Tag: wild strains

Should I Blame the Vaccine If I’m Sick and I Just Got Vaccinated?

We all know the saying, correlation equals causation, right?

So if you get an MMR vaccine and get the measles a week later, it has to be the vaccine, right?

Should I Blame the Vaccine If I’m Sick and I Just Got Vaccinated?

Actually, no.

“Correlation does not imply causation.”

Although it would be very easy to blame the vaccine, if you keep in mind that the saying is actually “correlation does not imply causation,” maybe you will do a little investigating and see if something else is to blame.

Some things to consider and ask yourself:

  1. Do I really have measles? Remember that it is not uncommon to develop a fever and a rash about 7 to 12 days after getting an MMR vaccine. This is a very common, mild vaccine reaction. It doesn’t mean that you have measles or even a mild case of the measles.
  2. Was I recently exposed to someone with measles? If you were vaccinated because you were exposed to measles during an outbreak, then there is a good chance that the vaccine hasn’t had a chance to work yet and you actually developed measles from being exposed to the wild virus.
  3. Do I have the wild type or a vaccine strain of measles? Testing can be done to tell which strain of measles you have and to see if it is a wild type or vaccine strain.

Are there any examples of folks having wild type disease if they get sick shortly after being vaccinated?

Not surprisingly, there are a lot of these types of examples.

“Vaccine strains are poorly or not transmissible and prompt differentiation between wild-type and vaccine strains allows for optimal management and public health action.”

Pabbaraju et al on Simultaneous Detection and Differentiation between Wild-Type and Vaccine Measles Viruses by a Multiplex Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay

What about examples of folks getting sick with vaccine strain measles and other diseases? Not so many.

The clinical diagnosis could just as easily have been wild type measles and not a vaccine strain, as there was a lot of measles in the the UK in 1988.
The clinical diagnosis could just as easily have been wild type measles, as there was a lot of measles in the the UK in 1988.

Most of the published examples are case reports without evidence of a vaccine strain.

What about the kid in Canada that got measles after her MMR vaccine?

“We describe a case of vaccine-associated measles in a two-year-old patient from British Columbia, Canada, in October 2013, who received her first dose of measles-containing vaccine 37 days prior to onset of prodromal symptoms.”

Murti et al on Case of vaccine-associated measles five weeks post-immunisation, British Columbia, Canada, October 2013.

She had symptoms of measles and a vaccine strain and was reported as “the first case of MMR vaccine-associated measles.” Well, at least the first case that occurred so long after getting vaccinated. Still, they note that “clinically significant vaccine-associated illness is rare.”

What about all of the people in California and Michigan who supposedly had vaccine-strain measles?

This is not vaccine strain measles! It is people with a rash or fever after being vaccinated. They don't have measles though.
This is not vaccine strain measles! It is people with a rash or fever after being vaccinated. They don’t have measles though.

Anti-vaccine folks made that up!

When It’s a Wild-Type Virus

What’s the most obvious evidence against the idea that vaccines and shedding are responsible for causing outbreaks?

For one thing, despite the recent uptick, cases of vaccine-preventable diseases are way down from the pre-vaccine era. That’s not what you would expect if vaccine-induced disease was common or if contacts of those who were recently vaccinated could easily get sick from shedding.

And we have evidence against vaccine induced disease.

When kids get chicken pox shortly after being vaccinated, they often have a wild strain. They don’t have breakthrough chicken pox.

“All of 57 vaccinees with breakthrough varicella, clinically diagnosed on the basis of a generalized maculopapular or vesicular rash, in which there was amplifiable DNA [corrected], had wild-type VZV infection based on analysis of viral DNA. “

LaRussa on Viral strain identification in varicella vaccinees with disseminated rashes.

Same thing with measles.

Want to avoid these situations in which you could get a wild strain of a vaccine-preventable disease?

Don’t skip or delay your child’s vaccines!

More On Wild-Type and Vaccine Measles Viruses

Was the Measles Outbreak in Michigan Caused by Vaccine-Strain Measles?

Anti-vaccine folks are pushing some new misinformation about measles outbreaks.

Was the Measles Outbreak in Michigan Caused by Vaccine-Strain Measles?

What is it this time?

The Michigan measles outbreak was not caused by a vaccine strain of measles.
The Michigan measles outbreak was not caused by a vaccine strain of measles.

Vaccine-strain measles?

Causing an outbreak?!?

Since a vaccine-strain has never triggered an outbreak before, you would think these folks would be a little more skeptical about this “news.”

So what’s the real story?

