Tag: myths

Recommendations for Reporting About Vaccines

Historically, the media has played a huge role in pushing vaccine misinformation and scaring parents away from vaccinating and protecting their kids.

“The media created the MMR hoax, and they maintained it diligently for 10 years.”

Dr. Ben Goldacre Bad Science

Even before Andy Wakefield and his MMR hoax, the media helped fuel pertussis outbreaks by pushing the flawed research of John Wilson, which led to lawsuits against DPT vaccines and a big drop in vaccination rates.

None of it was true and the lawsuits failed, but the consequence was still that many unvaccinated kids died.

Bob Sears appeared on Fox & Friends in 2010 for the segment "Vaccines: A Bad Combination?"
Bob Sears appearing on Fox & Friends in 2010 for the segment “Vaccines: A Bad Combination?” is a great example of false balance.

Many others in the media have done a great job in promoting myths and fake controversies about vaccines and have used false balance in their interviews and articles to scare parents.

Fortunately, things have gotten better over the years.

Important Points for Reporting About Vaccines

Still, despite what some folks might think, health journalists aren’t going to get in trouble for reporting about vaccines.

They are going to hear about it if they do a bad job though.

“…it is important to recognise that the balance of media reporting does not necessarily reflect the balance of the argument among the involved professionals – by this is meant that equal weighting might be given by the media (and thus the lay community) to those for and against the vaccine although opponents of vaccination might be a very small number, as for example happened with both pertussis and MMR.”

David Baxter on Opposition to Vaccination and Immunisation the UK Experience – from Smallpox to MMR

Remember, the way that health journalists cover vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases can influence the behavior of people, either helping them understand that vaccines are safe and necessary, putting them on-the-fence about vaccines, or scarring them away from getting vaccinated and protected.

So be careful when reporting about vaccines, as it gives you the opportunity to correct many of myths that scare people, while educating folks about the topic you are covering.

You should also:

Are you ready to cover your next story about vaccines or the next measles outbreak?

What to Know About Reporting on Vaccines

The way that health journalists cover vaccines and vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks can influence the behavior of people, either helping them understand that vaccines are safe and necessary, putting them on-the-fence about vaccines, or scarring them away from getting vaccinated and protected.

More on Reporting about Vaccines

Answers To Frequently Asked Questions About Immunizations

Have questions about your child’s immunizations?

We probably have the answers.

Answers To Frequently Asked Questions About Immunizations

Not surprisingly, many parents have the same questions about immunizations and they want answers to reassure themselves that they are doing the right thing for their kids by getting them vaccinated and protected.

Still have questions?

Rotavirus vaccines are associated with a very small risk of intussusception, but that is not a good reason to miss the benefits of this vaccine.
Like most pediatricians, my kids are vaccinated and protected. Photo by Vincent Iannelli, MD

With so much misinformation out there scaring folks about vaccines, that’s not surprising.

Just keep in mind that every anti-vaccine talking point and myth they push has an easy answer, even as folks continue to move the goalposts in search of new arguments against vaccines.

Yesterday it was mercury. Today it’s aluminum. Tomorrow it will be something else, while they continue to use vaccine scare videos to make you think that vaccines aren’t safe.

Parents who do their research understand that the real threat to their kids isn’t vaccines, it is the anti-vaccine experts that continue to push propaganda about vaccines.

What to Know About Answers To Frequently Asked Questions About Immunizations

The most basic answers to your questions about vaccines are that while vaccines aren’t perfect, they are safe and necessary and they do work well to protect us from vaccine-preventable disease.

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What Causes Non-Stop Crying After DTaP Vaccines?

Most children cry after getting a shot.

Fortunately, they can usually be comforted quickly.

Historically, there has been one situation where kids might cry for longer periods of times.

Non-Stop Crying After DTaP Vaccines

The DTP vaccine was known to cause non-stop crying, for 3 hours or more in up to about 1 child out of 1,000.

