Tag: alternative vaccine schedules

Are You on the Fence About Vaccines?

If you have doubts about vaccinating your kids, but you are still doing research, then you are probably what people like to call a fence sitter.

On the Fence About Vaccines

Folks who are on the fence haven’t made a decision yet and are torn between what they see as two difficult options.

In this case, the two options we are talking about are:

  1. vaccinate your kids
  2. don’t vaccinate your kids

What makes those options difficult?

If you spend a little time on the Internet, those two options get complicated quickly and can turn into:

  1. vaccinate your kids – exposing them to toxins and all kinds of vaccine-induced diseases, from autism to SIDS
  2. don’t vaccinate your kids – risking a deadly disease because they are unvaccinated or the possibility that someone will come and force you to get them vaccinated

How do you figure out the truth to help you make the right decision for your family?

The Truth Behind Your Vaccine Decision

Most parents vaccinate their kids on time and on schedule.

These books about vaccines can help with your research about vaccinating and protecting your family.
These vaccine books can help you make the right decision if you are on the fence about vaccines.

Do they all have a hard time making their decision?

Most don’t.

They understand the risks their children face if they aren’t vaccinated.

“When a well-meaning parent like Jenny McCarthy blames vaccines for her child’s autism, placing the fear of God into every parent who has a baby, it’s not only irresponsible – it’s dangerous. Why? It’s simple math: vaccines are less effective when large numbers of parents opt out. And the more who opt out, the less protected ALL our children are.

Celebrity books come and go . . . but the anxiety they create lives on in pediatricians’ offices across the country. A small, but growing number of parents are even lying about their religious beliefs to avoid having their children vaccinated, thanks in part to the media hysteria created by this book.”

Ari Brown, MD responding to Jenny McCarthy appearing on Oprah

That’s not to say that they don’t think about their decision to vaccinate their kids. Or even think twice about it.

But in the end, they know that:

  • vaccines work – even if they aren’t perfect and waning immunity is an issue with a few vaccines
  • vaccines are safe – even if they do have some side effects, which can rarely be severe
  • vaccines are necessary – without them, we would end up in like it was in the pre-vaccine era, even with modern health care, nutrition, and sanitation, etc.

And they know that their decision might affect others around them.

If your research about vaccines has pushed you off the wrong side of the fence and into your pediatrician’s office with a copy of Dr. Bob’s vaccine book demanding an alternative immunization schedule, then you might want to do a little more research.

Misinformed Consent

Most importantly, parents who choose to vaccinate their kids don’t believe the myths and conspiracy theories that might lead them to skip or delay any recommended vaccines.

“If you see a turtle sitting on top of a fence post, it didn’t get there by accident.”

President Bill Clinton

Ironically, the anti-vaccine “experts” and websites that scare some parents often talk about choice and informed consent.

Understand though, that by exaggerating the risks of vaccines and vaccine injury (no, vaccines are not full of toxins), playing down the risks of vaccine-preventable diseases (no, they are not mild diseases that should be thought of as a rite of passage), and ignoring the benefits of vaccines (yes, vaccines do work), they are violating the basic tenets of informed consent themselves.

And that limits your ability to make the right choice for your family.

Making the Right Decision About Vaccines

There is nothing wrong with asking questions and being skeptical about the answers you get.

No one wants to return to the days when reports of measles epidemics made the front page of the New York Times.
No one wants to return to the days when reports of measles epidemics made the front page of the New York Times.

With all of the things you see and hear about vaccines, there is nothing wrong with being a little scared and wanting to do more research, instead of blindly following the advice of your pediatrician.

But remember that if you are going to be skeptical and are not going to blindly follow the advice of someone you know and maybe trust, then don’t blindly believe everything you read on the Internet that says vaccines are bad.

“My husband and I agreed we would just not have our new baby vaccinated until she was at least 1 year old, which seemed like enough time to continue looking for information. Also, we were not concerned that she was at risk of contracting any serious childhood illnesses.

