Tag: pseudoscience

Sharyl Attkisson’s Full Measure Vaccine Debate Bombshell

A bombshell about vaccines from Sharyl Attkisson?

To be fair, even Sharyl Attkisson doesn't go so far as to talk about a CIA cover-up over vaccines or a banned video. That's just something extra that Natural News threw in to make her story sound even scarier.
To be fair, even Sharyl Attkisson doesn’t go so far as to talk about a CIA cover-up over vaccines or a banned video. That’s just something extra that the Health Ranger threw in to make her story sound even scarier.

The only bombshell that’s dropping about Sharyl Attkisson is that someone hasn’t gotten fired yet for putting her show on TV.

Sharyl Attkisson’s Full Measure Vaccine Debate Bombshell

To be fair, it’s a bit of a stretch to say that her show, Full Measure, is “on TV.”

“Full Measure is broadcast to 43 million households in 79 markets on 162 Sinclair Broadcast Group stations, including ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, CW, MyTV, Univision and Telemundo affiliates.”

The show appears at various times on various channels, kind of like an infomercial. And these stations, owed by Sinclair Broadcasting Group, have to run the show.

The show isn’t really on ABC, NBC, or even FOX or CW… It is only on affiliate stations that Sinclair Broadcast Group owns.

And like an infomercial, it seems like Sharyl Attkisson has something to sell.

There is nothing new in Sharyl Attkisson's report or techniques.
There is nothing new in Sharyl Attkisson’s report or techniques.

Unfortunately, some folks are still buying it

You shouldn’t. Vaccines are safe and necessary and certainly aren’t associated with autism.

More on Sharyl Attkisson’s Full Measure Vaccine Debate Bombshell

How to Become a Vaccine Advocate

Are you tired of reading about outbreaks that might put your family at risk, either because they are too young to be vaccinated, fully vaccinated, or because they have a true medical condition that keeps them from being vaccinated?

Brittney Kara, who once wondered why vaccines weren’t mentioned in the Bible, gets a lot of other things wrong too.

Are you especially tired of reading about these outbreaks while friends and family members post anti-vaccine propaganda on Facebook that you know isn’t true?

How to Become a Vaccine Advocate

It is time to speak up and speak out against anti-vaccine misinformation.

It’s time to become a vaccine advocate.

Most importantly, post and share stories when you or your family get a vaccine!

Share your #flushotselfie and let folks know you got vaccinated and protected.
Share your #flushotselfie and let folks know you got vaccinated and protected.

And be skeptical when you see or hear something that is anti-vaccine, especially when they are talking about toxins, vaccine-induced diseases, Big Pharma, vaccine choice, mandatory vaccination, the benefits of natural immunity, or when they are trying to sell you their books, videos, seminars, or supplements.

If nothing else, drop a link to the vaxopedia whenever someone posts something about vaccines that you just know isn’t true.

More on How to Become a Vaccine Advocate

What is Corvelva?

Have you heard of Corvelva?

People are dying of measles in Italy and groups like Corvela are pushing anti-vaccine propaganda to further scare folks away from vaccinating and protecting their bambini.
People are dying of measles in Italy and groups like Corvela are pushing anti-vaccine propaganda to further scare folks away from vaccinating and protecting their bambini.

Probably not, but they are getting some attention in the anti-vaccine world because they think that they have uncovered a Vaccingate!

What is Corvelva?

Specifically, they analyzed the Infranix Hexa vaccine, and instead of finding DTaP-IPV-HepB/Hib antigens, they think that they found “65 signs of chemical contaminants of which only 35% is known” and “7 chemical toxins.”

Should you be worried?

“Coming back to the two basic principles that have been our topic on this analysis path, we reaffirm what we have said in the recent interview on the scientific journal Nature: we are inquiring the vaccines efficacy and safety and we can’t quite understand how it is possible to claim that this vaccine is even able to generate the 6 protective antibodies – reason why it is designed for – and furthermore to understand how this cluster made of 6 neurotoxic antigens bound together can be claimed as not toxic for newborns.”

Corvelva on Vaccingate: Initial results on Infanrix Hexa chemical composition

Although they might not understand it, Infranix Hexa has been proven to be safe and has been proven to work. You can read study after study in well respected peer reviewed journals that say so.

The Corvela Vaccingate “study” wasn’t published in a well respected peer reviewed journal. It wasn’t even published in one of the typical bottom-feeder, pay-to-publish journals that anti-vaccine researchers frequently use.

What Corvela did was more like a very poorly done science fair project by a kid who got too much help from his anti-vaccine parents.

Using the Surface Activated Chemical Ionization-Electrospray-NIST Bayesian model database search (SANIST) platform is pretty cool, to be sure. But why are we supposed to believe that their method would actually deconstruct the Infanrix Hexa vaccine? Because that’s why they were trying to do – separate out all of the combined vaccine ingredients so that they could be detected by SANIST. The combined vaccine ingredients, including one of which is an emulsifier that keeps the ingredients from separating, in a 6-in-1 combination vaccine.

So what’s more likely? That the unnamed ‘scientists’ at Corvela, which is basically an anti-vaccine website in Italy, did the experiment wrong or that the Infanrix Hexa vaccine, which is used in countries all over the world, doesn’t contain any of the antigens that it is supposed to contain?

A previous study on vaccines that they also have posted to their website and to an open peer review site was not approved, getting a lot of criticism.

Have you figured out what Corvela stands for yet?

It’s Italian for covfefe.

More on Corvelva

Catching up on 17 Years Worth of Vaccinations to Attend College

With the passage of California’s new vaccination law, it is not just kids in daycare, kindergarten, and high school who have to be up-to-date on their immunizations.

“If I chose to attend Berkeley, I would have to catch up on 17 years worth of vaccinations.”

Madeline Scott

Many California universities strengthened their immunization requirements at about the same time as SB 277 passed.

Does that really mean that an unvaccinated, incoming freshman would have to get 17 years worth of vaccinations?

How To Catch Up On Missing Immunizations

Of course not. Teens don’t really need to get 17 years worth of vaccinations to get caught up, even if they had never had a single vaccine before.

Why not?

They are too old for some vaccines, like those for rotavirus, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (Prevnar).

And because they are starting so late, they would get fewer doses of a few vaccines, so most older teens could get fully caught up after getting just:

  • 1 dose of MCV4 (a meningococcal vaccine)
  • 2 or 3 doses of MenB (a meningococcal vaccine)
  • 2 doses of MMR
  • 2 doses of the chicken pox vaccine
  • 1 dose of Tdap, followed by 2 doses of Td (instead of the standard 5 doses of DTaP vaccine that younger children get, which is followed by a Tdap booster at age 12 years)
  • 2 doses of HepA
  • 3 doses of HepB
  • 3 doses of IPV (instead of the standard 4 doses of polio vaccine that younger children get)
  • 3 doses of HPV vaccine
  • a flu shot

How quickly could they get caught up?

Probably in about 8 months – the minimal interval between all of the Tdap/Td doses. Most of the rest of the vaccines can be given over a 6 month interval or even quicker.

Catching up on 17 Years Worth of Vaccinations to Attend College

Surprisingly, the University of California at Berkeley actually requires very few of these immunizations for new students though.

Students at Berkeley are much more likely to march for science than against it.
Students at Berkeley are much more likely to march for science than against it.

The only vaccines that are required include:

  • two doses of MMR
  • two doses of the chicken pox vaccine
  • one dose of the MCV4 meningococcal vaccine
  • one dose of Tdap

Using the combination vaccine ProQuad (MMR and chicken pox together), that could mean as few as 4 shots instead of “17 years worth of vaccinations.”

Of course, that leaves the student unprotected against a lot of vaccine-preventable diseases.

Other vaccines that are recommended, but not required, include those that can protect students against flu, hepatitis B, MenB, HPV, hepatitis A, polio, and pneumococcal bacteria (if high risk).

