Tag: ingredients

Does the flu shot contain a vaginal spermicide?

Many of us are used to hear some far out claims from anti-vaccine folks?

And most of us understand that none of them are true.

There is no antifreeze in vaccines.

And while many vaccines may contain aluminum, formaldehyde, albumin, gelatin, antibiotics, polysorbate 80, and yeast proteins, these are not toxic or dangerous.

Why are those ingredients in a vaccine?

They might be used as an adjuvant, inactivating ingredient, preservative, stabilizer, or as a growth medium.

Does the flu shot contain a vaginal spermicide?

The latest scare story from anti-vaccine folks is that flu shots contain a vaginal spermicide.

Now why would a vaginal spermicide be needed in a vaccine?

To make a long story short - flu vaccines don't contain a vaginal spermicide.
To make a long story short – flu vaccines don’t contain a vaginal spermicide.

It wouldn’t.

Anti-vaccine folks who have exposed are spreading this misinformation have confused octoxynol-9, a vaginal spermicide, with octoxynol-10, an ingredient in vaccines.

Aren’t they the same thing?

While both are a type of Triton X-100 nonionic surfactant, as you likely suspect, they are different. And that’s where the confusion sets in.

“Nonionic surfactant mixtures varying in the number of repeating ethoxy (oxy-1,2-ethanediyl) groups. They are used as detergents, emulsifiers, wetting agents, defoaming agents, etc. Octoxynol-9, the compound with 9 repeating ethoxy groups, is a spermatocide.”

PubChem on Triton X-100

In contrast to octoxynol-9, the compound octoxynol-10 has 10 repeating ethoxy groups.

Octoxynol-10 in Flu Vaccines

Octoxynol-10, which is also known as octylphenol ethoxylate, is a surfactant that is used in some flu vaccines in a 1% concentration to help further inactivate and then “split” the inactivated influenza virus that will ultimately be used in the vaccines.

“The majority of marketed seasonal influenza vaccines are prepared using viruses that are chemically inactivated and treated with a surfactant. Treating with surfactants has important consequences: it produces ‘split viruses’ by solubilizing viral membranes, stabilizes free membrane proteins and ensures a low level of reactogenicity while retaining high vaccine potency.”

Lee et all on Quantitative determination of the surfactant-induced split ratio of influenza virus by fluorescence spectroscopy.

A “low level of reactogenicity” means less side effects. That’s good.

Octoxynol-10 also acts as a stabilizer.

Like many other non-active ingredients, it is mostly filtered out from the final vaccine product.

How much is left?

Only residual amounts.

In Fluzone, it is reported to be at a maximum amount of ≤250 mcg per dose.

Do you know the dose of octoxynol-9 that was used in vaginal spermicides? At least 50mg (one applicator full), inserted vaginally before sex. Keep in mind that since they don’t protect against STD’s, they are typically used in combination with other forms of birth control.

What to Know About Octoxynol-10 in Flu Vaccines

Octoxynol-10 is an important ingredient of flu vaccines and is mostly filtered out of the final vaccine.

More About Octoxynol-10 in Flu Vaccines

Which Vaccines Are Gluten Free?

Why does gluten sometimes come up in discussions about vaccines?

Is it because a vaccine to treat people with Celiac disease is being tested?

Probably not.

It is more likely that it is because some people worry that vaccines contain gluten.

Which Vaccines Are Gluten-Free?

So which vaccines are gluten-free?

All vaccines are gluten-free. Do they need to labeled 'gluten-free' to convince some vaccine hesitant folks?
All vaccines are gluten-free. Do they need to labeled ‘gluten-free’ to convince some vaccine hesitant folks?

Fortunately, they all are, so you don’t have to worry about skipping or delaying your child’s vaccines if they have Celiac disease, a gluten sensitivity, or if you are simply following a gluten-free diet.

Vaccines and Food Allergies

Non-active components of vaccines can rarely trigger allergic reactions, including antibiotics and latex.

What about non-active vaccine ingredients that might worry someone with food allergies?

There actually are some, including eggs, milk, gelatin, and yeast.

Talk to your pediatrician or a pediatric allergist if you are concerned about vaccine allergies. They can review the “Algorithm for treatment of patients with hypersensitivity reactions after vaccines,” which “provides a rational and organized approach for the evaluation and treatment of patients with suspected hypersensitivity.”

This is especially important if you think that your child is allergic to all vaccines, something that is almost unheard of, as vaccines have different components and are made in different ways.

You don’t have to worry about gluten though.

What To Know About Vaccines and Gluten

There is no gluten in vaccines and vaccines are actually in development to treat people with gluten sensitivity.

For More Information on Vaccine Allergies

 

How to Read a Package Insert for a Vaccine

The highlights of prescribing information of the package insert offers a nice summary of each section, with more details in the full prescribing information section that follows.
The Highlights of Prescribing Information of the package insert offers a nice summary of each section, with more details in the Full Prescribing Information section that follows.

Show me the package insert!

If you are going to ask for a package insert, you should know what’s in it and how it should be read.

Otherwise, it is easy to get misled by antivaccine propaganda, like when Mike Adams claimed he discovered “a vaccine document on the FDA’s own website that openly admits vaccines are linked to autism.”

He really just found the widely available vaccine package insert that said no such thing.

How to Read a Package Insert for a Vaccine

What goes into a package insert is dictated by the FDA, specifically the Code of Federal Regulations Title 21, and Section 314 of the NCVIA, after consultation with the Advisory Commission on Childhood Vaccines.

Much like the package inserts for other medicines, a vaccine package insert includes up to 17 major sections, including:

  1. Indications and Usage – what the vaccine is used for
  2. Dosage and Administration – the recommended dose of vaccine, when and where it should be given, and how to mix it
  3. Dosage Forms and Strengths – available dosage forms
  4. Contraindications – all situations when the vaccine should not be given
  5. Warning and Precautions – all adverse reactions and safety hazards that may occur after getting the vaccine and what you should do if they occur
  6. Adverse Reactions – this section includes clinical trials experience, postmarketing experience, and voluntary reports, and it is very important to understand that it is not always possible to establish a causal relationship to vaccination for these adverse effects. So just because something is listed here, whether it is SIDS, autism, drowning, or a car accident, doesn’t mean that it was actually caused by the vaccine.
  7. Drug Interactions – any reactions you might expect between the vaccine and other drugs
  8. Use in Specific Populations – can include recommendations for use in pregnancy, nursing mothers, pediatric use, and geriatric use
  9.  Drug abuse and dependence – usually blank
  10.  Overdosage – usually blank
  11. Description – general information about the vaccine, including how it was made and all vaccine ingredients.
  12. Clinical Pharmacology – how the vaccine works, including how long you might expect protection to last
  13. Nonclinical Toxicology – must include a section on carcinogenesis, mutagenesis, impairment of fertility, even if it is to say that the vaccine “has not been evaluated for the potential to cause carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, or impairment of male fertility.”
  14. Clinical Studies – a discussion of the clinical studies that help us understand how to use the drug safely and effectively
  15. References – when necessary, a list of references that are important to decisions about the use of the vaccine
  16. How Supplied/Storage and Handling
  17. Patient Counseling Information – information necessary for patients to use the drug safely and effectively

In addition to not having sections 9 and 10, some vaccines don’t have a section 13. It is not a conspiracy. Some older vaccines, like Varivax, do not have to have a section 13 per FDA labeling rules.

Myths About Package Inserts

Just as important as what’s listed in a vaccine package insert, is what the package insert doesn’t say.

Or what you might be led to believe it says.

“To ensure the safety of new vaccines, preclinical toxicology studies are conducted prior to the initiation of, and concurrently with, clinical studies. There are five different types of preclinical toxicology study in the evaluation of vaccine safety: single and/or repeat dose, reproductive and developmental, mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and safety pharmacology. If any adverse effects are observed in the course of these studies, they should be fully evaluated and a final safety decision made accordingly. ”

M.D. Green on the Preclinical Toxicology of Vaccines

When reading a package insert, don’t be misled into thinking that:

  • you should be worried if a package insert states that a vaccine has not been evaluated for carcinogenic (being known or suspected of being able to cause cancer) or mutagenic (being known or suspected of causing mutations in our DNA, which can lead to cancer) potential or impairment of male fertility. Vaccines don’t cause cancer or impair male fertility, or female fertility for that matter. And as you probably know, many vaccines actually prevent cancer. Formaldehyde is the only vaccine ingredient on the list of known carcinogens, but it is the long-term exposure to high amounts of formaldehyde, usually inhaled formaldehyde, that is carcinogenic, not the residual amounts you might get in a vaccine over short amounts of time.
  • any vaccine actually causes SIDS or autism
  • pediatricians are trying to keep parents from reading package inserts. Your pediatrician is probably just confused as to why you want it, as the VIS is designed for parents, not the package insert. But if even if your pediatrician doesn’t hand you a package insert for each and every vaccine your child is going to get, they are readily available from the FDA and many other websites.

Better yet, just don’t be misled by anti-vaccine misinformation.

“Based on previous experience, carcinogenicity studies are generally not needed for adjuvants or adjuvanted vaccines.”

WHO Guidelines on Nonclinical Evaluation of Vaccine Adjuvants and Adjuvanted Vaccines

Vaccines are thoroughly tested for both efficacy and safety before they are approved.

It is also important to understand that the WHO Guidelines on Nonclinical Evaluation of Vaccine Adjuvants and Adjuvanted Vaccines and the European Medicines Evaluation Agency both state that mutagenicity and carcincogenicity studies are typically not required for vaccines.

Why not?

It is because vaccines have a low risk of inducing tumors.

There are also very specific guidelines and rules for when a manufacturer needs to perform fertility studies.

So, as expected, there are no surprises in vaccine package inserts. You can be sure that everything that needs to be tested to show that a vaccine is safe has been done. If it has “not been evaluated,” it is simply because it was not necessary.

Get educated about vaccines and get your family vaccinated and protected against vaccine preventable diseases.

What to Know About Reading Vaccine Package Inserts

Learn how to read vaccine package inserts so that you aren’t misled by many of the myths about what they do and don’t say, including why they are likely missing information on the vaccine’s potential to cause carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, or impairment of fertility.

More on How to Read a Package Insert for a Vaccine:

Slogans of the Anti-Vaccine Movement

Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carrey went on a mission to Green Our Vaccines in 2008.
Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carrey went on a mission to Green Our Vaccines in 2008.

We know that there is no science to support the anti-vaccine movement.

History isn’t on their side either.

So what’s left?

How do they push misinformation and myths about vaccines to scare parents away from vaccinating and protecting their kids?

Slogans of the Anti-Vaccine Movement

In addition to their celebrities and a relative handful of ‘experts,’ the modern antivaccine movement makes effective use of very catchy slogans to scare people away from getting educated about vaccines and vaccinating their kids.

If there is a RISK, there must be a CHOICE.

This is one of the more recent and also one of the more powerful slogans that we have seen. It implies that the choice over skipping or delaying vaccines is being taken away and that the only risk comes from the vaccines themselves.

But like most slogans used as propaganda tools, there is little behind it.

Parents nearly always have a choice on whether or not to vaccinate their kids, even if they live in a state without non-medical exceptions.

Vaccine mandates are laws that say you must be fully vaccinated to attend school. Instead of homeschooling their intentionally unvaccinated kids, some parents think that they must have even more choices though.

In addition to overestimating the risks from vaccines, these folks greatly underestimate the risks of getting a vaccine-preventable disease from skipping vaccines, both to their own kids and to the rest of us in the community.

They are simply increasing our risk and limiting our choices to keep our own kids safe and healthy.