We were wrong.

A week before our baby girl’s first birthday, she was feverish and listless. When she refused to nurse for 24 hours, I took her to see our pediatrician. She was hurriedly admitted to intensive care with the diagnosis of spinal meningitis caused by Haemophilus influenzae, type B, which is a vaccine-preventable disease.”

Suzanne Walther on A Parent’s Decision on Immunization: Making the Right Choice

Suzanne Walther discovered that “it is easy for parents to be misinformed. It is a real challenge to be well informed.”

What questions did she want answers to?

  • Are vaccines really effective at preventing diseases? – Yes, although they aren’t 100% effective, vaccines do work well at preventing and controlling 16 different vaccine-preventable diseases on our childhood immunization schedule. And yes, vaccines did help eliminate smallpox and herd immunity is real.
  • How are vaccines made? – Vaccines are made in a multi-step process that begins with generating the antigens that will go in the vaccine and then moves to releasing and isolating the antigen from the growth medium, purifying the antigen, strengthening and stabilizing the vaccine, and then combining it all into the final vaccine. Unlike videos you may have seen on the Internet, there is nothing scary about this very scientific process.
  • Are they tested for safety? – Vaccines are extensively tested in Phase I, II, and III trials before they are approved and added to the immunization schedule. This entire vaccine development process may take as long as 10 to 15 years.
  • Are there ongoing clinical trials to rule out the possibility that vaccines cause diseases later in life? – Yes, after vaccines are approved and are added to the immunization schedule, ongoing Phase IV studies continue to monitor their safety and efficacy. In addition, Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), the Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment (CISA) Project, and the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD) help make sure vaccines are safe after they are approved.
  • Have allegations of adverse reactions been studied and confirmed or refuted? – Yes. In addition to several Institute of Medicine Vaccine reports, study after study have shown that vaccines don’t cause autism, SIDS, ASIA, or any of the other vaccine induced diseases “they” come up with.
  • And, last but not least, where can I get truthful, clear answers to my questions? – In addition to your pediatrician, there are plenty of vaccine books, sites, and groups that can help you get educated about vaccines.

Today, she might also have had questions about package inserts, aluminum, MTHFR mutations, shedding, vaccine mandates, the CDC Whistleblower, and the HPV vaccine. These and a hundred more have been answered over and over again.

Suzanne Walther learned about vaccines the hard way – after her infant contracted Hib meningitis, a vaccine-preventable disease. She also discovered that you can sometimes delay or wait too long to vaccinate your child.

What will you do to be well informed and to make sure you are making the right choice?

What to Know If You Are on the Fence About Vaccines

It is easy to be misinformed about vaccines, especially if you are on the fence and aren’t sure what to do. Get educated and and be sure you are making the right decision for your family.

More About One the Fence About Vaccines

Worst Vaccine Books

There are many books to help you get educated about vaccines and avoid getting influenced by vaccine scare stories and anti-vaccine talking points.

Some can even help you understand why you are afraid of vaccines.

Worst Vaccine Books

Unfortunately, if you simply search Amazon for books about vaccines, you are going to be hit with a list of anti-vaccine books. These include books that push their own made-up, so-called alternative immunization schedules and use misinformation about vaccines to scare you away from vaccinating and protecting your kids.

“Robert Sears became interested in vaccines as a medical student after reading “DPT: A Shot in the Dark,” a 1985 book that argued that the whooping cough vaccine was dangerous… Sears said the book, which helped spark a backlash against vaccines, exposed him to ideas he wasn’t hearing in school.”

Paloma Esquivel on Vaccination controversy swirls around O.C.’s ‘Dr. Bob’

While it is obvious that some are anti-vaccine, with stories about wild conspiracy theories, and that they have no scientific basis for their recommendations, it is also easy to see how others can fool parents, not knowing that the books “rely on the same tired old fallacious arguments that have been heard before and rejected by knowledgeable scientists.”

