Tag: questions about vaccines

Immunization Quiz

Think that you have done enough research about vaccines and are ready to take our immunization quiz?

Let’s see how you do…

Results

Great job!

Good try, but you might want to do a little more research about vaccines.

#1 You might need a tetanus shot if…

Any contaminated puncture wounds, whether from a rusty nail, bite, or scratch, may require a tetanus shot and TIG if your immunizations aren’t current.

#2 DTaP stands for…

DTaP stands for Diphtheria, Tetanus and acellular Pertussis.

#3 If you miss one or more of your child’s sets of shots, you will usually need to…

In general, you do not need to restart the entire series of a vaccine if you miss one or more doses. You should schedule a visit as soon as possible to get caught up though.

#4 If your child has a possible side effect after getting his vaccines, you can report it to…

You or your Pediatrician can report possible vaccine side effects to VAERS, the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System.

#5 Prevnar is a vaccine that protects against infections with the Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria, which commonly causes…

The Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria can commonly cause meningitis, blood infections, pneumonia and ear infections.

#6 In general, vaccines are…

Vaccines are neither 100% safe nor 100% effective, but they do offer the ‘highest degree of protection with the lowest rate of untoward effects’ and the benefits of getting vaccinated is thought by most professionals to outweigh the risks.

#7 Heather Whitestone, who was crowned Miss America in 1994, was deaf because of…

Newspapers reported that Heather Whitestone, who won the Miss America pageant in 1994, had a reaction to the DPT shot. In reality, her deafness was a result of a Hib infection.

#8 If you want to protect your healthy 6 year old against the flu, you can get him a flu vaccine in a…

Flumist, a nasal spray flu vaccine, can be given to healthy children who are at least 2 years old, so this child could either get a regular flu shot or the nasal spray.

#9 Which of the following vaccines usually aren’t given until your child’s first birthday?

The first MMR vaccine usually isn’t given until a child is 12-15 months of age, although it can be given as early as 6 months if they will be traveling to a high risk area or during an outbreak, with the dose repeated at 12 months. The first DTaP is given at 2 months and the influenza vaccine (flu shot) can be given to infants over age 6 months. The Td or tetanus vaccine is not given until a child is at least 7 years old.

#10 At what age can children begin getting yearly flu shots?

#11 You can get a flu vaccine if you are…

In general, you can get a flu shot if you are breastfeeding or pregnant. People with severe egg allergies should talk to their doctor before getting a flu shot, but they can still usually be vaccinated. There is no association between milk allergies and the flu shot.

#12 MMR stands for…

MMR is a combination of the Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccines.

#13 Before going to college, students, especially those that will be living in a dorm should consider getting…

College students, particularly those who live in dormitories, have a slightly increased risk of getting meningococcal disease and should get a meningococcal vaccine (Menactra or Menveo). A menB vaccine is also now available.

#14 There are vaccines to prevent your child from getting infected with the…

There is currently no hepatitis C vaccine, but children and adults can get vaccinated with both the hepatitis A and hepatitis B vaccines.

#15 In the United States, the oral polio vaccine is…

The oral polio or Sabin vaccine is no longer given to children in the United States because in a few people (about one in 2.4 million), it can cause polio. The oral polio vaccine is actually better at keeping the disease from spreading to other people though and is still used in many parts of the world.

#16 There are vaccines that can protect people against…

There are vaccines to protect against smallpox and anthrax, however there are no vaccines against SARS or the West Nile virus. The vaccine against Lyme Disease is no longer available. We do have a Rotavirus vaccine.

#17 You have lost your 5 year olds shot records and he is about to start school. You may have to…

Since Hib and Prevnar are usually only given to children under age 5, you would not have to repeat all of his shots. You will have to repeat some of them though (DTaP (4doses), IPV (3doses), hepatitis A (2 doses), hepatitis B (3 doses), MMR (2 doses), Chickenpox (2 doses)) if you do not test his immunity or titer testing does not prove that he is immune.

#18 If a women is pregnant, which shots should her kids not receive?

A pregnant household member, including the child’s mother, is not a contraindication to administration of any vaccine.

#19 Waning immunity is an issue for which of the following vaccines?

Vaccine-induced immunity to pertussis is thought to last for just a few years following the last dose. Measles and chickenpox immunity is long lasting.

#20 Your child should not get a vaccine if…

In general, vaccines do not need to be delayed for mild illnesses, with or without fever, such as a cold or if your child is taking antibiotics. Having had a severe allergic reaction to a vaccine is usually a contraindication or reason not to get another one.

finish

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Jenna Jameson Helps Explain the Modern Anti-Vax Movement

Jenna Jameson is the latest “celebrity” to be talking about vaccines.

Is Jenna Jameson anti-vaccine?

And it helps explain what is going on in the modern anti-vaccine movement.

Jenna Jameson Helps Explain the Modern Anti-Vax Movement

So why is Jenna Jameson talking about vaccines?

Is it because she is vegan?

Many vegans vaccinate.

Maybe, but many vegans vaccinate themselves and their kids…

Is she just against vaccine mandates?

One of the best reasons to question vaccines is because the government is mandating them?

Sure, it is possible she just has a problem with the government telling her what to do.

Not encephalitis, but a motor vehicle accident can lead to a brain injury or even chronic traumatic encephalopathy though.
Not encephalitis, but a motor vehicle accident can lead to a brain injury or even chronic traumatic encephalopathy though.

But that became a less likely reason as she kept tweeting…

Jenna Jameson thinks that vaccines cause peanut allergies.