More On College Vaccine Requirements

Updated November 25, 2018

How the Anti-Vaccine Movement Takes Advantage of Dead Children and Their Parents

It is bad enough that folks in the anti-vaccine movement use propaganda to scare parents away from vaccinating and protecting their kids.

“The anti-vaccine argument is wrong in both the scientific and moral sense.”
Sarah Kurchak on Here’s How the Anti-Vaccination Movement Hurts Autistic People

Many people also think that the anti-vaccine message is anti-autism.

How the Anti-Vaccine Movement Takes Advantage of Dead Children and Their Parents

But just when you thought that they couldn’t go any lower, folks in the anti-vaccine movement find new ways to demonstrate their lacks of morals.

As a physician, I assure you this story isn’t believable at any level. In my opinion, the “health officials” are conjuring meningitis fairy tales about an “unvaccinated” boogeyman to cover for the much more probable cause of this child’s death: VACCINES.

The much more likely cause is right in front of us: “The child had just received his 4-month-old vaccinations two days beforehand.”

Jim Meehan

What is Dr. Jim Meehan talking about?

A four-month-old who recently died of bacterial meningitis in Chesterfield County, Virginia.

“Notice that THREE of the vaccines given at 4 months are for organisms capable of invading the brain and causing MENINGITIS. Rotavirus is a live virus vaccine capable of shedding from recently vaccinated children. The vaccine pre-clinical trials lacked placebo controls and were associated with infant deaths.

It doesn’t take my medical degree to understand how flimsy are the claims in this story.”

Jim Meehan

While rotavirus is a live virus vaccine, rotavirus rarely causes central nervous system disease. And he died of bacterial meningitis. It shouldn’t take a medical degree to know that rotavirus is a virus, not a bacteria.

While two of the other vaccines routinely given at four months do actually protect you from meningitis, both Prevnar and Hib are sub-unit vaccines, so can’t actually cause disease. Unfortunately, at four months, he would have been only partially protected against Prevnar and Hib, having only received two of four dosages of those vaccines.

“They expect the general public to be ignorant of the fact that we can actually measure the presence of the meningitis causing organisms for which there are vaccines: Haemophilus influenzae, Pneumococcus, and Meningococcus. So, where are the tests that confirm the presence of one of these “vaccine preventable” organisms?! Where’s the spinal tap/CSF pathology report?

As hard as it is for a grieving family to conceive of an autopsy, I pray the family demands a confirmation of the farcical cause of death being contrived in this case.”

Jim Meehan

Has Jim Meehan heard of HIPAA?

Does he read any of the other messages when he is writing his own comments about this family?

Why should this family have to come out and give an explanation for how their child died?
Why should this family have to come out and give an explanation for how their child died?

Is Jim Meehan really a doctor? It shouldn’t take a medical degree to understand that carriers of a disease don’t usually have symptoms of the disease.

“Again, from the article: “Health care officials told Dempsey they BELIEVE an unvaccinated person was carrying meningitis and Killy happened to come into contact with that person.”

They “believe”…give me a break. It should have said, “they made-up a story to cover for the real cause.”

SECOND, people don’t walk around with meningitis. They lay in their beds in a dark room and writhe in pain.

THIRD, the likelihood that an unvaccinated individual was walking around with meningitis is vanishingly small. To even list that in the top 100 options of a differential diagnosis is pure fiction.

FOURTH, where is this hypothetical unvaccinated meningitis shedding “patient zero?” He or she would have been so obviously sick that there is no way new parents would not remember the likely suspect…unless the suspect never existed.”

Jim Meehan

In this case, with a meningococcal infection, which is what the infant is thought to have, about 10% of people are carriers, asymptomatically having the Neisseria meningitidis bacteria in their nose or throat.

In the United States, we have two types of meningococcal vaccines, neither of which is routinely given to infants:

  • Menactra and Menveo – meningococcal conjugate vaccines that protect against serogroups A, C, W, Y and first given when kids are 11 to 12 years old, with a booster at age 16 years.
  • Bexsero and Trumenba – meningococcal conjugate vaccines that only  protect against serogroup B and can be given to kids at increased risk and teens and young adults who want to reduce their risk of getting MenB disease

The only other possibility, since they mentioned that exposed people received antibiotics, would be the Hib bacteria.

“In the prevaccine era, Hib could be isolated from the nasopharynx of 0.5%–3% of normal infants and children but was not common in adults.”

CDC on the Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

Again, these carriers can be contagious, even though they don’t have any symptoms.

“It’s likely that these “health officials” are covering for the pharmaceutical/vaccine industry that pays them so well. It’s “health officials” like this that for decades have pretended that sudden unexplained infant death syndrome (SUIDS), not only has no explanation, but it couldn’t possibly be related to the injection of neurotoxic doses of aluminum into the bodies of tiny baby humans. They can ignore the clustering of infant deaths that occurs around the same times that CDC recommends multiple (5-13) vaccines at one visit, but I won’t.”

Jim Meehan

Why is a family that just lost their child getting harassed by anti-vaccine folks?

This is the modern anti-vaccine movement.
This is the modern anti-vaccine movement.

One clue is that Jim Meehan is pushing the idea that there is a Big Pharma conspiracy behind this child’s death.

An anti-vaccine parenting group helping spread misinformation about this baby's death.
An anti-vaccine parenting group helping spread misinformation about this baby’s death.

And there are many anti-vaccine parenting groups that are helping spread his message around.

Of course, this isn’t the first time this has happened.

Anti-vaccine folks routinely hound parents who die of SIDS and shaken baby syndrome, working to convince them that vaccines caused their deaths.

Even infants who die of vitamin K deficiency bleeding because they skipped their baby’s vitamin K shot all of a sudden have a vaccine injury.

They turn every story of a child’s death or disability into a vaccine injury story.

Shame on them all.

More on the Vultures of the Anti-Vaccine Movement

Hierarchy of Evidence and Vaccine Papers

Evidence is evidence, right?

Nope.

There is a hierarchy of evidence, from weakest to strongest, that help folks make decisions about science and medicine.

That’s why you can’t just search Google or PubMed, read abstracts, and say that you have done your research.

Hierarchy of Evidence

For any study, you have to review and judge the quality of the evidence it provides.

A meta-analysis with over 1.2 million kids found that vaccines were not associated with autism, while Wakefield's retracted case series included only 12 children.
A meta-analysis with over 1.2 million kids found that vaccines were not associated with autism, while Wakefield’s retracted case series included only 12 children.

Is it a case report (a glorified anecdote), case series, or animal study (lowest quality evidence)?

Or a systemic review or meta-analyses (highest quality evidence)?

“The first and earliest principle of evidence-based medicine indicated that a hierarchy of evidence exists. Not all evidence is the same. This principle became well known in the early 1990s as practising physicians learnt basic clinical epidemiology skills and started to appraise and apply evidence to their practice. Since evidence was described as a hierarchy, a compelling rationale for a pyramid was made.”

Murad et al. on the New Evidence Pyramid

What about case control studies, cohort studies, and randomized controlled trials?

They lie somewhere in between on the hierarchy of evidence scale or pyramid.

And there are other factors to consider when judging the reliability of a study.

“Ultimately, the interpretation of the medical literature requires not only the understanding of the strengths and limitations of different study designs but also an appreciation for the circumstances in which the traditional hierarchy does not apply and integration of complementary information derived from various study designs is needed.”

Ho et al. on Evaluating the Evidence

For example, you might also have to take into account the sample size of the study.

A study can be underpowered if it doesn’t have enough subjects. Unfortunately, even an underpowered study will give you results. They likely won’t be statistically significant results, but folks don’t always realize that.

Even a meta-analysis, usually considered to be at the top of the hierarchy of evidence pyramid, can have problems that make their results less useful, such as not using appropriate inclusion criteria when selecting studies and leaving out important studies.

