Tag: vaccine safety systems

Vaccines Statistics and Numbers

To help you get better educated about vaccines, it can help to learn some vaccine statistics and some other numbers behind vaccines.

Vaccine Statistics

For all of the talk of some folks delaying or skipping vaccines, do you know how many vaccines are given each day?

According to the CDC, from 2006 to 2016, at least 3,153,876,236 doses of vaccines were distributed in the United States. These are the vaccines that are covered by the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program, such as DTaP, MMR, Hepatitis A and B, HPV, and flu, etc.

That’s over 286 million doses each year!

The WHO reports that 85% of infants around the world receive vaccines against DTP, polio, measles, and hepatitis B.
The WHO reports that 85% of infants around the world receive vaccines against DTP, polio, measles, and hepatitis B.

How about worldwide?

That’s harder to know, but consider that the World Health Organization reports that 85% of infants worldwide, or almost 100 million infants, get at least:

  • 3 doses of DTP
  • 3 doses of hepatitis B
  • at least one doses of measles
  • 3 doses of polio

Plus, an increasing number are getting vaccines to protect them against Hib, pneumococcal disease, rotavirus, HPV, meningitis A, mumps, rubella, tetanus, and yellow fever.

“UNICEF supplies vaccines reaching 45 per cent of the world’s children under five years old as part of its commitment to improving child survival.”

How many vaccine doses are we talking about?

A lot. UNICEF alone buys 2.8 billion doses of vaccines each year! Those vaccines are then distributed to children in over 100 countries.

Vaccine-Preventable Disease Statistics

As impressive as the number of vaccines that are given each year are the numbers about what happens when we give vaccines:

  • there are 2 to 3 million fewer deaths in the world each year because people are vaccinated and protected
  • in the Unites States, every $1 spent on vaccines provides $3 in direct benefits and up to $10 in benefits if you include societal costs
  • in developing countries, every $1 spent on vaccines provides $16 in direct benefits, but that goes up to $44 when you take “into account the broader economic impact of illness”
  • for children born in the United States during “1994–2013, routine childhood immunization was estimated to prevent 322 million illnesses (averaging 4.1 illnesses per child) and 21 million hospitalizations (0.27 per child) over the course of their lifetimes and avert 732,000 premature deaths from vaccine-preventable illnesses,” and it also “will potentially avert $402 billion in direct costs and $1.5 trillion in societal costs because of illnesses prevented”
  • only two countries continue to have wild polio – Afghanistan and Pakistan – and together, they only had 21 cases in 2017

Still, only one vaccine-preventable disease, smallpox, has been eradicated.

And worldwide, more than 3 million people still die from vaccine-preventable diseases every year, many of them young children.

Other Vaccine Numbers

There are some other numbers about vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases folks should know:

  • the number of pediatricians who got a $3 million vaccine bonus – zero
  • the number of vaccines that contain antifreeze as an ingredient – zero
  • the number of vaccines that contain peanut oil as an ingredient – zero
  • the number of studies that link vaccines to autism – zero
  • the number of diseases that homeopathic vaccines can prevent – zero
  • the number of anti-vaccine sites that mention any benefits of vaccines – zero
  • the number of VAERS reports that are thought to be unrelated to a vaccine – 53%
  • the number of VAERS reports that are thought to be definitely caused by a vaccine – 3%
  • the number of definite VAERS reports that were serious – 1 (anaphylaxis)
  • the number of myths about vaccines that can scare you away from vaccinating and protecting your kids – 100s

Vaccines work. Vaccines are safe. Vaccines are necessary.

Get vaccinated and protected.

What’s the biggest number you should be thinking about? Way too many people are still getting and dying from vaccine-preventable diseases.

What to Know About Vaccine Statistics

Although more work needs to be done to protect more people, vaccine statistics clearly show that vaccines work and that they are safe and necessary.

More on Vaccines Statistics

Vaccines are Safe

Vaccines have side effects.

Fortunately, they are usually very mild.

And understanding that vaccines are safe, makes getting their kids vaccinated an easy decision for most parents, as they understand that the many benefits of vaccines far outweigh any possible risks.

How Do We Know Vaccines Are Safe?

If you are on the fence about vaccines, simply saying they are safe might not be enough for you.

“​Over the previous 40 years the IOM has conducted over 60 vaccine safety studies, including this comprehensive review of the immunization schedule. The IOM committee did not find any evidence of major safety concerns related to receiving on-time vaccinations according to the Recommended Immunization Schedule for children. They concluded that this should help to reassure stakeholders. Further, they noted that while the receiving on-time vaccines was not harmful, it was strongly associated with reducing vaccine-preventable diseases. ​”

American Academy of Pediatrics on Vaccine Safety: Examine the Evidence

How do we really know vaccines are safe?

A 2013 report about vaccines from the Institute of Medicine uncovered no evidence of major safety concerns.
A 2013 report about vaccines from the Institute of Medicine uncovered no evidence of major safety concerns.
  • vaccines go through a long period of pre-licensure testing and evaluation when being developed to make sure they are safe and that they work before they are approved
  • vaccines are tested together
  • vaccines are continually monitored after they are made, to make sure they maintain their potency, are kept at the proper temperature, and other quality testing
  • several post-licensure vaccine safety systems monitor for safety issues, including VAERS, the Vaccine Safety Datalink, and the Clinical Immunization Safety Assessment (CISA) Project and other global vaccine safety systems
  • 40 years of safety reports from the Institute of Medicine (IOM)
  • reports from the Global Advisory Committee on Vaccine Safety, which has reviewed and commented on everything from aluminum adjuvants and the potential for immunogenic overload (too many too soon) to the safety of HPV vaccines

And it is important to know that much of the information that you hear and read that is trying to scare you about vaccines and vaccine ingredients is simply not true and easily debunked.

What to Know About Vaccine Safety

From years and years of pre-licensure vaccine safety testing to continual post-licensure vaccine safety monitoring, we can be confident that vaccines are safe.

More on Knowing Vaccines are Safe

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Global Vaccine Side Effect Reporting Systems

Has your child had a bad reaction to a vaccine or what you think is a vaccine injury?

Did you or your pediatrician report it?

Reporting Side Effects to VAERS

The CDC advises that “all significant adverse events that occur after vaccination of adults and children, even if you are not sure whether the vaccine caused the adverse event.”

But VAERS isn’t for everyone.

VAERS is for anyone who gives or receives a licensed vaccine in the United States.

Global Vaccine Side Effect Reporting Systems

What to folks do outside the United States?

In Canada, Adverse Events following Immunization (AEFI) forms are submitted to the Canadian Adverse Events Following Immunization Surveillance System.
In Canada, Adverse Events following Immunization (AEFI) forms are submitted to the Canadian Adverse Events Following Immunization Surveillance System.

Not surprisingly, most countries have a reporting system for possible adverse events to vaccines that is similar to VAERS, including, but not limited to:

You can also report possible side effects directly to vaccine manufacturers.

And like our Vaccine Safety Datalink, in addition to having a passive reporting system, like VAERS, many countries have an active vaccine safety surveillance system to make sure that their vaccines are safe:

  • Australia – AusVaxSafety monitors 156 surveillance sites
  • Canada – IMPACT or Canada’s Immunization Monitoring Program ACTive that actively monitors “12 Canadian centres, which represent about 90% of all tertiary care pediatric beds in Canada” for “adverse events following immunization, vaccine failures and selected infectious diseases that are, or will be, vaccine preventable.”
  • UK – the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD)

A lot of this work is also done as part of the World Health Organization’s Global Vaccine Safety Initiative (GVSI). In fact, many (about 110) WHO member countries report to the VigiBase system that is actively monitored by the WHO’s Uppsala Monitoring Centre.

What to Know About Global Vaccine Side Effect Reporting Systems

Passive and active vaccine side effect reporting systems in countries around the world help to make sure that our vaccines are safe.

More on Global Vaccine Side Effect Reporting Systems

 

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