“…the book is also dangerous in the way in which it validates the pervasive myths that are currently scaring parents into making ill-informed decisions for their children.”

John Snyder on Cashing In On Fear: The Danger of Dr. Sears

These books, which are often described as anti-vaccine, include:

  • Alfred Russel Wallace played a big role in the antivaccination movement in the late 19th Century.
    Many of today’s anti-vaccine books use the same arguments from the 19th century anti-vaccine movement.

    The Big Autism Cover-Up: How and Why the Media Is Lying to the American Public by Anne Dachel

  • The Business of Baby: What Doctors Don’t Tell You, What Corporations Try to Sell You, and How to Put Your Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Baby Before Their Bottom Line by Jennifer Margulis
  • Callous Disregard: Autism and Vaccines–The Truth Behind a Tragedy by Andrew Wakefield and Jenny McCarthy
  • Dissolving Illusions: Disease, Vaccines, and The Forgotten History by Suzanne Humphries MD
  • Don’t Vaccinate Before You Educate by Mayer Eisenstein
  • DPT: A Shot in the Dark by Harris L. Coulter and Barbara Loe Fisher
  • Dr. Mary’s Monkey: How the Unsolved Murder of a Doctor, a Secret Laboratory in New Orleans and Cancer Causing Monkey Viruses are Linked to Lee Harvey Oswald, the JFK Assassination and Emerging Global Epidemics by Edward T. Haslam
  • Emerging Viruses: AIDS and Ebola: Nature, Accident or Intentional? by Leonard Horowitz
  • Evidence of Harm by David Kirby
  • Fowl! Bird Flu: It’s Not What You Think, by Sherri Tenpenny, D.O.
  • Germs, Biological Warfare, Vaccinations: What you Need to Know by Gary Null
  • Healing and Preventing Autism: A Complete Guide by Jenny McCarthy and Dr. Jerry Kartzinel
  • Healing Our Autistic Children: A Medical Plan for Restoring Your Child’s Health Paperback by Julie A. Buckley
  • Horrors of Vaccination Exposed and Illustrated by Chas. M. Higgins, M.D.
  • How to Prevent Autism: Expert Advice from Medical Professionals by Dara Berger
  • Jabbed: How the Vaccine Industry, Medical Establishment and Government Stick It to You and Your Family by Brett Wilcox and Kent Heckenlively J.D.
  • Lethal Injections Why Immunizations Don’t Work and the Damage they Cause, by William Douglass, M.D
  • Louder Than Words: A Mother’s Journey in Healing Autism by Jenny McCarthy
  • Miller’s Review of Critical Vaccine Studies: 400 Important Scientific Papers Summarized for Parents and Researchers by Neil Z. Miller
  • Melanie’s Marvelous Measles by Stephanie Messenger
  • Mother Warriors: A Nation of Parents Healing Autism Against All Odds by Jenny McCarthy
  • Queer Blood: The Secret AIDS Genocide Pit, by Alan Cantwell, M.D.
  • Raising a Vaccine Free Child, by Wendy Lydall
  • The Sanctity of Human Blood: Vaccination is Not Immunization, by Tim O’Shea, D.C.
  • Saying No to Vaccines: A Resource Guide For All Ages, by Sherri Tenpenny, D.O.
  • Shaken Baby Syndrome Diagnosis on Shaky Ground, by Viera Scheibner, Ph.D.
  • Some Call it AIDS: I Call it Murder, The Connection Between Cancer, AIDS, Immunizations, and Genocide, by Eva Snead M.D.
  • Thimerosal: Let the Science Speak: The Evidence Supporting the Immediate Removal of Mercury–a Known Neurotoxin–from Vaccines by Jr. Robert F. Kennedy and Mark Hyman M.D.
  • Vaccination: 100 Years of Orthodox Research Shows Vaccinations are a Medical Assault on the Immune System by Viera Scheibner, Ph.D.
  • Vaccine A: The Covert Government Experiment That’s Killing Our Soldiers – And Why GIs Are Only the First Victims by Gary Matsumoto, Ph.D.
  • The Vaccine Book: Making the Right Decision for Your Child (Sears Parenting Library) by Robert Sears, MD
  • Vaccine Epidemic: How Corporate Greed, Biased Science, and Coercive Government Threaten Our Human Rights, Our Health, and Our Children by Louise Kuo Habakus and Mary Holland
  • The Vaccine-Friendly Plan: Dr. Paul’s Safe and Effective Approach to Immunity and Health-from Pregnancy Through Your Child’s Teen Years by Paul Thomas M.D. and Jennifer Margulis
  • Vaccine Illusion by Tetyana Obukhanych
  • Vaccine Safety Manual for Concerned Families and Health Practitioners by Neil Z. Miller
  • Vaccine Whistleblower: Exposing Autism Research Fraud at the CDC by Esq. Kevin Barry and Dr. Boyd E. Haley
  • Vaccines 2.0: The Careful Parent’s Guide to Making Safe Vaccination Choices for Your Family by Mark Blaxill and Dan Olmsted
  • Vaccines: A Reappraisal by Richard Moskowitz MD and Mary Holland
  • Vaccines Are They Really Safe and Effective? by Neil Z. Miller
  • Vaccines: An Ounce of Prevention? Or a Pound of Death? by Keidi Obi Awadu
  • Vaccines Are Dangerous: A Warning to the Black Community by Yoshua Barak
  • Vaccines: The Risks, the Benefits, the Choices, a Resource Guide for Parents by Sherri Tenpenny, D.O.
  • The Virus and the Vaccine: Contaminated Vaccine, Deadly Cancers, and Government Neglect by Debbie Bookchin and Jim Schumacher
  • What The Pharmaceutical Companies Don’t Want You To Know About Vaccines by Todd Elsner, D.C.
  • When Your Doctor Is Wrong, Hepatitis B Vaccine and Autism by Judy Converse, M.P.H., R.D
  • What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Children’s Vaccinations by Stephanie Cave, M.D.

