Tag: fake news

Who Is Ethan Lindenberger?

As most folks know, Ethan Lindenberger is the Ohio teen who got himself vaccinated over the objections of his mother, who had always believed that vaccines are dangerous.

He recently testified in Washington, D.C. before the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee Hearing, Vaccines Save Lives: What Is Driving Preventable Disease Outbreaks?

Who Is Ethan Lindenberger?

Not surprisingly, Ethan Lindenberger is getting a lot of attention lately.

Unfortunately, not all of it has been good.

Of course there are conspiracy theories about Ethan Linderberger and his mother…

Along the way to getting vaccinated and a trip to Capitol Hill, he has been attacked on social media from anti-vaccine folks who must see him as some kind of threat.

I remember speaking with my mother about vaccines, and at one point in our discussion she claimed a link existed between vaccines and autism. In response, I presented evidence from the CDC which claimed directly in large bold letters, “There is no link between vaccines and autism.” Within the same article from the CDC on their official website, extensive evidence and studies from the institute of medicine (IOM) were cited. Most would assume when confronted with such strong proof, there would be serious consideration that your views are incorrect. This was not the case for my mother, as her only response was, “that’s what they want you to think.”

Ethan Lindenberger

Now that she sees that “they” have made up conspiracy theories about her own son, will Ethan’s mother understand how the anti-vaccine movement works?

“Conversations like these were what reaffirmed the evidence in defense of vaccinations and proved to me, at least on an anecdotal level, that anti-vaccine beliefs are deeply rooted in misinformation. Despite this, a necessary clarification must be made when discussing this misinformation: anti-vaccine individuals do not root their opinions in malice, but rather a true concern for themselves and other people. Although it may not seem to be true because of the serious implications of choosing not to vaccinate, the entire anti-vaccine movement has gained so much traction because of this fear and concern that vaccines are dangerous.”

Ethan Lindenberger

Who is scaring everyone about vaccines and creating all of this misinformation?

In his testimony, Ethan identified some people that will be familiar to everyone who works to combat anti-vaccine misinformation, including Bob Sears, Del Bigtree, and Larry Cook.

“My story highlights this misinformation and how it spreads. Between social media platforms, to using a parent’s love as a tool, these lies cause people to distrust in vaccination, furthering the impact of a preventable disease outbreak and even contributing to the cause of diseases spreading. This needs to change and I only hope my story contributes to such advancements.”

Ethan Lindenberger

We are lucky that Ethan told his story.

It’s an important story and hopefully everyone who is thinking about skipping or delaying their child’s vaccines will listen to it.

More on Ethan Lindenberger

Did CNN Apologize for Using a Fake Measles Photo?

We have seen a lot of fake stories since the measles outbreaks started.

Will these folks apologize when they realize that it wasn't a photo of a child suffering an adverse reaction to the measles vaccine?
Will these folks apologize when they realize that it wasn’t a photo of a child suffering an adverse reaction to the measles vaccine?

And they are all from the usual suspects.

Did CNN Apologize for Using a Fake Measles Photo?

And no, I’m not talking about the photo from CNN.

It's not a conspiracy...
It’s not a conspiracy…

So what’s up with the photo?

This photo is in the CDC archives.
This photo is in the CDC archives.

The child in the photo doesn’t actually have measles, although he does have a rash that looks like measles.

“This 1968 image depicted the face and back of a young child after receiving a smallpox vaccination in the right shoulder region. Note the erythematous halo surrounding the vaccination site, which can also be seen in PHIL 13321 and 13323, as well as a morbilliform skin rash, i.e., resembling measles, consisting of numerous flattened erythematous, amorphous macules. This child was subsequently diagnosed with roseola vaccinia.”

Public Health Image Library (PHIL)

And it is a photo of a child of a vaccine reaction, a reaction to his smallpox vaccine.

Why did CDC use that photo?

Who knows, but there aren’t a lot of photos of kids with measles out there. They likely found a stock photo of a kid with a rash that looked like measles and used it.

Learn the risk of following the advice of Brandy Vaughan.
Learn the risk of following the advice of Brandy Vaughan.