You can always get Vaccinated, but you can never get Unvaccinated.

This slogan is likely a surprise to all of the folks who push (sell) regimens that claim to detox kids of their vaccines, or more specifically, all of the “toxins, poisons, and chemicals” that were supposedly in the vaccines they got.

It is also a sad reminder to all of those families who skipped or delayed a vaccine a little too long – long enough for their child to get a life-threatening vaccine-preventable disease.

This slogan really just highlights the fact that anti-vaccine do not really understand the risks of delaying or skipping vaccines. That’s despite the fact that studies have shown that following a non-standard, parent-selected, delayed protection vaccine schedule simply puts kids at risk for vaccine-preventable diseases, without any benefits of fewer side effects.

And for the record, you can get unvaccinated. It is one of the reasons that herd immunity is so important. Just ask the parents of any child who has had to have chemotherapy or a bone marrow transplant and is now immunosuppressed.

Green Our Vaccines.

Jenny McCarthy and Jim Carrey led the “Green Our Vaccines” rally back in 2008.

In 2008, Jenny McCarthy ran a full page ad in USA Today warning about toxins, autism, and the "whopping increase" in vaccines kids were getting.
In 2008, Jenny McCarthy ran a full page ad in USA Today warning about toxins, autism, and the “whopping increase” in vaccines kids were getting.

Although they always claimed they were not anti-vaccine, they helped pushed the idea that vaccines were full of toxins.

They aren’t.

Vaccine ingredients are safe.

Too many, Too soon.

Jenny McCarthy can likely also be credited with creating with idea that kids get too many vaccines at too early an age.

Our kids certainly do get more vaccines than they did in the 1970s and 80s, but that simply means more protection from vaccine-preventable diseases that used to be killers, like Haemophilus influenzae type b and Streptococcus pneumoniae.

Today’s vaccines have fewer antigens than ever too, even though kids get more vaccines than they used to. But certainly not more than they can easily and safely handle.

Vaccination is not Immunization.

This idea is pushed by a chiropractor, who also talks about “pure blood.”

If you believe that vaccination is not immunization, then how did vaccines help eradicate smallpox and how are they helping to eliminate and control other vaccine preventable diseases, like polio, measles, and rubella, etc.

And that’s the whole point. Many anti-vaccine folks don’t really believe that vaccines work. That helps them justify their decision to skip or delay vaccinating their kids.

Even if you thought that vaccines had too many side effects, if you also admitted that they worked to protect your kids, then your anti-vaccine views would likely produce a high level of cognitive dissonance. So instead you cling to these types of slogans. And if your kid does get a vaccine-preventable disease, you’ll still feel okay, because you will blame it on shedding from someone who just got vaccinated.

I’m not anti-vaccine, I’m pro-safe vaccine

The problem with this slogan, and in general, using it as an anti-vaccine argument, is that vaccines are safe. They are not 100% safe, but no one claims that they are.

Serious side effects from vaccines are very rare though.

People who rally against already safe vaccines, claiming that they say are full of ‘toxins’ and wanting even safer vaccines before they will vaccinate their kids, are not really pro-vaccine.

Neither are any of the folks who push these slogans, all of which are pure anti-vaccine propaganda.

What to Know About the Slogans of the Anti-Vaccine Movement

Catchy slogans are one of the ways that the anti-vaccine movement uses to push  misinformation about vaccines.

More About Slogans of the Anti-Vaccine Movement

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Which Vaccines Are Vegan

The rabies vaccine is made with gelatin. Are you going to skip it if your vegan child is bit by a rabid dog?
This rabies vaccine is made with gelatin. Are you going to skip it if your vegan child is bit by a rabid dog?

Vegans do not eat meat, fish, poultry, etc., and also do not use animal products or their by-products.

So in addition to eating a plant-based diet, like vegetarians, you also don’t eat eggs or cheese, drink milk, or wear leather, etc.

Are Vaccines Vegan?

Since many vaccines contain some ingredients, like gelatin, that are derived from animals, they aren’t considered to be vegan.

Still, since there aren’t many vegan vaccines, it isn’t possible or practical to avoid getting vaccinated, so most vegans do seem to get their families vaccinated and protected against vaccine-preventable diseases.

Although people argue both ways, you should consider that:

  • many medicines, like Tamiflu, aren’t vegan, so what happens if you get sick with a vaccine-preventable disease?
  • many of the ingredients in vaccines that aren’t considered to be vegan are removed in final processing and aren’t present in the final vaccine, except in residual amounts
  • vaccines save lives, both human lives and animal lives
  • if you are not vaccinated and you get sick, you put others at risk for getting sick too

And mostly understand that just like people abuse religious exemptions and medical exemptions, many vegans don’t vaccinate solely because they are against vaccines.

Which Vaccines Are Vegan

So are any vaccines really vegan?

A newer flu vaccine, FluBlok, definitely is. It is produced using an insect cell line and grown in serum-free medium.

What To Know About Vaccines and Vegans

You can be vegan and feel comfortable about your decision to get your family vaccinated and protected against vaccine-preventable diseases. You can be a pro-vaccine vegan.

More About Vaccines and Vegans

 

About Those Research Papers Supporting the Vaccine/Autism Link

Have you heard about the ever growing list of research papers that ‘support’ a link between vaccines and autism?

Over 1,000 studies support the fact that vaccines do not cause autism.
Over 1,000 studies support the fact that vaccines do not cause autism!

They don’t.

Are you surprised?

On the other hand, there is plenty of evidence that vaccines do not cause autism.

Research Papers ‘Supporting’ the Vaccine/Autism Link

The list of research papers that supposedly support a link between vaccines and autism has now grown to 131.

That is a lot of research.

“Even though anti-vaccers claim to have lengthy lists of papers supporting their position, most of those papers are irrelevant, used weak designs, and had small sample sizes.”

The Logic of Science

So what’s wrong with the list?

Why doesn’t it really support a link between vaccines and autism?

As pointed out in this review, “Vaccines and autism: A thorough review of the evidence,” the papers on the list include:

  • papers that aren’t about vaccines!
  • papers that aren’t about autism!
  • papers that are about research done on cells or tissues in a petri dish (in vitro trials)
  • animal trials (how do you show that an animal has autism?)
  • papers about elemental mercury or methyl-mercury, even though thimerosal, which was removed from almost all vaccines in 1999, is ethyl-mercury
  • conference abstracts (these haven’t made it into a medical journal yet)
  • case reports (basically a story about a patient)
  • opinion papers
  • non-research papers
  • reviews that “are deceptively only showing the papers that support their position while ignoring all of the papers that refute it”
  • a few that were retracted!

What’s wrong with animal trials and in vitro studies? They are simply among the weakest type of study you can do. The evidence is considered to be much stronger if you can a meta-analysis or systemic review or a randomized control trial.

So they are left with about a dozen studies that are about vaccines and autism, including:

  • SeneffEmpirical Data Confirm Autism Symptoms Related to Aluminum and Acetaminophen Exposure – misuses the VAERS database, so the reports of autism are unconfirmed
  • DeisherImpact of environmental factors on the prevalence of autistic disorder after 1979 – has a ton of problems with the way it analyzed its data
  • NevisonA comparison of temporal trends in United States autism prevalence to trends in suspected environmental factors – tries to correlate autism rates with a list of environmental factors, from maternal obesity, pollution, and glyphosate on foods to aluminum adjuvants in vaccines
  • Tomlejenovic and ShawDo aluminum vaccine adjuvants contribute to the rising prevalence of autism? – “yet another association study. It cannot demonstrate causation,” with tons of other problems
  • Gallagher and GoodmanHepatitis B triple series vaccine and developmental disability in US children aged 1–9 years – a small study that used parental surveys, and although the study found higher levels of early intervention or special education services in vaccinated boys than in unvaccinated boys, it found significantly lower levels of early intervention or special education services in vaccinated girls than in unvaccinated girls?!?
  • Gallagher and GoodmanHepatitis B vaccination of male neonates and autism diagnosis, NHIS 1997–2002 – used a “weak experimental design with a tiny sample size,” just 33 autistic kids
  • Singh – Serological association of measles virus and human herpesvirus-6 with brain autoantibodies in autism – a poorly done paper with so many problems that it has been labeled “fraudulent” and which found “no significant difference in viral levels in the autistic and non-autistic group (which is the opposite of what you would expect if exposure to the virus caused autism)”
  • Singh – Abnormal Measles-Mumps-Rubella Antibodies and CNS Autoimmunity in Children with Autism – discredited by several papers which found No Evidence of Persisting Measles Virus in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells From Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
  • Kawashti – Possible immunological disorders in autism: concomitant autoimmunity and immune tolerance – while trying to link autism to the formation of autoantibodies to casein and gluten antibodies and the immune response to the MMR vaccine, they state that “at this stage, we can conclude that M.M.R. vaccine may not be a cause of autism”
  • MumperCan Awareness of Medical Pathophysiology in Autism Lead to Primary Care Autism Prevention Strategies? – a poorly done “retrospective study with no control group” with a very small sample size
  • KawashimaDetection and sequencing of measles virus from peripheral mononuclear cells from patients with inflammatory bowel disease and autism – a study that was done with Andy Wakefield
  • DeisherEpidemiologic and molecular relationship between vaccine manufacture and autism spectrum disorder prevalence – the study talks about residual human fetal DNA fragments in vaccines and that somehow “fetal DNA in these vaccines can recombine with infant DNA to cause autism.” It can’t.

What about any new studies they say supports a link between vaccines and autism?

Are they about vaccines?

Are they about autism?

What kind of study was it?

What journal was it published in? A predatory, pay-to-publish journal with a low impact value or a real, peer-reviewed, medical journal like PLos One, Lancet, JAMA, or Pediatrics?

Although 6 or 7 studies were recently added to their list, most get excluded right off the bat using the above criteria (not about vaccines or autism, animal studies, in vitro studies, etc.). The one that gets included (and has already been retracted)?

  • MawsonPilot comparative study on the health of vaccinated and unvaccinated 6- to 12- year old U.S. children – published at Open Access Text (is that really a journal?) after it was retracted at another journal last year, this survey of homeschoolers is being billed as the “First Peer-Reviewed Study of Vaccinated versus Unvaccinated Children,” which is strange, as this study was done in 2011!

What were you expecting?

Do you really think that you will first read about a real study proving a link between vaccines and autism will be found on an anti-vaccine website or list?

What To Know About Research Papers Supporting the Vaccine/Autism Link

There is still no research supporting a link between vaccines and autism.

More About Research Papers Supporting the Vaccine/Autism Link

Updated on May 21, 2017

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50 Ways to Get Educated About Vaccines

A Board of Health quarantine poster warning that the premises are contaminated by smallpox.
Have you ever seen a quarantine sign for smallpox on someone’s home? That’s because Vaccines Work!

Have questions about vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases?

Think you have done enough research already?

If that research has you asking for package inserts and requesting low aluminum vaccines, then you might need to rethink how you have been doing your research.

Get Educated About Vaccines

Vaccines are safe, effective, and necessary.

They aren’t full of toxins.

They have been tested together.

Pediatricians do know a lot about vaccines. What they may not know is how to counter every anti-vaccine argument that you might have heard of, read about, or with which one of your family members is scaring you.

“Pediatricians who routinely recommend limiting the numbers of vaccines administered at a single visit such that vaccines are administered late are providing care that deviates from the standard evidence-based schedule recommended by these bodies.”

American Academy of Pediatrics

You can rest assured that these arguments have all been debunked, often many years ago, but they keep coming up, over and over again. In fact, today’s anti-vaccine movement uses many of the same themes as folks used when the first vaccines were introduced over one hundred years ago.

50 Ways To Get Educated About Vaccines

So before deciding to skip or delay any of your child’s vaccines, do some real research about vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases and:

  1. Understand the Pseudoscience Behind the Anti-Vaccine Movement
  2. Review the contraindications to vaccines and even more common, the things commonly misperceived as contraindications
  3. Examine the evidence for the safety of vaccines
  4. Get answers to the 9 Questions For The Pro-Vaxers
  5. Know that Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism
  6. Read about these Five Things I’ve Learned About Vaccines Through 21 Years of Parenting
  7. Learn the Tactics and Tropes of the Anti-vaccine Movement
  8. Know that kids do not get too many vaccines too soon and that vaccines don’t overwhelm your child’s immune system
  9. Understand these Vaccine Safety Basics
  10. Don’t listen to these anti-vaccine celebrities
  11. Get the details of Andrew Wakefield’s fraud
  12. Study why those Graphs That Show Vaccines Don’t Work are just propaganda
  13. Know that you can’t hide your kids in the herd to avoid disease
  14. Read why “Spacing Out” Vaccines Doesn’t Make Them Safer
  15. Wonder why parents misuse religious exemptions to excuse kids from vaccines
  16. See the evidence that Flu Shots Work for Kids Under Two
  17. Review these questions and answers on immunization and vaccine safety
  18. Learn Why My Child With Autism Is Fully Vaccinated
  19. Know that You Can Be the Pro-Life Parent of a Fully Vaccinated Child
  20. See how Having a baby doesn’t change the facts on vaccines
  21. Question Vaccine Injury Stories: the Sacred Cows of the Internet
  22. Read An Open Letter to Expecting Parents and Parents Yet-To-Be about Vaccinating
  23. Know that there is No Clear Evidence that Vaccines Cause Autism
  24. Learn from those who have Left the Anti-Vaccine Movement
  25. Understand why you’re wrong if you think the flu vax gives you the flu
  26. Avoid Cashing In On Fear: The Danger of Dr. Sears
  27. Realize that Almost All Religions Support Immunizations
  28. Learn which vaccines are the most important to get
  29. See that Unvaccinated Children Can Have Autism Too
  30. View Personal Stories of Families Affected by Vaccine-Preventable Diseases
  31. Know who is at risk if you don’t vaccinate your kids
  32. Read about the most common Misconceptions about Vaccines
  33. Review the Benefits vs. Risks of getting vaccinated
  34. Learn about the Ingredients in Vaccines
  35. Realize that vaccines are carefully monitored for safety, even after they have been approved, and it isn’t just by folks reporting side effects to VAERS
  36. Know that those 124 Research Papers Supporting the Vaccine/Autism Link Really Don’t
  37. Understand what Vaccine Package Inserts really do and don’t tell you
  38. See why the CDC Whistleblower really has no whistle to blow
  39. Know that the Vaccine Court did not say that vaccines cause autism
  40. What to consider if Deciding whether to alter the immunization schedule
  41. Learn why Shedding from Vaccines isn’t a danger to your kids
  42. Review even more Misconceptions about Immunizations
  43. Understand The Science Behind Vaccine Research and Testing
  44. Know that your Unvaccinated Child isn’t going to be Healthier than Vaccinated Kids
  45. Realize just how important the HPV vaccine really is
  46. Learn How to Respond to Inaccurate Posts about Vaccines on Social Media
  47. Know that vaccines are studied in pregnant women
  48. See the real dangers in following Jenny McCarthy’s advice
  49. Know that VAERS reports are often misused and understand that parents can report suspected adverse events to VAERS themselves
  50. Fill out a screening questionnaire for contraindications to vaccines

Still have questions? Read one or more of these Vaccine Books

And talk to your doctor about your concerns about vaccines.

Get Educated. Get Vaccinated.

More Ways To Get Educated About Vaccines

These websites and blogs will also help you get educated about vaccines and research any addition questions you might have: