Tag: Brandy Vaughan

Do Vaccines Contain Pesticides?

Wait, why would anyone think that vaccines contain pesticides?

Well, you would be surprised about the things that some folks claim are in vaccines, from vaginal spermicides and antifreeze to peanut oil.

Do Vaccines Contain Pesticides?

Who is making these claims?

If you are anti-science, you are probably going to be anti-science all of the way...
That actually makes sense. If you are anti-science, you are probably going to be anti-science all of the way…

The usual suspects have been spreading this anti-vaccine myth for years

This is old misinformation.
This is old misinformation.

Of course, it isn’t true.

Glyphosate, an herbicide, isn’t really in any vaccines.

Neither are any other poisons or toxins.

Vaccines are safe, with few risks.

More on Pesticides in Vaccines

Who’s Who in the Anti-Vaccine Movement – 2019 Edition

We know that there will always be some folks who won’t vaccinate their kids.

“Although many may characterize all individuals who eschew vaccines as “anti-vaccine” or “vaccine deniers,” in reality, there is a broad spectrum of individuals who choose not to have themselves or their children vaccinated.”

Tara C Smith on Vaccine Rejection and Hesitancy: A Review and Call to Action 

Who are these people?

Who’s Who in the Anti-Vaccine Movement – 2019 Edition

We used to conveniently call them anti-vaccine, but that doesn’t really work.

Well, it still does, as long as you understand who you are talking about.

The thing is, the folks who don’t vaccinate their kids exist on a spectrum, from those who just need a little extra reassurance (the worrieds) or a lot of extra reassurance (parents who are on the fence or vaccine-hesitant), to vaccine refusers (will likely vaccinate during an outbreak, etc.) and deniers who likely aren’t vaccinating their kids in any circumstance and who might try to persuade others to avoid vaccines too – the vocal vaccine deniers.

So you don’t really want to bunch them all up one big anti-vaccine group, especially when you are typically talking about the vocal vaccine deniers, many of whom believe that they have a child who was injured or damaged by a vaccine.

We are still missing some folks though…

No, I’m not talking about those who like to claim that they are pro-safe vaccines, pro-choice vaccines, or vaccine skeptics, just because they don’t want to be labeled as being anti-vaccine.

Bob Sears appeared on Fox & Friends in 2010 for the segment "Vaccines: A Bad Combination?"
Remember when Bob Sears appeared on Fox & Friends in 2010 for the segment “Vaccines: A Bad Combination?”

We need to talk about the:

These are the folks who push misinformation about vaccines that scares parents away from vaccinating and protecting their kids.

Who's to blame for low immunization rates and continuing outbreaks?
Who’s to blame for low immunization rates and continuing outbreaks?

Do you know who I’m talking about it? Have you noticed that these folks never seem to face any consequences?

Who else do we need to talk about?

I remember speaking with my mother about vaccines, and at one point in our discussion, she claimed a link existed between vaccines and autism. In response, I presented evidence from the CDC which claimed directly in large bold letters, “There is no link between vaccines and autism.” Within the same article from the CDC on their official website, extensive evidence and studies from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) were cited. Most would assume when confronted with such strong proof, there would be serious consideration that your views are incorrect. This was not the case for my mother, as her only response was, “that’s what they want you to think.”

Ethan Lindenberger

There are also the folks who are pushing an anti-science agenda, making you think that mainstream doctors are bad and that anything holistic and natural must be good. Until the damage these folks are doing is seriously addressed, it won’t matter if we get a few anti-vaccine folks off of Amazon, Facebook and Pinterest.

Learn to be more skeptical. Do real research. Vaccinate your kids.

More on Who’s Who in the Anti-Vaccine Movement – 2019 Edition

Behind the Curtain of the Anti-Vaccine Movement

Ever wonder what anti-vaccine folks talk about?

How they do their research?

Behind the Curtain of the Anti-Vaccine Movement

Here you go!

How do you argue the point that vaccines killed off all of the diseases?
That seems like a reasonable question…

There is a good reason that folks have a hard time arguing this point.

Vaccines work.

But let’s see how they do…

It is with her summary that says you can treat cancer naturally and without chemotherapy.
It is with her summary that says you can treat cancer naturally and without chemotherapy.

The idea that we simply renamed diseases to make them disappear has to be the silliest anti-vaccine claim that you will hear. If that’s true, why not come out with an RSV vaccine or an HIV vaccine and rename those diseases?

If smallpox was renamed to monkey pox, then where are all of the kids with monkey pox?
If smallpox was renamed to monkey pox, then where are all of the kids with monkey pox?

The idea that better hygiene, sanitation, and good nutrition made now vaccine-preventable diseases go away is a very good theory, because those things did actually improve the mortality rates for most things in the early part of the 20th century. Unfortunately, those effects plateaued by the 1930s.

When my uncle got polio in Brooklyn in the early 1950s, our family and access to very good hygiene, sanitation and nutrition. It didn’t help. Remember, a lot of people were still dying at the time from polio, pertussis, diphtheria, and measles.

It was vaccines.

Actually, it’s the charts and graphs with declining mortality rates from better hygiene and sanitation in the early 20th century that anti-vaccine folks can use to fool folks into thinking that vaccines don’t work. If they actually look at disease rates, with a few exceptions, they will see that they were mostly unchanged.

Charts with mortality rates won't prove their point, but are their only chance to fool folks. They have no chance if they use disease rates...
Charts with mortality rates won’t actually prove their point, but are their only chance to fool folks. They have no chance if they use disease rates

This is actually an interesting idea. Do viruses and bacteria become attenuated or less dangerous over time? Considering that smallpox was around for thousands of years and was still deadly right up until it was eradicated, in general, there is plenty of evidence against this idea. You can also look at polio, which still paralyzing people.

Scarlet fever has become less dangerous, but no evidence that many other diseases have over time.
Scarlet fever has become less dangerous, but no evidence that many other diseases have over time.
Sanitation, plumbing, clean food, hygiene worked to get rid of diseases - anything but vaccines...
Anything but vaccines…

This is another silly idea. It implies that vaccines actually cause outbreaks of vaccine-preventable disease. If this were true, then as we have been vaccinating more and more people, wouldn’t rates for all of these diseases have been going up over the years? And how did we eradicate smallpox? How are we so close to eradicating polio?

Then why do we see outbreaks in clusters of folks who are mostly intentionally unvaccinated.

Instead, we see outbreaks in clusters of folks who are mostly intentionally unvaccinated and no, it’s not just during “shedding season.”

Witch's brew of vaccines?
Again, anything but vaccines…

Do you really believe that ‘they’ are purposely “releases (sic) these diseases again, to cause hysteria, to get people back in their corner vaccinating again?”

It's a conspiracy! Big Pharma!!!
It’s a conspiracy! Big Pharma!!!
Vaccines are not killing people.
And yet, life expectancy and infant mortality rates are going up…

We know why they are coming back… It ain’t magic.

Are you prepared to argue their point now?

Did they convince you that we renamed diseases, flushing toilets and clean water got rid of all diseases, vaccines cause outbreaks, or that all of the diseases we developed vaccines for just naturally got milder and went away?

Or did they convince you to go out and vaccinate and protect your kids?

More on Behind the Curtain of the Anti-Vaccine Movement

When You Ask for Vaccine Advice in an Anti-Vaccine Facebook Group…

Can you guess what happens when you ask for advice about vaccines in an anti-vaccine Facebook Group?

Meningitis is not a side effect of vaccines.

What could go wrong?

When You Ask for Vaccine Advice in an Anti-Vaccine Facebook Group…

While most of us are used to hearing about meningococcal meningitis being a big risk for teens and young adults, it is important to realize that rates of disease are also high for infants, with a second peak during adolescence.

The highest rates of meningococcal disease occurs during infancy and adolescence.

So why don’t we routinely vaccinate infants against meningococcal disease?

Many countries do, including Australia and the UK, and in the United States, high risk infants are vaccinated against meningococcal disease.

If you were on the fence but were advised by your paediatrician (Australian spelling) to get vaccinated and protected because a child in your town had just died, would you get vaccinated?

Or would you listen to folks in an anti-vaccine Facebook group who tried to convince you that meningitis was actually a side effect of getting vaccinated?

Folks who insist that deaths from vaccine-preventable disease aren’t real and that instead, they are actually vaccine-injuries?

We know what happens when you ask for vaccine advice in an anti-vaccine Facebook group. The members push their propaganda to scare you away from vaccinating and protecting your kids.

Don’t listen to them. Vaccines are safe and necessary.

More on When You Ask for Vaccine Advice in an Anti-Vaccine Facebook Group…

Did CNN Apologize for Using a Fake Measles Photo?

We have seen a lot of fake stories since the measles outbreaks started.

Will these folks apologize when they realize that it wasn't a photo of a child suffering an adverse reaction to the measles vaccine?
Will these folks apologize when they realize that it wasn’t a photo of a child suffering an adverse reaction to the measles vaccine?

And they are all from the usual suspects.

Did CNN Apologize for Using a Fake Measles Photo?

And no, I’m not talking about the photo from CNN.

It's not a conspiracy...
It’s not a conspiracy…

So what’s up with the photo?

This photo is in the CDC archives.
This photo is in the CDC archives.

The child in the photo doesn’t actually have measles, although he does have a rash that looks like measles.

“This 1968 image depicted the face and back of a young child after receiving a smallpox vaccination in the right shoulder region. Note the erythematous halo surrounding the vaccination site, which can also be seen in PHIL 13321 and 13323, as well as a morbilliform skin rash, i.e., resembling measles, consisting of numerous flattened erythematous, amorphous macules. This child was subsequently diagnosed with roseola vaccinia.”

Public Health Image Library (PHIL)

And it is a photo of a child of a vaccine reaction, a reaction to his smallpox vaccine.

Why did CDC use that photo?

Who knows, but there aren’t a lot of photos of kids with measles out there. They likely found a stock photo of a kid with a rash that looked like measles and used it.