Most parents will likely have few illusions of what these books are really about, even after simply reading the titles or seeing the names of the authors.  For the rest, just read some of the reviews below.

And if you are looking for books to help you make the right decision about vaccinating your kids, try these other vaccine books instead.

What To Know About the Worst Vaccine Books

These vaccine books, many of which are featured on Amazon, mostly rely on the same arguments that vaccines are full of toxins that will poison your kids, that vaccines don’t even work, and that vaccines aren’t even necessary. They are just what you need if you are looking for help to justify your decision to not vaccinate your kids.

More Information on the Worst Vaccine Books:

Homeopathic Vaccines Don’t Work or Why You Shouldn’t Take Immunization Advice from a Homeopath

Get your gourmet coffee on aisle 4 and homeopathic 'medicines' on aisle 3 at your favorite grocery stores or pharmacies.
After you get your gourmet coffee, hop over one aisle and get a homeopathic remedy for sleeplessness (Coffea cruda 3X to 30X – 3C to 30C HPUS) at your favorite grocery store or pharmacy.

Most parents who follow a non-standard, parent-selected, delayed protection vaccine schedule do at least give their kids real vaccines.

Does that mean that some don’t?

Yes, homeopathic vaccines are a thing.

Homeopathy 101 for Parents

Many parents get their first introduction to homeopathy when they go to the pharmacy to buy over-the-counter medicines when their baby is teething or has their first cold.

However, since there aren’t any real symptomatic medicines for infants and younger children to treat coughs and colds or even teething, that leaves parents to buy stuff like Hyland’s Baby Teething Tablets, Boiron Cold Calm, or Similasan Kids Cough & Fever Relief.

Most don’t really understand that they are buying homeopathic products – pharmacies, and the pharmacy section of grocery stores, typically sell homeopathic products right alongside real medicine.