“Persistent crying following DTaP (as well as other vaccines) has been observed far less frequently than it was following the use of DTP. When it occurred after DTP, it was considered to be an absolute contraindication to further doses of pertussis-containing vaccine. When it occurs following DTaP, it is considered a “precaution” (or warning). If you believe the benefit of the pertussis vaccine exceeds the risk of more crying (which, although unnerving, is otherwise benign), you can administer DTaP.”

Immunization Action Coalition on Ask the Experts about DTP

Although uncommon, it is certainly scary to have a child cry for 3 hours or more after a vaccine.

I guess that’s one good reason we don’t use the DTP vaccine anymore. On the other hand, although the newer DTaP has fewer side effects, it doesn’t work as well as the older DTP vaccine at protecting kids against pertussis.

What Causes Non-Stop Crying After DTaP Vaccines?

Some people have very wrong ideas about what caused this non-stop crying after the DTP vaccine, which is reflected in the nick-names they gave it, such as the “DTP scream,” “cry-encephalitis,” or the “encephalitic cry.”

If your child has had non-stop crying after their DTP vaccine, or DTaP vaccine for that matter, you can be reassured that they didn’t have encephalitis!

The forums of Mothering.com are notorious for pushing anti-vax misinformation, including the idea of an "encephalitic cry."
The forums of Mothering.com are notorious for pushing anti-vax misinformation, including the idea of an “encephalitic cry” after DTP vaccines.

Again, although it is scary to have your child crying non-stop for 3 hours or more, this crying is benign and has no long term effects.

So what is causing it?

It is thought to be a painful local reaction.

Remember that the next time you see a vaccine scare video about the “DTaP scream” or talk about encephalitis

What to Know About DTaP Crying

Crying non-stop for 3 hours or more after a vaccine can be scary. Fortunately, DTaP crying is not caused by encephalitis or any other terrible thing you might read about. It is a painful local reaction.

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Vaccine Ingredients

From antigens and adjuvants to preservatives, learn about common ingredients in vaccines and why they are safe.

What’s in Vaccines?

It is no secret what’s in our vaccines.

A list of ingredients is included on the vaccine’s package insert and can be found on a number of articles on the Internet.

In addition to other ingredients, a vaccine's package insert includes the viral or bacterial antigens that are in the vaccine.
In addition to other ingredients, a vaccine’s package insert includes the viral or bacterial antigens that are in the vaccine.

In addition to the active ingredients, the viral or bacterial antigens in the vaccine that you generate antibodies against, vaccines are made with a number of excipients, inactive substances or manufacturing by-products that are used to produce the vaccine:

  • preservatives – prevent bacterial and fungal contamination in multi-dose vials – thimerosal, 2-phenoxyethanol, phenol
  • adjuvants – help stimulate a stronger immune response so fewer antigens can be used – aluminum salts
  • stabilizers – maintain the potency of the vaccine and include sugars, amino acids, and proteins – lactose, MSG, gelatin
  • cell culture materials – what the vaccine antigens grow in – chicken egg proteins, yeast proteins, fetal bovine serum proteins
  • inactivating materials – kills viruses, inactivates toxins – formaldehyde
  • antibiotics – prevents bacterial contamination of the vaccine – neomycin, polymyxin B
  • suspending fluid – saline, etc.

Many of these excipients are removed from the final vaccine product and might only remain in residual amounts.

What’s Not in Vaccines?

Despite what myths you might have heard or read, many things are not in vaccines:

  • a vaginal spermacide
  • antifreeze
  • thimerosal – almost all vaccines, including over 130,000,000 flu vaccines this year, are thimerosal free!
  • aborted fetal tissue – there is no aborted fetal tissue or fetal parts in any vaccine, although some vaccines are made with fetal embryo fibroblast cells from cell lines that are derived (they can replicate infinitely) from two electively terminated pregnancies in the 1960s
  • Adjuvant 65 – an adjuvant that contained peanut oil that was tested with flu vaccines in the 1960s and continues to be blamed for causing peanut allergies, even though it has never been used in a vaccine

Vaccines are safe. Vaccine ingredients are safe.

What to Know About Vaccine Ingredients

Vaccines contain a number of ingredients that help them work stimulate a good immune response against particular viral and bacterial antigens to protect us against vaccine-preventable diseases.

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