Tag: conspiracy theories

Did CBS and Hulu Remove the Brady Bunch Measles Episode?

Have you heard the latest anti-vaccine conspiracy theory?

Measles is highly contagious, which is likely why all of the Brady kids got sick.
Measles is highly contagious, which is likely why all of the Brady kids got sick.

Remember the Brady Bunch measles episode?

The one where all the kids got sick and two different pediatricians had to visit the house to check on the kids?

Did CBS and Hulu Remove the Brady Bunch Measles Episode?

While anti-vaccine folks apparently use the fact that the Brady Bunch did a measles episode as a reason to skip or delay their own child’s vaccines, they have gone a little further now, coming up with a conspiracy theory about efforts to keep people from watching the episode.

Are CBS and Hulu part of a conspiracy to silence anti-vaccine folks?
Are CBS and Hulu part of a conspiracy to silence anti-vaccine folks?

The episode, Is There a Doctor in the House?, aired during season 1 on December 26, 1969.

For reference, this was just after the updated measles vaccine was approved in 1967, and when there were at least 25,826 measles cases in the United States and 41 deaths.

Why didn’t they talk about any of that during the episode?

Although some folks read a lot into the episode, it was basically about how Carol and Mike each called separate pediatricians to the house for the kids, one for the boys and one for the girls, instead of just calling one for the newly formed Brady bunch.

But think about it… If measles is so mild, why did they have to call their pediatricians?

And if nothing else, remember that it shows how contagious measles really is. All of the kids got sick!

But was the episode removed so that you can’t watch it anymore?

Where's Episode 13?!? Where are episodes 5, 6, 9, 10, 15, 17, and 18? Were they all about measles too?
Where’s Episode 13?!? Where are episodes 5, 6, 9, 10, 15, 17, and 18? Were they all about measles too?

Since a lot of other episodes are missing, and not just from season 1, it doesn’t seem very likely.

Why did they pull Season 6, Episode 4 Little Ricky Gets Stage Fright of I Love Lucy? Was that the one where he was got a smallpox vaccine?
Why did they pull Season 6, Episode 4 Little Ricky Gets Stage Fright of I Love Lucy? Was that the one where he was got a smallpox vaccine?

And keep in mind that it’s not uncommon for there to be missing episodes when you try to stream these older shows online.

Mostly remember that when you think that everything is a conspiracy, everything looks like a conspiracy, even when it is easy to find a more reasonable explanation.

More on the Brady Bunch Measles Episode Conspiracy

The CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy is Officially Dead

You remember the CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy, right?

The birth of a new anti-vaccine conspiracy theory!
The birth of a new anti-vaccine conspiracy theory!

After all, they just made it up last week..

Anyway, it was notable for not only being one of the sillier conspiracy theories anti-vaccine folks have come up with lately, but for spawning a secondary conspiracy theory that was even worse.

Apparently you can make up your own anti-vaccine conspiracy theories.
You can’t make this stuff up – apparently you can…

Yes, they thought that there “was so much hysteria around measles” because the vaccines were expiring.

The CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy is Officially Dead

Of course, MMR vaccine isn’t expiring…

This box of MMR was received in March 2019 and doesn’t expire until October 2020.

And those expiring contracts?

They were renewed! Just like they are every year.

So did everyone stop talking about measles and getting folks vaccinated?

Are all of the measles outbreaks over? Do they still have medical martial law in New York?

Did you buy into this conspiracy theory? Although it was obviously ridiculous, it only took a few minutes of real research to find proof of why it was so ridiculous.

More on the CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy


The CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy

Have you ever wondered where anti-vaccine conspiracy theories come from?

I’ve always figured they just make this stuff up…

The birth of a new anti-vaccine conspiracy theory!
The birth of a new anti-vaccine conspiracy theory!

And it is pretty clear that they do!

The CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy

Just consider their latest conspiracy, which they think explains “the measles outbreak and the scare tactics.”

Apparently you can make up your own anti-vaccine conspiracy theories.
You can’t make this stuff up – apparently you can…

It’s funny how the theory has already morphed into something even more unintelligible. Notice how it has already changed from their contract expiring to the vaccines themselves expiring.

Either way, how does that explain that a lot more folks are getting measles this year?!?

There were only 37 cases of measles in the United States in 2004…

More importantly, when the CDC vaccine contracts expired in 2004, as they do each and every year, why didn’t we see big jumps in measles cases? Didn’t they need to inflate the case counts to help with the re-negotiations?

What about all of the other years?

Did you buy into this conspiracy theory? Although it was obviously ridiculous, it only took a few minutes of real research to find proof of why it was so ridiculous.

More on the CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy


Is the Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine the Stupidest Vaccine Known to Man?

You probably aren’t surprised to hear that Japanese encephalitis isn’t very common in the United States.

“Travelers who go to Asia are at risk for getting Japanese encephalitis (See map). For most travelers the risk is extremely low but depends on where you are going, the time of year, your planned activities, and the length of the trip. You are at higher risk if you are traveling to rural areas, will be outside frequently, or will be traveling for a long period of time”

Japanese Encephalitis

Fortunately, if you are one of those travelers who will be at risk, a Japanese encephalitis vaccine is available.

Is the Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine the Stupidest Vaccine Known to Man?

So how many people get Japanese encephalitis in the United States?

Del Bigtree thinks that it is stupid to have a vaccine against a disease that kills up to 20,400 in the world each year.
Del Bigtree thinks that it is stupid to have a vaccine against a disease that kills up to 20,400 in the world each year.

Not many, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t important to have a Japanese encephalitis vaccine if you need it, right?

“Now correct me if I’m wrong, but no one seems to be complaining of the fact that we have two vaccines that injured have injury rates adverse events of over 100 people. Nine serious adverse events. When the disease itself has only infected 12 human beings in 24 years.

That means that both of these vaccines are six times more dangerous than the disease itself, yet no one on this panel seems to want to discuss that. I imagine that you all will pass whatever it is the Japanese encephalitis next – the stupidest vaccine known to man.

Remember 12 people infected in America – 4 million people visiting the Asia every single year – 24 years – 12 people been infected, and yet we are having this conversation. It is clear that this is a money making operation for the vaccine maker and has nothing to do with actual safety.”

Del Bigtree at the ACIP Meeting

Del’s rant was in response to the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices discussing Japanese encephalitis vaccines…

It is clear that he doesn’t understand how any of this works, so let’s correct him, since he did ask.

First things first.

Why does he think that only 12 people have been infected with Japanese encephalitis in the United States?

“In the United States, in 25-year period following licensure of JE vaccine in 1992, 12 travel-associated cases reported (< 1 case per year)”

Review of Japanese encephalitis (JE) and JE Vaccine Work Group plans

That’s actually the data from the ACIP JE Vaccine Work Group…

Japanese encephalitis is more common in Asia, where it is endemic in 24 countries in the WHO South-East Asia and Western Pacific regions.

Still, since it isn’t on the list of National Notifiable Conditions, it is possible that a low number of cases have been reported to the CDC because few of the cases actually get reported.

It is also possible that there are few cases because folks who are high risk now get vaccinated and protected. Rates were higher in the pre-vaccine era.

But there is also the fact that most travelers are not at risk to get Japanese encephalitis, so maybe there really have only been 12 cases.

“However, given the large numbers of travelers to Asia (>5.5 million U.S. travelers entered JE-endemic countries in 2004), the low risk for JE for most travelers to Asia, and the high cost of JE-VC ($400–$500 per 2-dose primary series), providing JE vaccine to all travelers to Asia likely would not be cost-effective. In addition, for some travelers with lower risk itineraries, even a low probability of vaccine-related serious adverse events might be higher than the risk for disease. Therefore, JE vaccine should be targeted to travelers who, on the basis of their planned travel itinerary and activities, are at higher risk for disease.”

Use of Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine in Children: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, 2013

That doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t have these vaccines or that this is all part of a money-making operation, does it?

If it was a “money-making operation,” wouldn’t the ACIP recommend the Japanese encephalitis vaccines for all travelers?

Or to make even more money, wouldn’t they just add it to the routine immunization schedule and recommended it for all children?

“Travelers to JE-endemic countries should be advised of the risks for JE disease and the importance of personal protective measures to reduce the risk for mosquito bites. For some travelers who will be in a higher-risk setting based on season, location, duration, and activities, JE vaccine can further reduce the risk for infection. JE vaccine is recommended for travelers who plan to spend a month or longer in endemic areas during the JE virus transmission season.”

Use of Japanese Encephalitis Vaccine in Children: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, 2013

Instead, they make recommendations, even with the latest updates, that virtually guarantees a very low market for the vaccine.

But if the disease isn’t common, why have a vaccine at all?

“Although symptomatic Japanese encephalitis (JE) is rare, the case-fatality rate among those with encephalitis can be as high as 30%. Permanent neurologic or psychiatric sequelae can occur in 30%–50% of those with encephalitis.”

Japanese encephalitis

Japanese encephalitis is deadly!