“They are nothing but placebos, magic potions based on prescientific notions and with “active ingredients” that are often diluted beyond the point where any original substance is likely to remain. Homeopathic products are therefore literally nothing. Further, clinical trials have consistently shown that they do not, in fact, work.”

Steven Novella

Hopefully, this first introduction will end up being the last time they try homeopathy.

Using principles of shaking and “like cures like” and “the law of the minimum dose,” homeopathy doesn’t work and is not even regulated by the FDA.

Ironically, Samuel Hahnemann, the doctor who made up homeopathy, used Jenner’s smallpox vaccine as an example of his “like cures like” principle. And Hahnemann seemed to support Jenner’s vaccine!

Homeopathic Vaccines Don’t Work

What about homeopathic vaccines, or so called nosodes?

Some parents wanting to skip or delay their child’s vaccines are going so far as to not just look for an alternative immunization schedule, but a complete alternative to standard vaccines.

Should they try homeopathic vaccines?

“Nosodes are essentially diseased tissue or pus diluted out of existence and then the resulting water given to prevent the disease from which the tissue originates. It’s witchcraft.”

Steven Novella

Homeopathic vaccines don’t work.

Of course, when you look at the science, it is biologically implausible that they would. How would ultra-dilutions of the saliva from a rabid skunk (like cures like) prevent or cure rabies?

And of course, it has never been shown that nosodes work.

One can certainly see the appeal of a homeopathic vaccine schedule though.

No shots.

And no side effects, since your baby is basically drinking water (or sometimes alcohol) or eating a sugar pill (can they cause cavities?).

Unfortunately, there is also no protection from any vaccine-preventable diseases either.

That’s why you shouldn’t take immunization advice from a homeopath. They are not immunization experts…

What To Know About Homeopathic Vaccines

Homeopathic vaccines or nosodes do not work and will not provide any protection for your children against any vaccine preventable diseases.

More on Nosodes and Homeopathic Vaccines

Paleo Vaccine Schedule

What would the nomadic hunters and gatherers of the Upper Paleolithic think of using vaccines if they were available to them?
What would the nomadic hunters and gatherers of the Upper Paleolithic think of using vaccines if they were available to them?

Bob Sears might have one of the most popular non-standard, parent-selected, delayed protection vaccine schedules that leave kids at risk for vaccine-preventable diseases, but he wasn’t the first to come up with the idea.

His schedule sure did seem to open up the floodgate for others though.

Everyone with a blog now thinks that they can create their own vaccine schedule.

Don’t believe me?

In addition to both versions of the Sears’ schedule, his alternative and his selective versions, we also have:

  • a homeopathic immunization schedule – wait until six months and then start giving nosodes every five days
  • the Stephanie Cave schedule – starts at 4 months
  • the Donald Miller user friendly vaccination schedule – starts at age 2 years
  • a vaccine friendly plan
  • the Dr Jay schedule – one vaccine at a time and wait until they are ‘developmentally solid’ until they get the MMR
  • the chiropractor immunization plan

And now there is even a Paleo vaccine schedule.

Paleo Vaccine Schedule

That there is a Paleo vaccine schedule is probably a big surprise for people, especially those who understand anything about the Paleo diet, but it will also help you understand how most folks pull these immunization schedules out of their hats.

“Proponents of the Paleo diet follow a nutritional plan based on the eating habits of our ancestors in the Paleolithic period, between 2.5 million and 10,000 years ago.”

Ferris Jabr on How to Really Eat Like a Hunter-Gatherer: Why the Paleo Diet Is Half-Baked

So do proponents of the Paleo vaccine schedule follow an immunization plan based on the vaccinating habits of our ancestors in the Paleolithic period, between 2.5 million and 10,000 years ago?

As most folks can guess, that would be hard to do, as there weren’t any vaccines back then. Even variolation against smallpox probably didn’t start until about 1000 CE.

So the Paleo vaccine schedule, which advocates for giving your infant one vaccine at a time starting with the DTaP at six months, really has nothing to do with being Paleo. Unless of course, you consider that it will leave your kids unprotected from vaccine-preventable diseases, just like we were in the Paleolithic period, between 2.5 million and 10,000 years ago.