Learn the risk of following the advice of Brandy Vaughan.
Learn the risk of following the advice of Brandy Vaughan.

Still, while they didn’t use a photo of a child with measles, they also didn’t use a photo of a child that got measles from the vaccine, as Brandy Vaughan claims.

And of course, the rest of the story about Washington being under a state of emergency still stands, as measles cases continue to rise.

More on Did CNN Apologize for Using a Fake Measles Photo?

Who is Larry Cook?

Larry Cook is either one of the movers and shakers of the modern anti-vaccine movement, with his Stop Mandatory Vaccine group, a ‘double agent’ who worked to oppose a vaccine law in California, while also lobbying for the law, or someone who other anti-vax folks claims “puts his own profit far ahead of our children.”

Who is Larry Cook?

Larry Cook says that he has devoted himself to natural living for over 25 years.

“I studied video production and photography at Clover Park Vocational-Technical Institute in Tacoma, Washington and I received my bachelor’s degree from The Evergreen State College in Olympia, WA.”

From developing natural living magazines and self-publishing a book about ADHD, he became the Executive Director of the California Naturopathic Doctors Association, a position he held for four years.

He resigned in 2016 to devote his time to “educating” folks about vaccines.

“Finally, I believe my mission is to educate as many parents and others as possible about the dangers of vaccination, the lack of efficacy of vaccination, and why natural immunity is superior to vaccination.”

He even has a GoFundMe page to support his mission…

Is Larry Cook on a mission to take advantage of and profile parents who think that their kids have been vaccine injured?
A mission to take advantage of and profile parents who think that their kids have been vaccine injured? Who he thinks have been vaccine injured, even when the parents don’t.

How did he get started in his quest to save children from vaccines, which he believes are a “200 year old mistake?”

“In late March or early April, 2015, Mr. Cook started a GoFundMe campaign to produce short films, interviews with parents who felt their children had been damaged by vaccines, in order to share those stories with legislators and the general public to build opposition to SB277.”

ConspiraSea, SB277, Colin McRoberts, Larry Cook, and Me

Of course, SB277 passed, and Larry Cook soon left his job as Executive Director of the California Naturopathic Doctors Association, with a new career and salary from his GoFundMe donations.

Why are anti-vax folks always participating in and promoting “free” online summits? They never disclose that they are making money from them, but they usually are.

I guess his campaign went well, at least for him.

It turned into a full time job.

“A video I wish I didn’t have to make. When I started in this movement, I had no idea it would be as corrupt as pharma.

But I have had my eyes opened many times over…this video describes just one of many disappointments along the way: Larry Cook, who runs a popular page and group.

In the beginning, I believed what he told me and tried to look past the many odd comments and strange behaviors. But it ultimately became clear that he puts his own profit far ahead of our children.

That in and of itself wasn’t enough to motivate me to speak out and open myself up to the hundreds of attacks I would get, I kept hoping the truth would be exposed by someone else. And while some have tried, the past couple of weeks I have seen too much to stay silent any longer.”

Brandy Vaughan

 Surprisingly, he even has critics in the anti-vaccine world

Unfortunately, they aren’t critical of his extreme views, including that vaccines are “filled with poison” (they aren’t), are “unnecessary” (they are very necessary if you want to avoid life-threatening vaccine preventable diseases), don’t work (they do work), and that outbreaks are a “manufactured problem” (what???).

Vaccines are safe and necessary. Don’t let folks like Larry Cook scare you away from vaccinating and protecting your kids.

More on Larry Cook

How Are Vaccines Related to News About Food Recalls and Food Poisoning?

Do you ever think about vaccines when you think about food recalls?

How about when you think about food poisoning?

Well, maybe you should, after all, we do have vaccines to prevent hepatitis A infections and typhoid fever, both are which can be spread through contaminated food.

How Are Vaccines Related to News About Food Recalls and Food Poisoning?

That’s not exactly what we were talking about though…

Anti-vaccine folks have a new conspiracy theory about food recalls and food poisoning.
Surprise! Anti-vaccine folks have a new conspiracy theory about food recalls and food poisoning. How often do these types of posts correlate with the truth? What do you guys think? Zero?

That’s right, some folks think that the recent food recalls are correlated to vaccines. They are “creating a market” for a new Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine!

“We evaluated the extent of attenuation and immunogenicity of the ΔlppAB and ΔlppAB ΔmsbB mutants of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium when delivered to mice by the oral route.”

Erova et al on Protective Immunity Elicited by Oral Immunization of Mice with Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Braun Lipoprotein (Lpp) and Acetyltransferase (MsbB) Mutants

At least they are if mice are monitoring our outbreaks and are in the market for a Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium vaccine?

How would that work anyway? No, not mice watching the news and ordering vaccines…

Do they actually think that someone is contaminating our food with Salmonella bacteria so that folks will want these vaccines, when they become available?

Food poisoning is horrible!

Whether it is for Listeria, Salmonella, or E. coli, it likely won’t be very hard to get folks vaccinated, if and when they become available.

More on Propaganda About Vaccines and Food Recalls