“The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) is reducing the statewide count of measles for 2019 to 39 following further testing of two of the cases.”

State measles cases reduced to 39 following additional testing

So there is a hint of truth to their new rumor…

“One child in Washtenaw County had been potentially exposed to measles and that child, along with an Oakland County child, had both been recently vaccinated. Their symptoms and initial test results classified them as measles cases. Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) protocol, additional genotype testing was conducted and determined they were not measles cases. “

State measles cases reduced to 39 following additional testing

On further testing though, they didn’t have wild strain measles. They had a vaccine strain – because they had recently been vaccinated.

These two kids likely had a fever and rash and because they had recently been exposed to measles, it was initially assumed that they had measles. That was likely a safe bet in the middle of a large measles outbreak.

But as often seems to happen, anti-vaccine folks get confused by vaccine reactions and vaccine associated measles.

So they didn’t have measles induced by the vaccine. They had a simple vaccine reaction, with a fever and rash.

What’s the difference? All of the other symptoms of measles!

The Southeast Michigan outbreak, which included 44 cases, began in mid-March.
The Southeast Michigan outbreak, which included 44 cases, began in mid-March.

As ridiculous as it is to have to say this, the Michigan measles outbreak was not canceled. And like other outbreaks, the Michigan measles outbreak was not caused by a vaccine or shedding.

More on the Michigan Measles Outbreak

Who Gets SSPE?

Have you heard that you can get SSPE from the MMR?

Apparently it’s in the vaccine insert

Who Gets SSPE?

Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) occurs after a natural measles infection.

You won't get SSPE if you don't get measles.

It is not caused by MMR or any measles containing vaccine.

Of course, the measles vaccine is not 100% effective, so it is possible that you could still get measles after being vaccinated. And those folks who get measles after getting vaccinated could be at risk to get SSPE, but even then, their SSPE would be caused by wild measles virus, not a vaccine strain.

“Available epidemiological data are consistent with a directly protective effect of vaccine against SSPE mediated by preventing measles.”

Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and measles vaccination

Again, SSPE is caused by natural measles infections and the wild type measles virus.

Tragically, after big outbreaks of measles, we start to see more cases of SSPE, with the greatest in children who get measles at a young age.

And SSPE is universally fatal in these children, who develop symptoms about six to eight years after recovering from having measles.

That the symptoms of SSPE don’t develop until long after you have recovered from measles is why the condition is often described as a time-bomb.

A time-bomb that you can’t stop.

Want to avoid getting SSPE? Get vaccinated and protected against measles.

More on Getting SSPE

Why You Have No Business Skipping the MMR Vaccine?

Believe it or not, some folks are still pushing misinformation to scare people away from getting vaccinated and protected against measles.

The Disney outbreak was not caused by a vaccine strain!
The Disney outbreak was not caused by a vaccine strain!

Ironically, this guy talks about propaganda, manipulating parents, and media lies without saying anything that is truthful.

As I’m sure you are aware, the Disney measles outbreak was not caused by a vaccine strain.

Anti-vaccine folks frequently misinterpret the meaning of these vaccine strain cases. They are people who were recently vaccinated and develop a fever and rash. They do not have measles and are not part of the outbreak counts.
Anti-vaccine folks frequently misinterpret the meaning of these vaccine strain cases. They are people who were recently vaccinated and develop a fever and rash. They do not have measles and are not part of the outbreak counts.

The outbreak strain during the Disney outbreak was B3, which can be traced to outbreaks in Africa and the Eastern Mediterranean. Neither the Disneyland outbreak nor any outbreak has been caused by a vaccine strain of measles.

What about the idea that measles is now harmless???

Or that measles isn’t deadly is a developed country with a well-nourished population???

In response to a post praising Italy's decision to dilute their new vaccine laws, some folks thought it was funny that people were dying of measles.
Italy is a developed country with a very well-nourished population, and still, there have been at least 12 measles deaths since 2017.

Why have so many people died with measles in Europe recently if it is so harmless?

Did Chris Kirckof like his own post?
Did Chris Kirckof like his own post?

Yes, research it for yourself and you will find the complications of recent measles infections he left out, including the pregnant woman with who had a miscarriage during the 2013 measles outbreak in Brooklyn.

And the 8 SSPE deaths since 2009.

Are you wondering why he started his measles counts from 2014? It was to avoid mentioning the death of the woman in Washington in 2015.

Mostly remember that the reason we don’t see even more measles cases, measles complications, and measles deaths in the United States is simply because most people are vaccinated and protected.

Vaccines are safe, with few risks, and are obviously necessary.

More on Don’t Skip the MMR Vaccine