It is a good reminder that all of these so-called alternative vaccine schedules are really just made up schedules without any evidence to show that they will reduce side effects. And that these schedules have no evidence that they will even protect your kids from vaccine preventable diseases.

“As far back as the Paleolithic age, humans have lived in close proximity with animals, associating not only with those they could domesticate but also with wild and dangerous beasts. Encounters contained an element of risk, for humans were injured or killed as much as nourished or entertained. The enigmatic portrayal of large, wild beasts on the walls and ceiling at Lascaux suggests a complex early relationship that went beyond the necessities of food or fiber. In our time, interaction with animals continues to encompass cohabitation at all levels, including the microbial. Encounters, compounded by increased travel and trade, still involve risks as well as benefits. And even though we are less likely to be injured or killed by animals, the exotic pathogens living and traveling with them counterbalance amusement and companionship with illness and death.”

Polyxeni Potter on Paleolithic Murals and the Global Wildlife Trade

So where do vaccines fit into a Paleo lifestyle? They fit in very well if you want to get protected from vaccine-preventable diseases.

What To Know About The Paleo Vaccine Schedule

Like other non-standard, parent-selected, delayed protection vaccine schedules, the Paleo vaccine schedule is a made-up alternative to the standard immunization schedule and will leave your kids unprotected from vaccine preventative diseases.

More About the Paleo Vaccine Schedule

How the Anti-Vaccine Movement Hurts Autistic Families

Many people see Jenny McCarthy battling doctors to save or recover her son as being anti-autism.
Many people see Jenny McCarthy battling doctors to save or recover her son as being anti-autism.

People have different reasons for skipping or delaying vaccines.

Some are simply scared of things they have heard from friends or family members – the common anti-vaccine myths and misinformation that float around on Facebook.

Others feel that either they or someone in their family has been a victim of a vaccine injury. While vaccine injuries are real, as no vaccine is 100% safe, these injuries almost certainly don’t occur as often as some people think they do.

Consequences of the Anti-Vaccine Movement

Although the anti-vaccine movement has been around as long as there have been vaccines, we are starting to see new consequences.

In addition to harming herd immunity levels and triggering outbreaks, by pushing their anti-vaccine ideas, many of these folks often hurt autistic families too.

How the Anti-Vaccine Movement Hurts Autistic Families

Many people think that the anti-vaccine message is anti-autism.

“Autism, as I see it, steals the soul from a child…”

Dr. Jerry Kartzinel writing in the introduction to Jenny McCarthy’s first autism book Louder Than Words

Why?

In addition to the imagery of a soulless child, Jenny McCarthy said multiple times that it would be better to have a life threatening vaccine-preventable disease instead of autism. Folks would line up for it she said.

This “deficit model” of thinking about autism, “which focuses almost exclusively on impairments and limitations, ultimately leads us to see autistic individuals as broken people who are ill and, as my child’s first psychologist explained, need to be fixed.”

“I look at autism like a bus accident, and you don’t become cured from a bus accident, but you can recover.”

Jenny McCarthy

Hopefully, no one looks at their autistic child and thinks about a child in a bus accident, or a child who has lost their soul, been kidnapped by autism, or that they have a damaged child.  That kind of thinking is offensive to many, and hopefully more and more people.

Other reasons the anti-vaccine message is often seen as anti-autism include that:

  • Anti-vaccine/anti-autism rhetoric might get in the way of a parent accepting their child’s diagnosis of autism.
  • They push expensive, often unproven, sometimes disproven, and dangerous  non-evidence based biomedical treatments and cures on hopeful parents of autistic kids. Things like bleach enemas (miracle medical solution), chemical castration with Lupron, hyperbaric oxygen chambers, chelation, restrictive diets, stem cell therapy, raw camel milk, vitamin supplements, antifungal drugs for Candida, secretin injections, and so on, etc.
  • They waste resources. Every dollar that is spent defending vaccines, refuting an antivaccine study, controlling an outbreak, or on a MAPS doctor (the new DAN! doctors), is a dollar that cannot be invested in the needs of actually autistic people and their families.
  • They lead others from understanding that “communicating a strengths-based approach to autism may not only afford autistic patients the respect and dignity they deserve, but may also help family members better understand and support their loved ones.”
  • It leads to ableist messaging when we respond to anti-vaccine fears by saying “don’t worry, vaccines don’t cause autism” without pointing out that “autism and neurodiversity are far from the worst things that could happen to a parent.”

The anti-vaccine movement also harms the relationship many of these parents have with their pediatrician (who they characterize as vaccine pushers controlled by Big Pharma), pushing them to alternative providers who will be more likely to pander to their fears about vaccines and allow their kids to follow a non-standard, parent-selected, delayed protection vaccine schedule. These are often the same types of providers who push biomed treatments, instead of more standard therapies that a pediatrician or neurologist might recommend, who would also be more likely to explain that “autistic children can and do exhibit improvement in their symptoms simply through growth and development.”

And of course, in addition to being anti-autism, the anti-vaccine movement is typically anti-science.

Sarah Kurchak sums it up well in her recent article, Here’s How the Anti-Vaccination Movement Hurts Autistic People, saying that “The anti-vaccine argument is wrong in both the scientific and moral sense.”

“A huge thing for parents in the anti-vaccine movement is the emotional support. The talk of cures and biomedical interventions is almost secondary to the feeling of connectedness with other parents. A lot of the appeal of the community is just being able to talk to people who can relate to what you’ve been through.”

Seth Mookin author of The Panic Virus

It is certainly understandable to want and need support, but parents of autistic children should know that they can get that support from other parents who don’t think that their child is damaged.

In advocating for vaccines, I refuse to stigmatize autistic people.
In advocating for vaccines, I refuse to stigmatize autistic people. I will use neurodiversity over ableist messaging.

What To Know About the Anti-Vax Movement Hurting Autistics

Autism is not vaccine damage. Instead of a deficit model, it is best seen through a neurodiversity model, which “sees autistic individuals as possessing a complex combination of cognitive strengths and challenges.”

More on How Anti-Vax Movement Hurts Autistic Families

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Parents Who Regret Not Vaccinating Their Kids

My uncle got polio just before the vaccine was developed. He was hospitalized for six months, almost didn't survive, and lived with atrophied muscles in one of his legs.
My uncle got polio just before the vaccine was developed. He was hospitalized for six months, almost didn’t survive, and lived with atrophied muscles in one of his legs.

A rather strange anti-vaccine argument you might sometimes hear is that you can’t unvaccinate your kids (even though they push detox plans that say they do exactly that), so go ahead and wait to vaccinate them until you have “done your research” and are sure.

The problem with that argument, like most others that anti-vaccine folks use to justify their decisions to skip or delay vaccines, is that you can wait too long.

“In 1736 I lost one of my sons, a fine boy of four years old, by the smallpox taken in the common way. I long regretted bitterly and still regret that I had not given it to him by inoculation. This I mention for the sake of the parents who omit that operation, on the supposition that they should never forgive themselves if a child died under it; my example showing that the regret may be the same either way, and that, therefore, the safer should be chosen.”

Benjamin Franklin Autobiography

Tragically, Ben Franklin wasn’t the last parent to regret not vaccinating his child.

More Parents Who Regret Not Vaccinating Their Kids

Roald Dahl, who famously wrote Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, is less well known for having a daughter who died of measles. It was just before the measles vaccine came out, so he didn’t regret not vaccinating her, but in urging other parents to protect their children, he did seem to regret that a vaccine wasn’t yet available.

For many other parents, a vaccine was available that could have kept their kids from getting sick.

“In 1989, the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine was relatively new and not yet routine. I was aware of the vaccine’s availability, but, busy mom that I was, I had not yet made the trip to the health department to get the immunization for my two-year-old daughter, Sarah. I will always regret that bit of procrastination and the anguish that it caused.”

Peggy Archer

Some of them have shared their personal stories, including the parents of:

  • Abby Peterson‘s “pediatrician steered her away from vaccinating her daughter” against chickenpox and her mother, Duffy Peterson, now says that “she wishes she had questioned the doctor’s recommendations more forcefully.” Abby died of a chicken pox infection.
  • Emily Lastinger who was unvaccinated and died of flu.
  • After all seven of her unvaccinated kids caught whooping cough, this parent regretted not having them vaccinated.
  • Claire Noelle Bakke who got pertussis when she was five weeks old
  • Scarlet Anne Taylor who died of the flu during the 2014-15 flu season
  • this unvaccinated three year old who spent six days in the hospital (part of it in a slight coma, during which they weren’t sure he would survive) with Haemophilus influenzae type b epiglottitis
  • Abigail who was unvaccinated and died of invasive pneumococcal disease
  • these two unvaccinated kids who developed severe dehydration from rotavirus infections
  • Sarah who was unvaccinated and developed a croupy cough when she was two-years-old and ended up on a ventilator with Haemophilus influenzae type b epiglottitis
  • Ashley who died from the flu and had never gotten a flu shot
  • Evan who died of a vaccine-preventable disease because his mom was not told about the vaccine that could have prevented it

There is another group of parents who have regrets about vaccines. Those parents whose kids can’t be vaccinated (too young to be vaccinated, have cancer, or have another medical exemption, etc.) are put at risk and exposed to vaccine-preventable diseases by intentionally unvaccinated kids. These parents typically regret that those around them don’t get vaccinated and protected.

Your decision to get educated and vaccinate your family shouldn’t be based on fear or concerns of regret if you delay or skip any vaccines, but these types of personal stories are important to review, especially if you also hear, watch, or read any stories about vaccine injuries.

What To Know About Regretting Not Vaccinating Your Kids

Delaying or skipping one or more vaccines isn’t safer or healthier, it just puts your child at increased of catching the vaccine-preventable diseases the vaccines protect you against and might lead to feelings of regret if you wait too long.

More On Parents Who Regret Not Vaccinating Their Kids

Catch-Up Immunization Schedules

It is surprisingly easy to get behind on your child’s immunizations, even if you are trying to stay on schedule.

How do you miss a shot?

Your child could have been sick when they were supposed to get their vaccines, your pediatrician might have been out of one or more vaccines, or you might have simply missed one of your child’s well checkups.

Catching Up On Vaccines

A catch-up immunization schedule
A catch-up vaccination schedule program can help you figure out when to get the vaccines your child has missed.

If your child gets behind and misses one or more vaccines, be sure to get caught up as soon as possible.

If your child needs to get caught up quickly, like to start daycare or school, to travel out of the country, or because of a disease outbreak in your area, you can even use an accelerated immunization schedule, using minimum intervals between doses.

Depending on your child’s age, you might even be able to skip a few doses or vaccines.

For example, with rotavirus vaccines, vaccination should not be started if an infant is already 15 weeks old and the final dose must be given by 8 months of age.

And if your child gets their first dose of Hib after they are 15 months old, they don’t need any more doses. And they wouldn’t need any doses at all if they are already 5 years old.

Prevnar, IPV, and DTaP might also need to given on an alternative schedule when given on a catch-up schedule.

Specifically, your child might be able to skip:

  • the fifth dose of the DTaP vaccine, if the fourth dose was given at age 4 years or older.
  • the fourth dose of the IPV vaccine, if the third dose was given at age 4 years or older.
  • one or more doses of Prevnar, depending on when the other doses were given

Is this a good way to get out of getting some doses or vaccines?

Of course not. In addition to missing out on those vaccines, your child is missing out on the protection from those vaccines.

For More Information on Catch-Up Immunization Schedules