Tag: myths

Who is Making Up the Novel Coronavirus Conspiracy Theories?

Guess who is behind most of the conspiracy theories that you might be seeing and hearing about the novel cornonavirus?

Have you figured it out? If Del Bigtree can make you distrust experts about the coronavirus, then you probably won't trust them about vaccines either...
Have you figured it out? If Del Bigtree can make you distrust experts about the coronavirus, then you probably won’t trust them about vaccines either…

Yep, the usual suspects.

Who is Making Up the Novel Coronavirus Conspiracy Theories?

Why are they making up conspiracy theories about the novel coronavirus?

“This isn’t a ‘conspiracy theory,’ it is a scientific, medical theory. Its foundation is based on sound science, logic, and research, and the mainstream media needs to be asked whether it is going to pursue this link to SARS instead of trying to censor anyone who is trying to pursue truth via scientific fact.”

Del Bigtree

Maybe it’s because that’s what they do

“Antivaccine activists are incredibly consistent in two things. First, they are conspiracy theorists par excellence. This first observation should not be surprising given that antivaccine views are strongly grounded in conspiracy theories, particularly what I like to call the central conspiracy theory of the antivaccine movement, namely that “they” (the CDC, big pharma, doctors, etc.) “know” that vaccines cause autism and all the adverse health effects falsely attributed to them by antivaxxers but are covering up the studies and data showing that.”

Orac on The latest antivaccine conspiracy theory: The 2019-nCoV Wuhan outbreak is due to a failed coronavirus vaccine

So what’s the “medical theory” that Del Bigtree is pursuing?

Note that Del Bigtree's press release said that they used "science and facts," so his theory must be true!
Note that Del Bigtree’s press release said that they used “science and facts,” so his theory must be true!

Wait, is Dr. James Lyons-Weiler really a virologist?

Bobby Kennedy has his own novel cornovirus conspiracy theory.
Bobby Kennedy has his own novel cornovirus conspiracy theory.

And how does his theory fit in with novel coronavirus theory that Bobby Kennedy has been pushing?

The "research paper" that stoked fears of spiked proteins and similarity to HIV was quickly withdrawn by its authors...
The “research paper” that stoked fears of spiked proteins and similarity to HIV was quickly withdrawn by its authors…

Or the idea that 2019-nCoV was genetically engineered to insert pieces of HIV into it and that 2019-nCoV is part of a plot to develop a bioweapon, having been stolen from a lab in Canada?

Do these folks think that the novel coronavirus escaped from a computer simulation?!?
Do these folks think that the novel coronavirus escaped from a computer simulation?!?

Of course, there is nothing to any of these conspiracy theories about the coronavirus.

Why should people have to waste time debunking these conspiracy theories?
Why should people have to waste time debunking these conspiracy theories?

Just like there was nothing to all of the conspiracy theories about the measles epidemic in Samoa.

What happened to Del Bigtree's theory of new strains of mutating measles?
What happened to Del Bigtree‘s theory of new strains of mutating measles?

Remember them?

Show me the evidence for all of these vaccine-strain measles outbreaks?
Show me the evidence for all of these vaccine-strain measles outbreaks?

Or all of the conspiracy theories about vaccine-strain measles causing outbreaks.

Don’t be fooled.

“At the core of conspiracy theories is a mistrust in authorities, the government, the media, professional associations, institutions, industry, and academia.”

Katrin Weigmann on The Genesis of a Conspiracy Theory: Why Do People Believe in Scientific Conspiracy Theories and How Do They Spread?

These types of conspiracy theories can do real harm, especially when they lead people away from getting necessary medical care.

“An important aspect of conspiracy theory is to come up with a seemingly coherent explanation that is consistent with one’s worldviews.”

Katrin Weigmann on The Genesis of a Conspiracy Theory: Why Do People Believe in Scientific Conspiracy Theories and How Do They Spread?

Ask even more questions if you believe many of these types of conspiracy theories.

More on Novel Coronavirus Conspiracy Theories

The Myth That Measles Never Left

Measles cases are on the rise. Where? Pretty much everywhere. But some folks are still pushing the myth that measles never left.

The highest number of measles cases in over 25 years? Don't call it a comeback?
Don’t call it a comeback? Cases in the US average 283 cases per year over the past 12 years (if you don’t skip 2019…)

It is easy to see that measles myth, like most AV myths, isn’t true.

The Myth That Measles Never Left

In the pre-vaccine era, everyone would get measles.

That translates into about 500,000 reported cases each year. Technically, it was likely closer to about 4 million cases in the United States each year, but either way, we know that lots of people got measles.

Then we got a measles vaccine and not surprisingly, cases of measles dropped. Except for a small uptick from 1989 to 1991, we were on our way to eliminating measles.

And we did, in 2000, when the endemic spread of measles was eliminated in the United States. From then on, all measles cases were imported.

In 2004, we had an historic low of just 37 measles cases in the United States!

Will we ever have fewer than 37 cases in a year?
Will we ever have fewer than 37 cases in a year?

And from 2000 to 2012, we averaged just 87 measles cases each year, which is far below the US average of 283 cases we are now seeing.

No, measles never completely left. It was not eradicated.

But it is certainly making a comeback and soaring to levels that we haven’t seen since 1992!

Just think about it… We had 37 cases of measles in 2004 and this year, we often had 37 cases in a single week!

Get vaccinated and protected so that you don’t get caught up in the next outbreak.

More on Measles Cases

The CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy is Officially Dead

You remember the CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy, right?

The birth of a new anti-vaccine conspiracy theory!
The birth of a new anti-vaccine conspiracy theory!

After all, they just made it up last week..

Anyway, it was notable for not only being one of the sillier conspiracy theories anti-vaccine folks have come up with lately, but for spawning a secondary conspiracy theory that was even worse.

Apparently you can make up your own anti-vaccine conspiracy theories.
You can’t make this stuff up – apparently you can…

Yes, they thought that there “was so much hysteria around measles” because the vaccines were expiring.

The CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy is Officially Dead

Of course, MMR vaccine isn’t expiring…

This box of MMR was received in March 2019 and doesn’t expire until October 2020.

And those expiring contracts?

They were renewed! Just like they are every year.

So did everyone stop talking about measles and getting folks vaccinated?

Are all of the measles outbreaks over? Do they still have medical martial law in New York?

Did you buy into this conspiracy theory? Although it was obviously ridiculous, it only took a few minutes of real research to find proof of why it was so ridiculous.

More on the CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy


The CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy

Have you ever wondered where anti-vaccine conspiracy theories come from?

I’ve always figured they just make this stuff up…

The birth of a new anti-vaccine conspiracy theory!
The birth of a new anti-vaccine conspiracy theory!

And it is pretty clear that they do!

The CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy

Just consider their latest conspiracy, which they think explains “the measles outbreak and the scare tactics.”

Apparently you can make up your own anti-vaccine conspiracy theories.
You can’t make this stuff up – apparently you can…

It’s funny how the theory has already morphed into something even more unintelligible. Notice how it has already changed from their contract expiring to the vaccines themselves expiring.

Either way, how does that explain that a lot more folks are getting measles this year?!?

There were only 37 cases of measles in the United States in 2004…

More importantly, when the CDC vaccine contracts expired in 2004, as they do each and every year, why didn’t we see big jumps in measles cases? Didn’t they need to inflate the case counts to help with the re-negotiations?

What about all of the other years?

Did you buy into this conspiracy theory? Although it was obviously ridiculous, it only took a few minutes of real research to find proof of why it was so ridiculous.

More on the CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy