Tag: myths

The Myth That Measles Never Left

Measles cases are on the rise. Where? Pretty much everywhere. But some folks are still pushing the myth that measles never left.

The highest number of measles cases in over 25 years? Don't call it a comeback?
Don’t call it a comeback? Cases in the US average 283 cases per year over the past 12 years (if you don’t skip 2019…)

It is easy to see that measles myth, like most AV myths, isn’t true.

The Myth That Measles Never Left

In the pre-vaccine era, everyone would get measles.

That translates into about 500,000 reported cases each year. Technically, it was likely closer to about 4 million cases in the United States each year, but either way, we know that lots of people got measles.

Then we got a measles vaccine and not surprisingly, cases of measles dropped. Except for a small uptick from 1989 to 1991, we were on our way to eliminating measles.

And we did, in 2000, when the endemic spread of measles was eliminated in the United States. From then on, all measles cases were imported.

In 2004, we had an historic low of just 37 measles cases in the United States!

Will we ever have fewer than 37 cases in a year?
Will we ever have fewer than 37 cases in a year?

And from 2000 to 2012, we averaged just 87 measles cases each year, which is far below the US average of 283 cases we are now seeing.

No, measles never completely left. It was not eradicated.

But it is certainly making a comeback and soaring to levels that we haven’t seen since 1992!

Just think about it… We had 37 cases of measles in 2004 and this year, we often had 37 cases in a single week!

Get vaccinated and protected so that you don’t get caught up in the next outbreak.

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The CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy is Officially Dead

You remember the CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy, right?

The birth of a new anti-vaccine conspiracy theory!
The birth of a new anti-vaccine conspiracy theory!

After all, they just made it up last week..

Anyway, it was notable for not only being one of the sillier conspiracy theories anti-vaccine folks have come up with lately, but for spawning a secondary conspiracy theory that was even worse.

Apparently you can make up your own anti-vaccine conspiracy theories.
You can’t make this stuff up – apparently you can…

Yes, they thought that there “was so much hysteria around measles” because the vaccines were expiring.

The CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy is Officially Dead

Of course, MMR vaccine isn’t expiring…

This box of MMR was received in March 2019 and doesn’t expire until October 2020.

And those expiring contracts?

They were renewed! Just like they are every year.

So did everyone stop talking about measles and getting folks vaccinated?

Are all of the measles outbreaks over? Do they still have medical martial law in New York?

Did you buy into this conspiracy theory? Although it was obviously ridiculous, it only took a few minutes of real research to find proof of why it was so ridiculous.

More on the CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy


The CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy

Have you ever wondered where anti-vaccine conspiracy theories come from?

I’ve always figured they just make this stuff up…

The birth of a new anti-vaccine conspiracy theory!
The birth of a new anti-vaccine conspiracy theory!

And it is pretty clear that they do!

The CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy

Just consider their latest conspiracy, which they think explains “the measles outbreak and the scare tactics.”

Apparently you can make up your own anti-vaccine conspiracy theories.
You can’t make this stuff up – apparently you can…

It’s funny how the theory has already morphed into something even more unintelligible. Notice how it has already changed from their contract expiring to the vaccines themselves expiring.

Either way, how does that explain that a lot more folks are getting measles this year?!?

There were only 37 cases of measles in the United States in 2004…

More importantly, when the CDC vaccine contracts expired in 2004, as they do each and every year, why didn’t we see big jumps in measles cases? Didn’t they need to inflate the case counts to help with the re-negotiations?

What about all of the other years?

Did you buy into this conspiracy theory? Although it was obviously ridiculous, it only took a few minutes of real research to find proof of why it was so ridiculous.

More on the CDC Vaccine Price List Conspiracy


Ask 8 Questions Before You Skip a Vaccine

As anti-vaccine folks get more attention because of the rise in outbreaks of vaccine-preventable disease, in addition to more folks getting vaccinated, we are seeing some of the leaders of the anti-vaccine movement get more vocal.

Are measles outbreaks a sign that the anti-vaccine movement is “winning?”

Meetings, dinners, rallies…

They are doing everything they can to get their misinformation and propaganda out so that you don’t vaccinate and protect your kids.

Ask 8 Questions Before You Skip a Vaccine

If you see any of these folks, ask them a few questions…

  1. If Andrew Wakefield was right, and the MMR vaccine is associated with autism, then why are you worried about thimerosal? The MMR vaccine never contained thimerosal…
  2. If Robert F. Kennedy, Jr is right, and it is all about thimerosal, then why are you worried about the MMR vaccine? The MMR vaccine never contained thimerosal…
  3. If you are worried about thimerosal and aluminum, then why are you worried about the MMR vaccine? Not only has it never contained thimerosal, as a live vaccine, but it has also never contained aluminum.
  4. If vaccines are associated with autism, then why don’t the counties with the highest immunization rates have the highest rates of autism?
  5. If better hygiene and sanitation got rid of vaccine-preventable diseases, then why didn’t it do it for all diseases at the same time? And why hasn’t it gotten rid of RSV, Ebola, Zika, HIV, Norovirus, and all of the diseases that we don’t have vaccines for?
  6. If measles is so mild, then during the measles epidemics from 1989 to 1991 in the United States, why were 11,000 people hospitalized and why did 123 people die?
  7. If you are concerned about vaccines that have a distant association with abortion, then why don’t you vaccinate your kids with all of the vaccines that don’t use WI-38 and MRC-5 cells lines?
  8. If your arguments are so solid, then why do you need to keep moving the goalposts (it’s autoimmune diseases they are worried about now, not autism) and why are they so easy to refute (vaccines aren’t associated with autoimmune diseases either)?

The answers will be predictable.

They will revolve around three basic core beliefs of the anti-vaccine movement.

  • The belief that vaccines are toxic, full of poison, and always cause damage and injuries.
  • The belief that vaccine-preventable diseases are mild and you are better off getting natural immunity.
  • The belief that vaccines don’t even work.

Is that what you believe?

Will you let those kinds of beliefs scare you away from vaccinating and protecting your kids?

Are you going to put our kids at risk because you believe those things?

Are you really making an informed choice to skip or delay a vaccine when all of the scary things that people are telling you about vaccines aren’t even true?

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