That vaccines can cause peanut allergies is a common anti-vax talking point. They think that it has something to do with peanut oil adjuvants, even though these peanut oil adjuvants were never actually used in any routine vaccines.

It eventually came out though.

Jenna Jameson is questioning vaccines because she feels that her child nearly died after her vaccines – from a febrile seizure.

A febrile seizure after a vaccine has Jenna Jameson questioning vaccines.

And of course, it is bullying to try and explain that febrile seizures are not a life-threatening reaction.

So what’s the problem?

Jenna Jameson made a lot of misinformed statements about vaccines.
Jenna Jameson made a lot of misinformed statements about vaccines.

It’s not Jenna Jameson questioning vaccines or even whether or not she vaccinates her kids.

It’s her using her celebrity status to scare other parents away from vaccinating and protecting their kids.

Jenna Jameson is happy that she is scaring parents away from vaccinating and protecting their kids?
Jenna Jameson is happy that she is scaring parents away from vaccinating and protecting their kids?

Want to question something?

A febrile seizure is a vaccine injury now?
A febrile seizure is a vaccine injury now?

Question why parents listen to celebrities like Jenna Jameson when they try and make them think that vaccines are dangerous and cause things like peanut allergies, asthma, diabetes, and autism.

Or that febrile seizures are a dangerous reaction, a vaccine injury, that should keep them from continuing to get vaccinated.

“Fevers can be caused by common childhood illnesses like colds, the flu, an ear infection, or roseola. Vaccines can sometimes cause fevers, but febrile seizures are uncommon after vaccination.”

What is a febrile seizure?

Would you skip or delay your child’s vaccines, putting them at risk to get a life-threatening disease and putting others at risk, because Jenna Jameson, Rob Schneider, Kat Von D, Bill Maher, Kristin Cavallari, Lisa Bonet, or Cindy Crawford told you to?

More on Anti-Vaccine Celebrities

More Questions to Help You Become a Vaccine Skeptic

Are you skeptical about vaccinating your kids?

What is a vaccine skeptic?

That’s good!

You should be skeptical of just about everything. Many of us are.

It’s good to ask questions, do research, and doubt what people tell you…

The thing is, you can’t just be skeptical about stuff you don’t want to believe. You should be skeptical about everything. So don’t blindly buy into anti-vaccine arguments because they’re what you want to hear.

They’re likely the type of propaganda you need to be more skeptical of!

More Questions to Help You Become a Vaccine Skeptic

Wait, why would I want you to become a vaccine skeptic?

Well, if you do it right, you are going to realize that vaccines are safe, with few risks, and that they are very necessary.

Our first 8 questions hopefully got you started on seeing through anti-vaccine arguments, but here are some more you should think about:

  1. If the MMR vaccine is associated with autism, then how come the incidence of autism went up when they stopped using the MMR vaccine in Japan? Remember, Japan stopped using the combination MMR vaccine in 1993 because it had been linked to aseptic meningitis (the problem was with the mumps vaccine strain they were using, which was different than the one used in the United States, where there was no aseptic meningitis issue). And rates of autism have increased in Japan, just as they have in other countries. So much for the idea that the MMR vaccine is associated with autism, right?
  2. If vaccines don’t even work, then how come every time vaccination rates have dropped in an area, we have seen outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases?
  3. If vaccines are associated with SIDS, then why did the incidence of SIDS go down so much when we put infants to sleep on their backs, even as they were vaccinated and protected against more diseases?
  4. If vaccines don’t really work and we just change the names of the diseases, like smallpox became monkeypox, then where are all of the kids with monkeypox?!?
  5. If vaccines are associated with SIDS, then why didn’t the incidence of SIDS go down in Sweden when they stopped using the DPT vaccine between 1979 and 1996?
  6. Why didn’t the reanalysis of CDC’s MMR autism data, the whole thing behind the CDC Whistleblower and Brian Hooker’s paper (which ended up being retracted), find an association between the MMR vaccine and autism in everyone, not just the small subset of African American males?
  7. If the Brady Bunch measles episode was supposed to push the idea that measles was mild, then why did Marsha end up vaccinating her own kids?
  8. What else do you believe? Do you believe in chemtrails? Homeopathy? That you shouldn’t treat kids with cancer with chemotherapy?

Be more skeptical of the misinformation that anti-vaccine folks use to scare you away from vaccinating and protecting your kids.

More on Becoming a Vaccine Skeptic

Do Vaccines Prevent Disease or Infection?

What kind of question is that?

Do you avoid vaccinating your kids because you believe in the sanctity of human blood?!?

It sounds like something from one of those folks who say that vaccination is not immunization, doesn’t it?

“A remark in passing: it has become cliché to say that vaccines prevent only disease, not infection.”

Stanley A. Plotkin on Correlates of Vaccine-Induced Immunity

Oh, it’s one of those kinds of questions

“Although that may be often the case, it is not a general truth. If the presence of antibodies is sufficient to prevent colonization of mucosal surfaces, vaccines can produce “sterile” immunity. Vaccines against polio, measles, rubella, Hib, pneumococcus, meningococcus, and probably human papillomavirus are all capable of preventing infection as well as disease.”

Stanley A. Plotkin on Correlates of Vaccine-Induced Immunity

The bottom line, whether they are preventing disease or infection, vaccines work to keep you from getting sick.

But just so you know, since talking about vaccines preventing disease vs infection is a thing, many vaccines do both.

More on Vaccines that Prevent Disease and Infection