There have been at least 5 deaths, including 2 children, among just 12 cases (if Del's stats are right).
There have been at least 5 Japanese encephalitis deaths, including 2 children, among just 12 cases (if Del’s stats are right).

And since the Japanese encephalitis vaccines are safe, with few risks (Del is talking about VAERS reports when he talks about vaccine injury rates), why wouldn’t you get vaccinated and protected if you were going to be at risk?

“No safety concerns to date in post-licensure surveillance.”

Review of Japanese encephalitis (JE) and JE Vaccine Work Group plans

After all, there is nothing stupid about wanting to reduce your risk of getting sick and dying.

More on Japanese Encephalitis


Del Bigtree on the Government’s Plan to Force Inject Stuff into Your Body

Del Bigtree considers himself to be an expert on vaccines.

Bob Sears doesn't consider media talk show hosts to be expert sources of medical information.
Does Bob consider Del an expert source of medical information?

Either Bob Sears disagrees or he really does think that measles is a deadly epidemic…

Del Bigtree on the Government’s Plan to Force Inject Stuff into Your Body

What makes Del Bigtree an expert on vaccines?

Del’s claim to fame is that he “was an Emmy Award-winning producer on the daytime talk show The Doctors, for six years.”

Del Bigtree shared a Daytime Emmy Award with 27 other producers...

So he shared a Daytime Emmy Award with 27 other producers…

And he produced Andrew Wakefield‘s Vaxxed movie. The whistleblower movie that didn’t actually include the whisteblower…

It sounds like pure anti-vaccine propaganda

So what did Del have to say in Washington?

“These crowds are gathering all over the nation because we are talking about having the government force inject free citizens. Think about it. Take vaccines out of it. We are going to force inject children of free parents.

Now there are people that are really worried about Donald Trump. He is forcing a wall to be built on the border of this country, but now we are not worried about a forced injection by the government?

If someone worse than Trump, someone more dangerous, more controlling… This person puts in the CDC, the head of the CDC, the head of the FBI, the head of the NIH, the head of the EPA… Do we really want to give the government power over our bodies where we have no say on what it injects into us? This isn’t an issue about vaccines. This is an issue about the last thing we can control in a free country which is our bodies.”

Del Bigtree

Of course, no one is talking about forcing anyone to vaccinate their kids. That’s not what a vaccine mandate to go to school does.

But that’s not all…

Alex Jones Del included a lot of standard anti-vaccine misinformation that we hear over and over again:

He also mentioned his lawsuits against the HHS and FDA which he thinks “proves that none of this science is really there.”

“I actually want my children to have the measles. This is a disease that only affected killed 1 in 500,000 in 1960 before the vaccine ever arrived. You’ll hear 1 in 1,000, that’s a lie. Technically, 1 in 10,000 people who get the disease could die from it. Those are tiny numbers. That’s the same number that autism used to be.”

Del Bigtree

Tiny numbers?

Just remember that in 1960, there were 434 measles deaths in the United States.

And while the great majority of people did indeed survive having measles, it was hardly a walk in the park. Most people describe kids with measles as being miserable, with a high fever for a week, a cough, and other symptoms, which is why they often end up going to the ER several times before they finally get diagnosed.

Which brings me to perhaps the only time I might ever agree with Bob Sears – folks like this should not be considered medical experts!

“But I would think when you have a child with autism, you know, or on the spectrum, you have no reference point. You have no…

I don’t want this to sound wrong, but it’s a little bit more like having a dog or a Doberman or something that you don’t understand how it thinks, you don’t know. I mean, I mean a better figure than animal reference except… you don’t have their brain.

Or you hear about stories of people that bring home of exotic you know of chimpanzee or something where they can’t, and this is not sounding right.”

Del Bigtree

Not about vaccines, and certainly not about autism.

More on Del Bigtree

Behind the Curtain of the Anti-Vaccine Movement

Ever wonder what anti-vaccine folks talk about?

How they do their research?

Behind the Curtain of the Anti-Vaccine Movement

Here you go!

How do you argue the point that vaccines killed off all of the diseases?
That seems like a reasonable question…

There is a good reason that folks have a hard time arguing this point.

Vaccines work.

But let’s see how they do…

It is with her summary that says you can treat cancer naturally and without chemotherapy.
It is with her summary that says you can treat cancer naturally and without chemotherapy.

The idea that we simply renamed diseases to make them disappear has to be the silliest anti-vaccine claim that you will hear. If that’s true, why not come out with an RSV vaccine or an HIV vaccine and rename those diseases?

If smallpox was renamed to monkey pox, then where are all of the kids with monkey pox?
If smallpox was renamed to monkey pox, then where are all of the kids with monkey pox?