All in all, there are many factors to look at when reading a medical paper and considering if the results are valid and should influence what you do and how you think. This is especially true when looking at low quality vaccine papers, many of which the anti-vaccine movement uses to scare people, even though they are often poorly designed, and several of which have been retracted.

What to Know About the Hierarchy of Evidence

Learning about the hierarchy of evidence can help you better evaluate medical studies and vaccine papers and understand that there is more to doing your research about vaccines than searching PubMed and reading abstracts.

More on the Hierarchy of Evidence

 

Those Times Alternative Medicine Got It Wrong

Anti-vaccine folks like to use the fallacy that they don’t vaccinate their kids because sometimes science and doctors have been wrong in the past.

They instead turn to alternative medicine when their kids get sick and for their preventative care.

Those Times Alternative Medicine Got It Wrong

While it is true that science gets it wrong sometimes, these people seem to fail to consider that alternative medicine does too.

“…there’s no such thing as conventional or alternative or complementary or integrative or holistic medicine. There’s only medicine that works and medicine that doesn’t. And the best way to sort it out is by carefully evaluating scientific studies – not by visiting Internet chat rooms, reading magazine articles, or talking to friends.”

Paul Offit, MD on Do You Believe in Magic

More than that, they hardly ever get it right.

Remember the teen with osteosarcoma who died after he was treated with shark cartilage instead of chemotherapy?
Remember the teen with osteosarcoma who died after he was treated with shark cartilage instead of chemotherapy?

Need some examples?

  • Ayurvedic treatments can be contaminated with toxic metals
  • biomed treatments for autism – from restrictive diets and chelation to coffee and bleach enemas, these “cures” and treatments have not been shown to be safe, are sometimes known to be dangerous, and don’t even work
  • Cannabis Oil for kids with cancer – while marijuana-derived products might help some medical conditions, it doesn’t cure cancer
  • chiropractic neck manipulation of newborns and infants has no benefits and has caused deaths
  • chronic Lyme disease is not a recognized condition in modern medicine, but that doesn’t keep some ‘Lyme literate’ practitioners from recommending and charging patients for all sorts of unnecessary and sometimes harmful “treatments”
  • faith healing is still allowing children to die of very treatable conditions, from diabetes and appendicitis to common infections and premature babies
  • Gerson protocol – often discussed with other forms of cancer quackery this “radical nutritional program combined with purges (particularly coffee enemas)” is believed by some to cure cancer – it doesn’t
  • HIV denialism – yes, this is a thing, and tragically took the life of Christine Maggiore, her daughter, and many others who eventually died of AIDS
  • homemade baby formula – notorious for leaving out important nutrients, from iron vitamin D to enough calories for a growing baby
  • Hoxsey treatment – a natural treatment for cancer that has been around since the 1950s and has never been shown to work, except in people who never actually had cancer
  • laetrile for cancer – in the late-1970s, kids with treatable forms of cancer had parents who were convinced that this latest fad cure was better. It wasn’t.
  • naturopathy – although mostly looked at as a holistic alternative to other providers, some of these treatments include vitamin injections, hydrogen peroxide injections, and alternative cancer therapies
  • shark cartilage – this was the fad cancer cure in the 1990s that was killing kids who’s parents sought alternative cancer treatments. It didn’t work.

What’s the harm with these treatments?

Many, like Acupuncture, Homeopathy, Reiki, and Reflexology, etc., aren’t necessarily dangerous on their own. In fact, most don’t do anything at all, but they can lead people away from real treatments. And that essentially leaves people untreated.

Getting a fake treatment might not be a big deal when it is a condition that can go away on its own, like when Angelina Jolie talked about getting acupuncture when she had Bell’s Palsy, but it often leads to disastrous consequences when a life-threatening condition goes untreated.

Many people who push these alternative “treatments” often also recommend against standard treatments, like vitamin K shots for newborns, RhoGAM shots for their moms, and vaccines.

Those Times Anti-Vaccine Experts Got It Wrong

It shouldn’t be surprising that many of the folks who think that vaccines are dangerous, aren’t necessary, or that they don’t even work also believe in holistic or alternative treatments.

It also shouldn’t be surprising that they are also wrong a lot:

  • Meryl Dorey – equates vaccination with rape, something many of her followers aren’t even comfortable with
  • Mark and David Geier – this father and son pair are infamous for pushing a chemical castration treatment (Lupron) for autistic children, a treatment that led to Mark Geier losing his medical license (he’s a geneticist) in several states.
  • Jay Gordon, MD – once made the comment that “Heaven help us if we have a generation of kids who get a hepatitis B vaccine and a HPV vaccine and they think that now unprotected sex is okay…” Not surprisingly, studies have found that this doesn’t happen. In fact, teen pregnancy rates are at their lowest levels ever.
  • Suzanne Humphries, MD – a nephrologist who became a homeopath and now pushes anti-vaccine talking points, believes that vaccines don’t work and that polio never really disappeared, and that we don’t “see it anymore” because we changed its name to acute flaccid paralysis.
  • Robert F. Kennedy, Jr – continues to push the idea that thimerosal in vaccines is causing an autism epidemic.
  • Neil Z. Miller – a psychologist who has written many anti-vax books, gives lectures at chiropractic associations, and published his daughter’s book, Ambassadors Between Worlds, Intergalactic Gateway to a New Earth, which describes how they are both able to talk to intergalatic beings because she has been doing it for multiple lifetimes. No word yet if folks from the Pleiadians vaccinate their kids…
  • Tetyana Obukhanych, MD – the Harvard trained immunologist who believes that Immunology has no theoretical or evidence-based explanation for immunity.
  • Viera Scheibner – the micropaleontologist who thinks that getting a vaccine-preventable disease is good for kids, that vaccines are contaminated with amoebas, and that they cause SIDS and shaken baby syndrome
  • Bob Sears, MD – infamous for his alternative vaccine schedule that was never tested for safety or efficacy, he and now rallies folks against California’s new vaccine law
  • Stephanie Seneff – the MIT doctor (she has a doctorate in electrical engineering) who thinks that half of kids will have autism in eight years and that glyphosate causes everything from autism to school shootings and terrorist bombings.
  • Yehuda Shoenfeld, MD – an immunologist who heads the Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases and is on the scientific advisory board for the Children’s Medical Safety Research Institute. He is the latest to blame adjuvants for causing disease – his Autoimmune Syndrome Induced by Adjuvants (ASIA), which is often described as being a “basically a made-up syndrome that isn’t generally accepted.”
  • Sherri Tenpenny, DO – described as an anti-vax “expert” whose advise is “chock full of vaccine pseudoscience.” Once board certified in emergency medicine, Dr. Tenpenny now sells DVDs and supplements on her website, speaks at chiropractic health events, and provides holistic medical care. In a rant about freedom of choice in vaccination, she talks about General Robert E. Lee, Southern war hero and postwar icon of the “Lost Cause of the Confederacy,” the extinction of humanity, and about slavery and eight veils that must be pierced if you want to see what is really going on in the world – that the Illuninati and other secret organizations control us and that they are being controlled by time traveling dragons, lizards, and aliens.
  • Tim O’Shea, DC – a chiropractor, he speaks at anti-vax conferences and wrote an anti-vaccination book called The Sanctity of Human Blood: Vaccination is not Immunization. Dr. O’Shea does not believe that germs make us sick (germ theory denialism), thinks that vaccines cause peanut allergies, and he sells supplements and seminars.
  • Kelly Brogan, MD – a holistic psychiatric who recommends that patients wean off their prescribed medications and has talked about HIV denialism.
  • Erin Elizabeth – is pushing the idea that holistic practitioners are being murdered

And of course there is Andrew Wakefield – his scandal and MMR-autism fraud is well known.

Are these folks ever right?

Only if you buy into their anti-vaccine talking points.

What to Know About When Alternative Medicine Was Wrong

Alternative medicine is rarely right, and that can have life-threatening consequences when it leads folks to reject traditional treatments when they are really sick.

More on When Alternative Medicine Was Wrong