baby syndrome. – Vaccines do not cause shaken baby syndrome.
  38. The chicken pox vaccine has caused an epidemic of shingles. – Not true. It has been shown that the rise in shingles cases started before we started routinely giving chicken pox vaccines, did not continue to increase after we started routinely giving chicken pox vaccines, and also increased in countries that don’t give the chicken pox vaccines.
  39. The United States gives more vaccines than any other country. – While there would be nothing wrong with that, as it would mean we were protecting our kids from more vaccine-preventable diseases, if you take any time to look at the immunization schedules from other countries, you can see it isn’t true.
  40. Pediatricians can get up to $3 million in bonuses for vaccinating kids. – Pediatricians are not getting big bonuses, bribes, or kickbacks to vaccinate kids.
  41. Glyphosate is contaminating our vaccines and will help make 50% kids autistic by 2025. – Glyphosate is not in vaccines and Stephanie Seneff‘s theory that 1/2 of kids will be autistic in 8 years doesn’t make much sense either.
  42. Formaldehyde is a toxic ingredient in vaccines. – While formaldehyde is an ingredient in vaccines, it is also naturally found in all of our bodies and in some foods. The formaldehyde in vaccines is not toxic.
  43. Vaccines aren’t tested together. – Yes, they are. Pediarix (combo vaccine with DTaP, hepB, and IPV) was tested with Hib and Prevnar and the hepatitis A vaccine was tested together with DTaP, IPV, Hib, and hepatitis B. Most vaccination combinations have been tested together, including the flu shot.
  44. I’m not anti-vaccine, I’m pro-safe vaccine. – You can call yourself whatever you want, either pro-safe vaccine or pro-vaccine choice, but if you push anti-vaccine propaganda, then you are anti-vaccine.
  45. It can be safer to wait to get vaccinated. The Jay Gordon Maneuver
  46. $3.5 billion in vaccine court payouts prove that vaccine injuries are real. – No one says that vaccines are 100% safe or that vaccine injuries aren’t real. It is also important to keep in mind that the $3.5 billion in vaccine court payouts have been since 1988, during which billions of doses of vaccines have been given.
  47. Vaccines cause resistance in viruses and bacteria. – Not true. Vaccines are not causing an increase in vaccine-resistant bacteria or viruses and can actually help us fight the growing problem of antibiotic resistant bacteria.
  48. Unvaccinated kids are healthier. – A large study has shown that unvaccinated kids are not healthier than those who are vaccinated, they just get more vaccine-preventable diseases.
  49. People never used to worry about measles. – A Brady Bunch episode about measles doesn’t mean that people weren’t worried about measles in the old days. There are plenty of newspaper headlines describing how measles epidemic once closed entire school districts for weeks at a time. When a measles epidemic hit New York City in 1951, a headline on the front page of the New York Times read “City in Grip of Measles Epidemic; Unusually Severe Siege Forecast.” And remember when Lassie had to save Timmy when he had measles? Sounds like they were worried…
  50. Epigenetics explains many vaccine injuries. – No, it doesn’t.
  51. The one-size-fits-all immunization schedule makes kids sick. – Vaccines are not given using any kind of one-size-fits-all policy. Flexibility of when some vaccines can be given and the existence of contraindications and medical exemptions make that clear to most people.
  52. Herd immunity doesn’t apply to vaccines. – Uh. Yes it does.
  53. Doctors don’t learn anything about vaccines. – Doctors learn a lot about vaccines and vaccine-preventable disease. What they do need to learn more about are the latest anti-vaccine talking points, so that they can readily address your concerns about vaccines and things that you might have read or heard that have scared you about vaccines.
  54. The American Academy of Pediatrics “recommends that parents use the availability of HPV vaccines to usher in a discussion on human sexuality in a way consistent with their culture and values at a time when they determine their child is ready to receive that information.” It’s a fringe group of pediatricians, the American College of Pediatricians who said this, not the AAP, who recommends that all kids get vaccinated and protected with the HPV vaccines.
  55. Vaccines are made for adults, not kids. – Vaccines are made for both kids and adults. Some vaccines even have different formulations for kids than for adults, including hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and flu shots, etc. And think about how the DTaP (kids) and Tdap (teens and adults) shots are different, but protect against the same diseases. But vaccines work locally, where the shot was given, which is why it doesn’t really matter that kids or adults of different sizes get the same dose.
  56. The HPV vaccine just encourages kids to have sex. – Studies have confirmed that HPV vaccines are safe and they don’t encourage kids to unprotected sex, one of many HPV vaccine myths.
  57. Aluminum replaced thimerosal as the latest toxic ingredient in vaccines. – Aluminum in vaccines is not toxic and as an adjuvant, it did not replace the thimerosal, a preservative, in any vaccines.
  58. Hepatitis B is a STD vaccine, so newborn babies don’t need it. – Tragically, many infants still get perinatal hepatitis B infections because of missed opportunities to get vaccinated and when they are exposed in non-high risk situations. Don’t skip your baby’s hepatitis B shot.
  59. Correlation equals causation. – Many people think that their child is vaccine injured because they showed symptoms right around the time they received a vaccine. They correlate getting the vaccine with causing the vaccine injury. The correct phrase isn’t correlation equals causation though, it is “correlation does not imply causation. Just because two things seem to be related by time doesn’t mean that one caused the other.
  60. SV40 contamination of vaccines causes cancer. – While the SV40 virus did contaminate some early vaccines, it has been shown that this contamination did not cause cancer.
  61. Dr. Julie Gerberding, the first woman to lead the CDC, admitted that vaccines cause autism during an interview with Sanjay Gupta on CNN. – While discussing the Hannah Polling decision, Dr. Julie Gerberding did not say that vaccines can cause autism. She even went out of her way to mention all of the studies that “have concluded that there really is no association between vaccines and autism.”
  62. Vaccines don’t work to get rid of any diseases. They just make the diseases disappear by changing their names. – This has to be one of the silliest myths about vaccines. Yes, some folks believe that smallpox wasn’t eradicated. It was instead renamed to monkeypox. Polio became acute flaccid paralysis. And measles became roseola. Of course, that didn’t happen because vaccines do work.
  63. The first deaf Miss America suffered a vaccine injury. – Not true. While they initially blamed her being deaf on the DTP vaccine, it turns out that she had a reaction to the antibiotic Gentamycin that she was receiving for a Hib infection, a now vaccine-preventable disease.
  64. Diane Harper was a lead researcher for the HPV vaccine who came out against the HPV vaccines. – Diane Harper‘s comments about the HPV vaccine have been overblown and mischaracterized. She supports the HPV vaccines and believes that they are safe.
  65. Vaccines don’t work against pertactin-negative pertussis bacteria. – While we are finding more pertactin-negative pertussis bacteria, this doesn’t seem to be why we are seeing more pertussis or whooping cough. Pertussis vaccines work against other components of the pertussis bacteria besides pertactin and pertussis vaccines continue to be effective against pertactin-negative Bordetella pertussis bacteria.
  66. There are graphs and charts that prove that vaccines didn’t save us and that vaccines don’t work – Those mortality graphs are pure propaganda and do not show how cases of vaccine preventable diseases (morbidity) were not affected by overall improvements in mortality rates in the early 20th century (a lot of people still got sick even as more of them survived) or how the effects of improved sanitation, nutrition, and health care peaked by the 1940s (for example, they use death rates instead of just absolute numbers of deaths to hide the fact that measles killed about 400 people each year in 1960).  Vaccines work.
  67. Johns Hopkins warns cancer patients to avoid children who were recently vaccinated. – They did once, but Johns Hopkins and other hospitals updated their instructions as new information became available. Hospitals no longer warn patients about restricting exposure to people who have recently been vaccinated.
  68. Andrew Wakefield was proven right. – Wakefield has not been proven right. Studies have never confirmed his findings. He is still not allowed to practice medicine in the UK.
  69. The shocking revelations of the CDC Whistleblower proves that vaccines cause autism. – What was supposed to be the biggest anti-vaccine conspiracy story of all time, the CDC Whistleblower, must have been the biggest let down for the anti-vaccine movement. He didn’t really blow the whistle on anything or anyone and didn’t even appear in Vaxxed, the CDC Whistleblower movie! While being secretly recorded, he basically complained about the way his coauthors of a study on vaccines and autism dealt with some data that he felt was statistically significant.
  70. The Leicester Method proves that good sanitation and quarantines – not the smallpox vaccine – eradicated smallpox. – In addition to quarantines, they used vaccines in Leicester. They just didn’t use universal vaccination. They used ring vaccination – making sure all of the contacts of the person with smallpox got a smallpox vaccine. The Leicester Method of dealing with smallpox does not support the idea that smallpox was eradicated solely with good sanitation and quarantining folks with smallpox.
  71. That vaccines have been legally called unavoidably unsafe means that they are dangerous. – Not true.
  72. Vaccinating a child is like taking a child out of their perfectly functioning carseat and strapping them into a seat with dental floss. – Actually, the proper analogy would be that vaccinating a child is like protecting them with an age appropriate car seat. Skipping or delaying your child’s vaccines is like driving them around without a car seat or seat belts, so that they are unprotected if you get in a car accident.
  73. The HPV vaccine isn’t safe, isn’t even necessary, and is probably the most dangerous vaccine every made. – Of course this is not true. Fortunately, more and more parents are coming to understand that the over-the-top anti-vaccine rhetoric about the HPV vaccine isn’t true. The HPV vaccines are safe and necessary and they work to prevent cancer.
  74. Parents are losing their choice about vaccines and are being forced to vaccinate their kids. – While slogans about choice are catchy, new vaccine laws and mandates do not force anyone to get vaccinated.
  75. Vaccines cause ADHD. – Yes, you can add ADHD to the long list of so-called vaccine-induced diseases, but like the others, it isn’t true. Vaccines do not cause ADHD.
  76. Polio epidemics were caused by spraying of the pesticide DDT. – The only connection between DDT and polio is that some folks were so scared of polio, that once an outbreak came to town, because they didn’t know what caused it yet, they sprayed with DDT thinking it might be spread by mosquitoes. So polio first and then DDT spraying.
  77. You should skip or delay vaccinating your premature baby. – Except in some situations when preterm babies weigh less than 2000g and mom is known to be hepatitis B negative, your preterm baby should be vaccinated according to the standard immunization schedule.
  78. There are no double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials for vaccines. – Placebos are used in many vaccine trials and there are many double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials for vaccines.
  79. Homeopathic vaccines are a safe and effective alternative to real vaccines. – While they might not cause many side effects, homeopathic vaccines or nosodes aren’t going to do much else either. They certainly aren’t going to protect your child from any vaccine-preventable diseases.
  80. You should follow a Paleo vaccine schedule. – Like other non-standard, parent-selected, delayed protection vaccine schedules, the Paleo vaccine schedule is a made-up alternative to the standard immunization schedule and will leave your kids unprotected from vaccine-preventative diseases.
  81. People who are anti-vaccine don’t hurt autistic families. – While I’m sure they tell themselves that, in addition to pushing the idea that autistic kids are damaged by vaccines, there are many other ways that the anti-vaccine movement hurts autistic families.
  82. Vegans don’t vaccinate their kids. – While there are few vegan vaccines, most vegans do indeed vaccinate their kids.
  83. The measles vaccine doesn’t protect against all measles strains. – All currently used measles containing vaccines, including the MMR vaccine, do actually protect against all measles strains. There is only one main type of measles virus, despite the many small changes in the virus that can help us identify different strains and genotypes.
  84. There are over 100 vaccine/autism research papers that prove that vaccines cause autism. – No matter how high the count of research papers gets to, they still don’t support a link between vaccines and autism.
  85. The anti-vaccine movement is supported by science and research. – The beliefs of the anti-vaccine movement, from germ theory denialism to ideas about detoxing and chemtrails, are only supported by pseudoscience and conspiracy theories.
  86. A tetanus shot won’t help after you have already been cut, stabbed, or bitten. – Well, if you are fully vaccinated, you might not even need a tetanus shot after a cut, because you are already protected. If you are unvaccinated or if it has been more than 5 years since your last shot, a tetanus shot and tetanus immune globulin will indeed work to protect against tetanus spores germinating, growing and producing their exotoxin that produces the symptoms of tetanus.
  87. Vaccine immunity isn’t long lasting. – While that is true for some vaccines, vaccines do protect you during critical times, in most cases they do provide long lasting protection.
  88. Immigrants and refugees are spreading disease in the United States and are putting us at risk for a new pandemic disease outbreak. – Immigrants and refugees are not spreading disease in the United States.
  89. Parents have to pay the Vaccine Excise Tax to fund the Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund. – The Vaccine Excise Tax is actually a tax that the U.S. Department of the Treasury collects from vaccine manufacturers.
  90. Pediatricians are just vaccine pushers. – If that were true, then how come pediatricians don’t push all of the FDA approved vaccines on kids, such as the adenovirus vaccine, BCG vaccine, typhoid vaccine, or yellow fever vaccine?
  91. Chiropractors aren’t anti-vaccine. – Maybe some aren’t, but most chiropractors seem to believe in germ theory denialism, push anti-vaccine talking points, and don’t vaccinate their own kids.
  92. There are 300 new vaccines in the pipeline. – While new vaccines are always being researched and developed, we are not getting 300 new vaccines anytime soon. At least 1/3 of those are therapeutic vaccines for cancer. And 1/4 are for the same four infectious diseases – HIV, flu, RSV, and Ebola. So no, we aren’t getting 300 new vaccines.
  93. Most celebrities don’t vaccinate their kids. – While anti-vaccine celebrities seem to make the news a lot, there are many celebrities who advocate for vaccines.
  94. Breastfeeding is better than vaccines at preventing infections. – While breastfeeding is great and has a lot of benefits, including providing some passive immunity, it won’t protect your child from most vaccine-preventable diseases. Breastmilk contains IgA antibodies, and not the IgG antibodies that vaccines trigger in our bodies and which do cross the placenta and protect our babies for a short time. Breastmilk can help protect a child against some viruses and bacteria that cause diarrhea and respiratory infections, but it is not better than vaccines at preventing vaccine-preventable diseases.
  95. Ingredients in vaccines are toxic because they are injected directly into a child’s bloodstream and aren’t ingested and filtered by the body’s natural defenses. – The ingested vs injected argument comes up a lot, but doesn’t make much sense. For one thing, vaccines aren’t injected into the bloodstream.
  96. I used Google University to research vaccines, just like other medical professionals use google to look up medical information. – While it is true that many medical professionals are likely turning to the internet more than textbooks when they need to look something up, they are often using online medical textbooks or other reputable sites. They aren’t cherry picking information from sites that simply confirm their biases against vaccines.
  97. Vaccines aren’t tested for use in pregnancy. – They are and pregnant women should get a seasonal flu vaccine and a Tdap vaccine each and every pregnancy.
  98. DNA in vaccines can cause autism. – While highly fragmented (mostly destroyed) DNA has been found in some vaccines, it can’t cause harm.
  99. The Amish don’t get autism. – The Amish do get autism. They also do vaccinate – sometimes. They also get vaccine-preventable diseases as we saw in the large Ohio measles outbreak of 2014.
  100. The flu shot contains a vaginal spermicide. – It doesn’t.

Get educated about vaccines so you don’t get taken in by any of these myths.

Vaccines work. Vaccines are safe. Vaccines are necessary.

More On Vaccine Myths

 

Answers to Anti-Vaccine Talking Points

Polio Vaccine - don't wait until it's too late.
You can sometimes wait too long to get a child immunized…

Anti-vaccine folks are very good at coming up with questions about vaccines.

And there is nothing wrong with that.

It is good to be skeptical about things.

Unfortunately, they tend to believe the answers that they make up and any “evidence” that agrees with their point of view (confirmation bias). They also will agree with any “expert” who agrees with them, even if 99.99% of experts don’t.

And tragically, they sometimes convince some vaccine-hesitant parents that their answers are right too.

Answers to Anti-Vaccine Talking Points

Most questions people have about vaccines have easy answers.

Anti-vaccine folks likely were not expecting answers when they came up with their “9 Questions That Stump Every Pro-Vaccine Advocate and Their Claims,” but they quickly got them, even after they came up with 9 new questions.

So folks were hardly stumped by these fallacious arguments…

“To say that the relationship that antivaccine activists have with science and fact is a tenuous, twisted one is a major understatement.”

David Gorski on How Not To Debate a Pro-Vaxxer

How about all of the graphs they made proving that vaccines don’t work?

Or the 14 studies that they think say vaccines cause autism?

It should be obvious by now that folks who push anti-vaccine misinformation have a poor understanding of science and a “poor understanding of how vaccination works.”

Parents who are hesitant about vaccinating and protecting their kids shouldn’t though.

Johns Hopkins Medicine, which includes the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System went out of their way to correct this anti-vaccine misinformation.
Johns Hopkins Medicine, which includes the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System went out of their way to correct this anti-vaccine misinformation.
  • Learn what package inserts really say and don’t say.
  • Review common contraindications to getting vaccinated, so that you can understand that there are actually very few reasons to not vaccinate your kids.
  • Understand that shedding isn’t the big risk that some folks claim it to be, certainly doesn’t cause outbreaks, and doesn’t routinely restrict kids from visiting cancer patients.
  • Know that vaccines worked to eradicated smallpox, helped control measles, diphtheria, rubella, and other vaccine preventable diseases, and have helped get us very close to eradicating polio.
  • Understand that kids get more vaccines today so that they are better protected, but that it is still not too many and that they don’t get them too soon.
  • Review why vaccine ingredients are not toxic.
  • Know that no major religion is against you getting your kids vaccinated.

Getting educated about vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases will help you make a truly informed decision so that you don’t fall for the tactics and tropes of the anti-vaccine movement.

After all, once you get educated about vaccines, you will know that:

  • Andrew Wakefield has never been proven right
  • the movie VAXXED is pure propaganda
  • the CDC Whistleblower didn’t really blow the whistle on the CDC
  • herd immunity is real
  • they vaccinated folks at Leicester, it wasn’t all about quarantines
  • unavoidably unsafe does not mean that vaccines are dangerous
  • while almost $3.5 billion dollars have been paid out by the Vaccine Court since 1988 for about 5,555 compensated awards, it is important to understand that at least 2.8 billion doses of vaccines have been given just since 2006, and almost 80% of the compensated cases were settled, without an admission that a vaccine caused an injury.
  • the anti-vaccine movement harms autistic kids and their families
  • your pediatrician, with the CDC and Big Pharma, and doctors all over the world, are not part of a conspiracy hiding evidence that vaccines cause autism or any other vaccine induced diseases
  • while waning immunity is a problem with some vaccines, we are still in much better shape than we were in the pre-vaccine era, so even these vaccines are working, if not working perfectly well.
  • an unvaccinated child can more easily get measles, chicken pox, mumps, or pertussis because they don’t have immunity, not because we think these vaccine-preventable diseases will spontaneously pop up in their bodies.
  • natural immunity is great, as long as your child doesn’t suffer any of the complications of having a life-threatening disease.
  • you can sometimes wait too long to get your child immunized – long enough for them to get a vaccine-preventable disease that could have been prevented by a vaccine they didn’t get.

Most importantly,  realize that no matter what decision you make, no one is going to force you to vaccinate your child. You always have a choice, even if your choice is to skip or delay your child’s vaccines and put those around you at increased risk for getting a vaccine preventable disease.

What To Know About Anti-Vaccine Talking Points

Get educated about vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases so that you will understand that vaccines are safe, necessary, and that they work, and so you will be able to counter any anti-vaccine talking point you hear.