The idea that better hygiene, sanitation, and good nutrition made now vaccine-preventable diseases go away is a very good theory, because those things did actually improve the mortality rates for most things in the early part of the 20th century. Unfortunately, those effects plateaued by the 1930s.

When my uncle got polio in Brooklyn in the early 1950s, our family and access to very good hygiene, sanitation and nutrition. It didn’t help. Remember, a lot of people were still dying at the time from polio, pertussis, diphtheria, and measles.

It was vaccines.

Actually, it’s the charts and graphs with declining mortality rates from better hygiene and sanitation in the early 20th century that anti-vaccine folks can use to fool folks into thinking that vaccines don’t work. If they actually look at disease rates, with a few exceptions, they will see that they were mostly unchanged.

Charts with mortality rates won't prove their point, but are their only chance to fool folks. They have no chance if they use disease rates...
Charts with mortality rates won’t actually prove their point, but are their only chance to fool folks. They have no chance if they use disease rates

This is actually an interesting idea. Do viruses and bacteria become attenuated or less dangerous over time? Considering that smallpox was around for thousands of years and was still deadly right up until it was eradicated, in general, there is plenty of evidence against this idea. You can also look at polio, which still paralyzing people.

Scarlet fever has become less dangerous, but no evidence that many other diseases have over time.
Scarlet fever has become less dangerous, but no evidence that many other diseases have over time.
Sanitation, plumbing, clean food, hygiene worked to get rid of diseases - anything but vaccines...
Anything but vaccines…

This is another silly idea. It implies that vaccines actually cause outbreaks of vaccine-preventable disease. If this were true, then as we have been vaccinating more and more people, wouldn’t rates for all of these diseases have been going up over the years? And how did we eradicate smallpox? How are we so close to eradicating polio?

Then why do we see outbreaks in clusters of folks who are mostly intentionally unvaccinated.

Instead, we see outbreaks in clusters of folks who are mostly intentionally unvaccinated and no, it’s not just during “shedding season.”

Witch's brew of vaccines?
Again, anything but vaccines…

Do you really believe that ‘they’ are purposely “releases (sic) these diseases again, to cause hysteria, to get people back in their corner vaccinating again?”

It's a conspiracy! Big Pharma!!!
It’s a conspiracy! Big Pharma!!!
Vaccines are not killing people.
And yet, life expectancy and infant mortality rates are going up…

We know why they are coming back… It ain’t magic.

Are you prepared to argue their point now?

Did they convince you that we renamed diseases, flushing toilets and clean water got rid of all diseases, vaccines cause outbreaks, or that all of the diseases we developed vaccines for just naturally got milder and went away?

Or did they convince you to go out and vaccinate and protect your kids?

More on Behind the Curtain of the Anti-Vaccine Movement

Did CNN Apologize for Using a Fake Measles Photo?

We have seen a lot of fake stories since the measles outbreaks started.

Will these folks apologize when they realize that it wasn't a photo of a child suffering an adverse reaction to the measles vaccine?
Will these folks apologize when they realize that it wasn’t a photo of a child suffering an adverse reaction to the measles vaccine?

And they are all from the usual suspects.

Did CNN Apologize for Using a Fake Measles Photo?

And no, I’m not talking about the photo from CNN.

It's not a conspiracy...
It’s not a conspiracy…

So what’s up with the photo?

This photo is in the CDC archives.
This photo is in the CDC archives.

The child in the photo doesn’t actually have measles, although he does have a rash that looks like measles.

“This 1968 image depicted the face and back of a young child after receiving a smallpox vaccination in the right shoulder region. Note the erythematous halo surrounding the vaccination site, which can also be seen in PHIL 13321 and 13323, as well as a morbilliform skin rash, i.e., resembling measles, consisting of numerous flattened erythematous, amorphous macules. This child was subsequently diagnosed with roseola vaccinia.”

Public Health Image Library (PHIL)

And it is a photo of a child of a vaccine reaction, a reaction to his smallpox vaccine.

Why did CDC use that photo?

Who knows, but there aren’t a lot of photos of kids with measles out there. They likely found a stock photo of a kid with a rash that looked like measles and used it.

Learn the risk of following the advice of Brandy Vaughan.
Learn the risk of following the advice of Brandy Vaughan.

Still, while they didn’t use a photo of a child with measles, they also didn’t use a photo of a child that got measles from the vaccine, as Brandy Vaughan claims.

And of course, the rest of the story about Washington being under a state of emergency still stands, as measles cases continue to rise.

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