Tag: travel

Measles Outbreaks in New Zealand

Just like other areas of the world, New Zealand has a problem with measles outbreaks. It shouldn’t be surprising then that they also have a problem with folks pushing anti-vax misinformation.

Where are the areas in New Zealand with 97% MMR vaccination rates?
Where are the areas in New Zealand with 97% MMR vaccination rates? Just askin…

Are they really seeing the most measles cases in the areas with the highest vaccination rates?

Measles Outbreaks in New Zealand

One thing is sure, there are a lot of measles cases in New Zealand.

“From 1 January 2019 to 10 October 2019 there have been 1742 confirmed cases of measles notified across New Zealand. 1416 of these confirmed cases are in the Auckland region.”

2019 NZ measles outbreak information

Do we know which parts of New Zealand have the most measles outbreaks?

We do!

Where are the cases in the measles outbreaks in New Zealand?
The case count is now up to 1742…

Of course, this doesn’t really tell you anything about why some districts have more cases than others…

Is it because they have more unvaccinated people or simply because they have a lot more people?

Many of the measles cases in New Zealand are in infants too young to be vaccinated and in teens and young adults.
Many of the measles cases in New Zealand are in infants too young to be vaccinated and in teens and young adults.

Wherever they live, we know that like measles outbreaks in every other part of the world, few of the folks with measles in New Zealand are known to be fully vaccinated.

And while New Zealand had eliminated home grown-cases of measles just a few years ago, it wasn’t with vaccination rates of 97%.

“For immunisation from measles, rubella and mumps two doses of the vaccine called MMR are needed. Dr McElnay said among New Zealand’s children and infants, 95 percent had had the first dose and 90 percent the full vaccine.”

NZ eliminates NZ-origin measles

Unfortunately, while they were working to get younger kids vaccinated and protected, many older kids and adults are still not vaccinated.

“However, we must remain vigilant and improve our vaccination rates because these diseases can easily spread among unimmunised people from imported cases. In New Zealand, people aged 12 to 32 years have lower vaccination rates than young children so are less likely to be protected against these diseases.”

Measles and rubella officially eliminated in New Zealand

Only about 80% of teens and young adults are fully vaccinated against measles in New Zealand!

Combined with high numbers of folks who were never vaccinated and folks who travel to other parts of the world where measles is still endemic and you have a recipe for disaster.

“While there have been no measles deaths in this outbreak, there have been five pregnant women hospitalised and two fetal losses associated with these events.”

Report investigates high hospitalisation rates for measles in Auckland region

In addition to the two unborn babies who died, there are also reports of at least three hospitalisations for encephalitis.

Two doses of the MMR vaccine is your best protection against measles.

A disaster that could easily be prevented with two doses of a vaccine that is safe, with few risks, and obviously necessary.

More on Measles in New Zealand

Mapping the 2019 Measles Outbreaks

Cases of measles continue to rise, as we pass 1,000 cases in the United States.

2019 Measles Outbreaks

With a record high number of cases, there are measles cases and outbreaks in 31 states, including:

Alaska1Massachusetts2
Arizona1Michigan44
California61Mississippi1
Colorado1Missouri2
Connecticut3Nevada1
Florida2New Hampshire1
Georgia3New Jersey13
Hawaii2New York804
Idaho2Ohio1
Illinois7Oklahoma4
Indiana1Oregon11
Iowa2Pennsylvania6
Kentucky2Tennessee3
Maine1Texas20
Maryland4Virginia1
Washington85

What’s the first thing you notice about this measles outbreaks?

Where Are the Measles Outbreaks

They aren’t spread out evenly through the United States.

A simple tilegram of the United States.
A simple tilegram of the United States.

In fact, the largest outbreaks are clustered in just a few states, including California, Michigan, New York (Rockland County and Brooklyn), and Washington (Pacific Northwest Outbreak and the Puget Sound Outbreak).

Mapping the 2019 Measles Outbreaks

What does that look like when you map it?

It looks a little strange…

A tilegram mapping the 2019 measles outbreaks in the United States.

And that’s because, amazingly, about 70% of cases this year are in just one state – New York!

But that doesn’t mean that you don’t have to be concerned if you don’t live in New York. After all, measles is on the rise all over the world and it is still just a plane ride away. And there are plenty of other communities with low immunization rates where folks are at risk for outbreaks.

Also consider that even without the big outbreaks, this would still rank as a big year for measles.

Bottom line?

Get vaccinated and protected and stop the outbreaks. The MMR vaccine is safe, effective, with few risks. And it is obviously necessary.

More on Mapping the 2019 Measles Outbreaks

When Do You Get the Measles Vaccine?

With the rise in measles cases this year, folks are asking when they routinely get the measles vaccine to help make sure they are vaccinated and protected.