Still, while they didn’t use a photo of a child with measles, they also didn’t use a photo of a child that got measles from the vaccine, as Brandy Vaughan claims.

And of course, the rest of the story about Washington being under a state of emergency still stands, as measles cases continue to rise.

More on Did CNN Apologize for Using a Fake Measles Photo?

More Fake Measles News!

Have you heard that the latest measles outbreaks in Washington and Oregon are fake news?

Have you read that there is no outbreak?

It’s all part of a conspiracy by the media to push a new vaccine law or a third dose of MMR or something.

What’s the evidence?

More Fake Measles News!

Are you ready for this?

The “evidence” that anti-vaccine sites are using to push their little conspiracy theory about “fake” measles outbreaks is the fact that the CDC hasn’t listed the new cases on their outbreak page!

The page clearly says the the data is updated monthly.

I guess they never noticed that the CDC only updates their Measles Cases and Outbreaks page once a month…

Or that the Pacific Northwest outbreak started just after the last update…

If it really was a hoax, did they ever wonder why the CDC didn’t get it on it when multiple county and state health departments obviously were, as they were publishing almost daily updated case counts?

How silly was the idea of these outbreaks being fake?

As bad as the crooked face theory of vaccine injury?

Or the idea that vaccines are designed to kill people?

I’m not sure, but it certainly ranks with the worst ideas that anti-folks have come up with over the years.

More on Anti-Vaccine Measles Propaganda


Fake News About Measles Outbreaks?

Many news organizations ran with a story about a multi-state measles outbreak recently.

The CDC tweeted a correction about the multi-state measles outbreak story.
The CDC tweeted a correction about the multi-state measles outbreak story.

They got something wrong though.

There is no ongoing, single, multi-state outbreak of measles this year.

Fake News About Measles Outbreaks?

Is it understandable that some media outlets would have been confused by recent CDC reports?

Not really.

The CDC Measles Cases and Outbreaks page hadn’t been updated since late-July and is still reporting case numbers that are “current as of July 14, 2018,” so there really was no recent CDC report to generate all of this extra attention.

“From January 1 to July 14, 2018, 107 people from 21 states (Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Michigan, Missouri, Nevada, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, and Washington) and the District of Colombia were reported to have measles.”

CDC on Measles Cases and Outbreaks

Although it has been changed to say “107 individual cases of measles have been confirmed in 21 states,” there was nothing to indicate it was a single outbreak that the CDC was monitoring as many sites reported:

Few sites were immune to using a click-bait title to scare folks about the "outbreak."
Few sites were immune to using a click-bait title to scare folks about the “outbreak.”

Unfortunately, many of these reports are still online.

How did it happen?

It’s likely because you have reports from organizations and websites that seem to want to push out content, but don’t have much of a budget to pay health or medical writers to make sure it is accurate.

2018 Measles Cases and Outbreaks

It’s also unfortunate that some of these sites, in trying to correct the idea of a single, nation-wide outbreak, are now trying to minimize this year’s measles outbreaks.

No, there isn’t one large outbreak that is spreading across the United States, but there are a lot of smaller outbreaks, some of which are still ongoing.

And these outbreaks are not something that should still be expected, as we have had a safe and effective measles vaccine for over 50 years and measles was declared eliminated in the United States in 2000!

There is also something very much different about 2018, that not surprisingly, no one is reporting about.

With over 107 cases, things seem very similar to last year right, when we had about 118 cases?

The thing is, in 2017, there was one large outbreak, in Minnesota, with 79 people.

In 2015, at least 139 of 189 cases were from just three large outbreaks, in California (Disneyland), Illinois, and South Dakota.

See what’s different?

This year seems to have more individual cases in more states, each with the potential to grow into one of those big outbreaks.

Why?

You can blame the rise in measles outbreaks in Europe and other parts of the world. And some folks not getting vaccinated and protected and exposing the rest of us when they get sick.

Putting us at risk even though measles is a life-threatening infection, a safe and effective vaccine has been available for 50 years, and every anti-vaccine myth that scares folks has been refuted a thousand times.

That’s the story.

Who’s telling it?

More on Reporting on Measles Outbreaks