Tag: hpv vaccine

ACIP June 2019 Update

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) holds three meetings each year at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia to review scientific data and vote on vaccine recommendations.

Topics at the ACIP June 2019 meeting, held on June 26 and 27, included:

  • 9vHPV Immunogenicity and Safety Trial in Mid-Adult Females
  • Overview of Health Economic Models for HPV Vaccination of Mid-Adults
  • HPV Vaccines Evidence to Recommendations (EtR) Framework
  • HPV Vaccines Work Group Considerations and Proposed Policy Options
  • Considerations for PCV13 use among adults 65 years or older and summary of the Evidence to Recommendations (EtR) Framework Proposed policy options
  • Combination Vaccines – Summary and Relevant Evidence to Recommendation Information
  • Update: Safety Monitoring and Surveillance for Recombinant Zoster Vaccine (RZV)
  • Herpes Zoster Work Group Summary
  • Pertussis Vaccines EtR Framework, Work Group Considerations and Proposed Policy Options
  • Rabies Vaccine
  • 2018-19 U.S. Influenza Activity
  • 2018-19 Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness
  • 2018-19 Influenza Vaccine Safety
  • Influenza Vaccine Proposed Recommendations for 2019-20
  • Proposed Recommendations for Use of Hepatitis A
  • Dengue Epidemiology in the U.S.
  • Dengvaxia Phase III Clinical Trials and Long Term Follow Up
  • Dengue Vaccine Work Group Considerations and Next Steps

If you haven’t been watching the meeting, the slides, videos, and minutes will be available later.

ACIP June 2019 Meeting Votes

And ACIP members voted on a number of issues, including:

Passed.
Passed.
This changes the 2014 ACIP recommendation to give PCV13 to all adults 65 years or older.
A series of votes on DTaP, Hib, IPV, and hepB got Vaxelis, the newly FDA approved hexavalent vaccine, added to the VFC program.

Coming up tomorrow will be votes on flu, hepatitis A, and meningococcal B vaccines.

More on the ACIP June 2019 Meeting

New Vaccine Bills and Laws in 2019

California passed a new vaccine law, SB 277, in 2015.

With the passage of SB 277, California joined Mississippi and West Virginia as the only states that do not allow either religious or personal belief vaccine exemptions.

A few other states passed new vaccine laws of their own in the following years.

Despite what anti-vaccine folks might think, not one of the new laws means that anyone is forcing kids to get vaccinated though.

New Vaccine Bills and Laws in 2019

The idea of vaccine mandates is a big issue as we continue to see outbreaks of measles around the world.

New vaccine laws being proposed across the United States include:

  • House Bill 2505 in Arizona will change their non-medical exemptions from personal to religious
  • Senate Bill 1201 in Arizona will require schools to post immunization rates on their websites
  • House Bill 7005 in Connecticut would permit ordained, commissioned and licensed members of the clergy to acknowledge parental statements concerning religious objections to vaccinations required for enrollment in public and nonpublic schools, instead of school nurses.
  • Senate Bill 354 in Florida updates their immunization registry
  • Senate Bill 1659 in Illinois adds the HPV vaccine to the list of childhood vaccines that kids receive before starting 6th grade
  • HF 206 in Iowa eliminates the religious vaccine exemption.
  • Senate Bill 133 in Kentucky adds vaccine requirements for college students
  • Legislative Document 798 has been sent to the Committee on Education and Cultural Affairs in Maine and would remove non-medical vaccine exemptions
  • SD 1520 in Massachusetts adds the HPV vaccine to the list of childhood vaccines that kids receive
  • Assembly Bill 3818 in New Jersey clarifies the religious exemption to vaccination, so that a general philosophical or moral objection to getting vaccinated will no longer count as a true religious exemption
  • Senate Bill 298 in New York adds the HPV vaccine to the list of childhood vaccines that kids receive
  • Senate Bill 925 in Oklahoma requires school districts to report exemption rates
  • House Bill 2783 in Oregon requires parents to submit a form signed by a health care practitioner if they are not going to vaccinate their kids and a signed certificate verifying that they completed a vaccine educational module
  • Senate Bill 329 in Texas simply requires schools to post how many kids are claiming vaccine exemptions
  • House Bill 238 in Vermont eliminates religious exemptions
  • House Bill 1638 has already passed a Health Care and Wellness Committee in Washington and will remove personal or philosophical exemptions for the MMR vaccine
  • Senate Bill 5841 in Washington will remove personal or philosophical exemptions for all vaccines

It’s easy to navigate the new laws.

Get educated and get your kids vaccinated. Vaccines are safe, with few risks, vaccines work, and vaccines are necessary.

Be a vaccine advocate and make sure your state legislators know that you support strong vaccine laws that will keep us all protected from vaccine-preventable diseases, as more and more folks try and abuse vaccine exemptions.

What To Know About Vaccine Mandate Laws

Vaccine mandate laws are expanding as we are seeing more outbreaks of vaccine preventable diseases.

More Information on Vaccine Mandate Laws:

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I’m Not Anti-Vaccine, I Just Don’t Believe in the HPV Vaccine

Believe it or not, there are some parents who get their kids each and every vaccine, but skip the one that protects them from cancer.

I’m Not Anti-Vaccine, I Just Don’t Believe in the HPV Vaccine

Why?

HPV Vaccine is Cancer Prevention.

That’s a good question.

And although they won’t have a good answer, some of their reasons include that:

  • the HPV vaccine is too new – even though Gardasil was first approved in 2006 and the first phase 1 and phase 2 trials began in 1997!
  • they don’t think it is necessary – even though about 4,200 women die of cervical cancer each year (that’s just in the United States), even in this age of routine pap tests
  • it might lead their kids to have early sex or unprotected sex – even though studies show it won’t
  • Michele Bachmann once said it caused mental retardation – even though she had no evidence to support her claim
  • the HPV vaccine is too controversial – any “controversy” about Gardasil and Cervarix is made up by anti-vaccine folks
  • HPV vaccines can cause POTS, ASIA, primary ovarian failure, venous blood clots, behavior problems, or multiple sclerosis, etc. – even though over and over, studies have found HPV vaccines to be safe and to not cause any of the other serious side effects or vaccine induced diseases you read about on the Internet that scare you away from vaccinating and protecting your kids
  • it is banned in Utah – even though that isn’t true
  • it doesn’t provide life-long protection – even though the protection has been found to be long-lasting, as long as we have been giving the vaccine so far
  • it is banned in Japan and France – even though HPV vaccines aren’t banned anywhere and are actually on the immunization schedule in at least 64 countries
  • Katie Couric once did a scary segment on HPV vaccines – well, she did but later apologized… after being called out for pushing anti-vaccine misinformation
  • an HPV vaccine researcher says it’s dangerous – no, the HPV vaccine researcher, Diane Harper, actually says it is a safe vaccine
  • HPV vaccines are just for girls – even though there are around 11,000 cases of HPV induced cancer in men each year, including anal cancer and cancers of the mouth/throat and penis
  • their kids are too young and can get it later, when they are older – even though protection is likely better when they get the vaccine when they are younger, and you don’t want to wait too long, when you increase the chance that they will have had sex and will already be exposed to HPV

So why aren’t you getting your kids vaccinated and protected… against cancer?

Need to do more research? Read the links below and then schedule your kids for their HPV vaccine.

More on HPV Vaccine Safety

Should You Get an Extra Dose of Gardasil9?

Believe it or not, the first human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was approved way back in 2006.

HPV Vaccine is Cancer Prevention.

And believe it or not, we are now on our third version of the vaccine, which provides protection against even more strains of HPV.

HPV Vaccine Timeline

So we have gone from:

  • Cervarix – HPV serotypes 16, 18 (2006)
  • Gardasil – HPV serotypes 6, 11, 16, 18 (2006)
  • Gardasil9 – HPV serotypes 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 (2014)

And with each new vaccine, there comes more protection against anal and genital warts and anal, genital, head and neck, and cervical cancers.

Gardasil9, the only HPV vaccine available in the United States, increases the protection level against cervical cancer from 70 to 90%!

Should You Get an Extra Dose of Gardasil9?

Has your child already finished their HPV vaccine series?

With which HPV vaccine?

To be clear, if they have finished the series, then they are considered to be fully vaccinated and protected.

“Persons who have completed a valid series with any HPV vaccine do not need any additional doses.”

National Cancer Institute on Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

Remember, the key, high-risk strains that cause most HPV-associated cancer are HPV-16 and 18, which are present in all of the HPV vaccines.

The extra coverage in Gardasil9 to HPV strains 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 could prevent an additional 10% of invasive HPV associated cancers or about 3,800 cases each year though, mostly in women.

Should you get any extra doses of Gardasil9 for this extra coverage?

“Administration of a 3-dose regimen of 9vHPV vaccine to adolescent girls and young women 12-26 years of age who are prior qHPV vaccine recipients is highly immunogenic with respect to HPV types 31/33/45/52/58 and generally well tolerated.”

Garland et al on Safety and immunogenicity of a 9-valent HPV vaccine in females 12-26 years of age who previously received the quadrivalent HPV vaccine.

While safe to do and it works, there is no formal recommendation that anyone actually get any extra doses of Gardasil9 at this time.

It is something to consider if you want the extra protection though.

Will we get even more coverage in future HPV vaccines? The future might come in different types of vaccines or even in therapeutic vaccines. There doesn’t seem to be a new version of Gardasil with expanded strain coverage in the immediate pipeline though.

More on Getting an Extra Dose of HPV9