Do you know when you routinely get your measles vaccine?
Adults who aren’t high risk might be able to get away with simply having one dose of MMR or a measles containing vaccine since 1967.

Unfortunately, there isn’t an easy answer.

When Do You Get the Measles Vaccine?

Well, there kind of is.

Today, we routinely give:

  • the first dose of the measles vaccine (MMR) when toddlers are 12 to 15 months old, and
  • the second dose of MMR when they are 4 to 6 years old

However, if you are at high risk to get measles, especially if you are planning to travel out of the country or to specific areas with active outbreaks, you should get those doses early.

Early Doses of MMR

How early?

As early as age six months.

In fact, high-risk infants 6 through 11 months of age should receive one early dose of MMR vaccine, a dose that will have to be repeated when they are 12 months old. This early dose is mostly about international travel though and not travel within the United States, unless there is a specific recommendation in a local area.

“For outbreaks with sustained, community-wide transmission affecting infants <12 months of age and with ongoing risk of exposures to infants, health departments may consider vaccination of infants aged 6-11 months in these affected areas (including visitors) with 1 dose of MMR vaccine. This recommendation should be made following careful assessment of the benefit of early protection against measles during a period of increased transmission and exposure, and risk of decreased immune response following subsequent MMR doses in infants vaccinated at <12 months of age compared with infants vaccinated at ≥12 months of age.”

Manual for the Surveillance of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

And children 1 to 3 years of age who are high-risk should receive two doses of MMR vaccine (instead of waiting to get the second dose when they are 4-6 years old), separated by at least 28 days.

This second dose doesn’t have to be repeated though.

When Did We Use to Give the Measles Vaccine?

Still, more than a review of the current immunization schedule, most folks want to know when we used to get vaccinated against measles. That’s what might help you figure out if you are vaccinated and protected.

Hopefully, you can just check your shot records too.

It might also help to know that we began:

  • giving the first measles vaccine in 1963. This doesn’t count as a dose of measles vaccine though, as it didn’t provide long-lasting protection.
  • giving the first improved, live measles vaccine in 1967.
  • using the combined MMR in 1971.
  • offering a second dose of MMR to kids in 1990.

So, how many doses have you had?

What to Know About Getting an MMR Vaccine

If you haven’t had two doses and are at high risk to get measles, get caught up and protected. Keep in mind that you don’t need to check your titers first and you won’t need a third dose of MMR. Titers might be a good idea if you were born before 1957 and aren’t sure if you had a natural case of measles.

“The best way to protect yourself and your loved ones from measles is by getting vaccinated. You should plan to be fully vaccinated at least 2 weeks before you depart. If your trip is less than 2 weeks away and you’re not protected against measles, you should still get a dose of MMR vaccine.”

Before international travel: Make sure you’re protected against measles

Lastly, if possible, try to get your second dose of MMR at least two weeks before your trip.

More on When We Give the Measles Vaccine

Who’s Getting Measles?

We will soon pass the last record high number of measles cases – 963 cases – set in 1994.

We will soon pass the last record high number of measles cases - 963 cases - set in 1994.

With 839 cases as of mid-April, it’s hard to believe that only 55 cases were reported during all of 2012!

Who’s Getting Measles?

So what do we know about the people who are getting measles?

More importantly, the thing that most parents want to know – are their families at risk?

We know that of the 839 cases right now:

  • 442 are in Brooklyn among the Orthodox Jewish community, where only 4% of cases have been fully vaccinated
  • 125 are in Rockland County, New York, among the Orthodox Jewish community, where only 3% of cases have been fully vaccinated
  • 78 were in the Pacific Northwest Outbreak (Washington and Oregon), where none were fully immunized – (ended)
  • 43 are in Michigan, mostly among Oakland County’s Orthodox Jewish community, triggered by a man who had recently traveled from New York

So just over 80% of cases are associated with four outbreaks, one of which has been declared over, and mostly among children and adults who were intentionally not vaccinated.

The rest of the 200 cases?

Among 45 cases in California, are 30 cases in these four outbreaks.
Among 45 cases in California, are 30 cases in these four outbreaks.

They are spread out in smaller outbreaks in other states, including Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, and Texas.

Does that mean that you don’t have to worry about measles?

It means that you don’t have to panic about measles.

Get your kids vaccinated and protected, which might include an early dose of MMR, learn the signs and symptoms of measles, and keep up on news of outbreaks in your area.

That should help decrease the risk that they get caught up in an outbreak.

And double check your own vaccine records! Have you had an MMR vaccine? Have you had two doses?

Unfortunately, not everyone can get vaccinated and protected, which is causing some folks to panic. This includes those who are too young to be vaccinated, or fully vaccinated, and those with immune system problems.

That’s not fair.

Let’s stop the outbreaks so we don’t get to the point that measles truly is everywhere and even more high-risk people are put at risk.

More on Who’s Getting Measles