Category: Vaxopedia

Available Vaccines

In the United States, children routinely get 13 vaccines that protect them against 16 vaccine-preventable diseases including diphtheria, chicken pox, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, Hib, HPV, influenza, measles, meningococcal disease,  mumps, pertussis, pneumococcal disease, polio,  rotavirus, rubella, and tetanus.

Routine Vaccines

These 13 routine childhood vaccines include:

  1. DTaP vaccines (Daptacel or Infanrix) – 5 doses
  2. chicken pox vaccine (Varivax) – 2 doses
  3. hepatitis A vaccines (Havrix or Vaqta) – 2 doses
  4. hepatitis B vaccine (Engerix-B or Recombivax HB) – 3 doses
  5. Hib vaccine (ActHIB, PedvaxHIB, Hiberix) – 3 to 4 doses
  6. HPV vaccines (Cervarix or Gardasil) – 3 doses
  7. Influenza – a yearly flu shot
  8. MMR II – 2 doses
  9. Meningococcal vaccines (Menactra or Menveo) – 2 doses
  10. Pneumococcal vaccines (Prevnar 13 and Pneumovax 23) – 4 doses/1 dose
  11. Polio vaccine – 4 doses
  12. Rotavirus vaccines (Rotarix or RotaTeq) – 2 to 3 doses
  13. Tdap booster (Adacel, Boostrix) – 1 dose

Another vaccine or meningococcal B disease (Bexsero or  Trumenba), which is given as 2 or 3 doses to older teens, is not exactly routine yet. It has a “permissive” recommendation in that parents are told they can get it if they want their kids to avoid menB infections, but it is not required yet.

MenHibrix is yet another vaccine, a combination between Hib Meningococcal Groups C and Y, but it is only given to high risk kids.

Combination Vaccines

The availability of combination vaccines also means that your child doesn’t necessarily need to get as many shots as you see doses. For example, Pediarix combines the three vaccines, DTaP-IPV-HepB, into a single shot. Given three times, when your infant is two, four, and six months, that means that instead of nine shots, your child only gets three.

Other combination vaccines include:

  • Pentacel – DTaP-IPV-Hib
  • Kinrix – DTaP-IPV
  • ProQuad – MMR-Varivax

Using combination vaccines, your fully vaccinated and protected child might only get 18 shots by the time he starts kindergarten, not counting yearly flu shots.

Other Vaccines

In addition to the 13 routine vaccines that children get, other vaccines that might be given in special situations include the:

That there are so many vaccines that are not routinely given to kids should dispel the myth that pediatricians are simply vaccine pushers. After all, why don’t they push these vaccines then?

For More Information On Vaccines:

Vaccine Education and Advocacy

Need to get educated about vaccines?

In addition to reading through the Vaxopedia, these articles and websites can help you see through the myths and conspiracy theories that might make you think about delaying or skipping one or more vaccines.

Still have questions?

Your pediatrician can be a great resource.

Conspiracy Theories about Vaccines

Conspiracy theories about vaccines go hand-in-hand with the anti-vaccine movement.

From crazy theories about the Illuminati and medical mind control to the idea that Bill Gates is using vaccines to sterilize and depopulate the world.

Other conspiracy theories about vaccines include:

  • the oral polio vaccine caused the HIV epidemic
  • SV40, which did contaminate the original polio vaccines before 1963, causes cancer
  • vaccines don’t really work – instead better hygiene and nutrition led to decreases in vaccine-preventable diseases
  • vaccine-preventable diseases aren’t bad
  • someone is murdering doctors who are opposed to vaccines
  • they put antifreeze in vaccines
  • the CDC has known for a long time that vaccines cause autism
  • new vaccines contain RFID chips so the government can use these nano-microchips to track us
  • a shape-shifting parasitic alien species (the Reptilians) are creating a hereditary reptilian-human hybrid elite that use vaccines to poison us
  • almost anything written by Sharyl Attkisson or Robert F Kennedy, Jr

And the latest anti-vaccine conspiracy theories?

The flu vaccine killed Prince and vaccines are causing babies to be born with microcephaly – it’s not the zika virus.

For more information:

Vaccines For Children

The Vaccines for Children (VFC) program was created in 1993 in response to a measles epidemic. It provides free vaccines to eligible children (uninsured, underinsured, or on Medicaid) through specific VFC providers.

Although the vaccines are free, parents may be charged a fee for the office visit and an administration fee. Still, “if the family can’t afford the fee per shot, the fee must be excused.”

For more information:

Myths and Misinformation About Vaccines

Myths and misinformation about vaccines help to scare parents away from vaccinating and protecting their kids from vaccine-preventable diseases.

Fortunately, these vaccine myths are easily debunked.

For more information:

Vaccine Ingredients

From antigens and adjuvants to preservatives, learn about common ingredients in vaccines and why they are safe.

For more information:

Live Vaccines

Although people usually think in terms of live vs inactivated vaccines, there are actually many other types of vaccines, including those made up of subunits of a virus or bacterial antigen, toxoid vaccines, conjugate vaccines, DNA vaccines, and recombinant vector vaccines.

Unlike those other vaccine types, live vaccines included a weakened version of a virus or bacteria.

For more information about live vaccines, see: