Tag: recommendations

Which Vaccines Are Gluten Free?

Why does gluten sometimes come up in discussions about vaccines?

Is it because a vaccine to treat people with Celiac disease is being tested?

Probably not.

It is more likely that it is because some people worry that vaccines contain gluten.

Which Vaccines Are Gluten-Free?

So which vaccines are gluten-free?

All vaccines are gluten-free. Do they need to labeled 'gluten-free' to convince some vaccine hesitant folks?
All vaccines are gluten-free. Do they need to labeled ‘gluten-free’ to convince some vaccine hesitant folks?

Fortunately, they all are, so you don’t have to worry about skipping or delaying your child’s vaccines if they have Celiac disease, a gluten sensitivity, or if you are simply following a gluten-free diet.

Vaccines and Food Allergies

Non-active components of vaccines can rarely trigger allergic reactions, including antibiotics and latex.

What about non-active vaccine ingredients that might worry someone with food allergies?

There actually are some, including eggs, milk, gelatin, and yeast.

Talk to your pediatrician or a pediatric allergist if you are concerned about vaccine allergies. They can review the “Algorithm for treatment of patients with hypersensitivity reactions after vaccines,” which “provides a rational and organized approach for the evaluation and treatment of patients with suspected hypersensitivity.”

This is especially important if you think that your child is allergic to all vaccines, something that is almost unheard of, as vaccines have different components and are made in different ways.

You don’t have to worry about gluten though.

What To Know About Vaccines and Gluten

There is no gluten in vaccines and vaccines are actually in development to treat people with gluten sensitivity.

For More Information on Vaccine Allergies

 

How Pediatricians Should Talk to Vaccine Hesitant Parents

Vaccine hesitant parents sometimes don’t get time to talk with a pediatrician about vaccines.

They might not even get an appointment with their new baby if they express doubts about wanting to vaccinate their kids or about wanting to skip or delay some vaccines.

That’s unfortunate, as I think many would choose to vaccinate and protect their kids if they got answers to the anti-vaccine talking points that scare them.

Myth busting by itself doesn’t always seem to work though.

How Pediatricians Should Talk to Vaccine Hesitant Parents

It is understandable that pediatricians get frustrated talking to some anti-vaccine parents.

Pediarix, Hib, Prevnar, and Rota vaccines have been prepared for an infant at her well child visit.
Pediarix, Hib, Prevnar, and Rota vaccines for my daughter at her 2 month well visit 10 years ago. Photo by Vincent Iannelli, MD

One strategy that might work includes asking open ended questions about why the parent is hesitant to vaccinate their kids. Next, while responding to a few of their biggest concerns, be sure to affirm what the parent is saying and use reflective listening.

How might these vaccination-focused motivational interviewing techniques work during a typical visit at a pediatrician’s office? Instead of getting frustrated and accepting a copy of Dr. Bob’s alternative schedule, you might ask them:

  • What specifically are you afraid of?
  • You are really worried that your child might get sick after their vaccines.
  • It sounds like you think kids get too many shots.

Now, address a few of those concerns.

Pediatricians often feel like they don’t have enough time to have long discussions about vaccines, when they also need to talk about many other important topics at each visit, including nutrition, development, and safety, etc. The vaccine talk doesn’t have to be extensive though. Just get it started and come back to it again at the next visit.

You can also recommend some good vaccine books and websites to help parents do more research.

Talking About Vaccines

It is not enough to simply tell your vaccine hesitant parents to read a book, visit a website, or offer them some handouts though. It is important that pediatricians also talk to parents about vaccines.

Study after study show that pediatricians are the most influential, most convincing, and most used source of information about vaccines for many parents.

“How providers initiate and pursue vaccine recommendations is associated with parental vaccine acceptance.”

Opel et al on The Architecture of Provider-Parent Vaccine Discussions at Health Supervision Visits

Just remember, when you have these talks, to:

  • Use vaccination-focused motivational interviewing techniques for vaccine-hesitant parents.
  • Avoid using scientific and medical jargon.
  • Help parents who may have a skewed perception of the risks of vaccines vs risks of vaccine preventable diseases, by emphasizing that vaccines are very safe.
  • Avoid simply minimizing or dismissing a parent’s concerns about vaccines without providing a fact based explanation for why they shouldn’t be worried.
  • Highlight the benefits of vaccines, including all of the social benefits.
  • Avoid a “data dump,” in which you might overwhelm a vaccine hesitant parent with too much information all at once and in what they might see as a lecture about accepting vaccines.
  • Always use presumptive language and high-quality recommendations when you talk about vaccines.
  • Include stories and anecdotes about kids who have gotten sick and parents who regret not vaccinating their kids.
  • Become familiar with the anti-vaccine talking points that may be scaring your patients away from getting vaccinated on time. Why is this important? If they are concerned about glyphosate, you might not sound too convincing telling them not to worry if you don’t even know what glyphosate is.
  • Try the CASE Method for talking about vaccine concerns.

Are your kids fully vaccinated? Talk about that too.

There is much more to all of this than simply letting parents follow non-standard, parent-selected, delayed protection vaccine schedules and arguing with them about getting caught up.

What to Know About Talking to Vaccine Hesitant Parents

Learning new ways to talk to vaccine hesitant parents, including the use of vaccination-focused motivational interviewing techniques, presumptive language, and high-quality recommendations, might help pediatricians have more success and get less frustrated.

More About Talking to Vaccine Hesitant Parents

Best Vaccine Websites

Need to do your research and get educated about vaccines?

There are plenty of great vaccine books to turn to.

Best Vaccine Websites

Rather use the Internet?

Caveant lector et viewor — Let the reader and viewer beware.

Silberg et al, on Assessing, controlling, and assuring the quality of medical information on the Internet

Unfortunately, you can’t just trust any website that pops up at the top of your search results on Google, Bing, or Yahoo or that is shared by a friend on Facebook. Some of these sites might push misinformation about vaccines and be filled with anti-vaccine talking points.

Whether you are on the fence or just have a few questions, instead of feeling lucky that Google will lead you to trusted information, start your research about vaccines on the following websites. They are the most reliable and trusted sources of immunization information you will find.

  1. American Academy of Pediatrics
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  3. World Health Organization
  4. Every Child By Two
  5. EZIZ
  6. Families Fighting Flu
  7. Gavi The Vaccine Alliance
  8. Harpocrates Speaks
  9. History of Vaccines
  10. Immunise Australia
  11. Immunisation Scotland
  12. Immunization Action Coalition
  13. The Immunization Advisory Centre
  14. Immunize Canada
  15. Immunize for Good
  16. Institute for Vaccine Safety
  17. I Speak of Dreams
  18. Just the Vax
  19. Left Brain Right Brain
  20. Measles & Rubella Initiative
  21. Moms Who Vax
  22. National Foundation for Infectious Diseases
  23. National Meningitis Association
  24. NHS
  25. Northern Rivers Vaccination Supporters
  26. Nurses Who Vaccinate
  27. Parents of Kids with Infectious Diseases
  28. The Poxes Blog
  29. Pro-Vaccine Parenting Group (Facebook)
  30. Shot of Prevention
  31. Skeptical Raptor
  32. TIP Talk
  33. Vaccinate Your Family
  34. the Vaccine Blog
  35. Vaccine Education Center
  36. the Vaccine Mom
  37. the Vaccine Page (Facebook)
  38. Vaccines on the Fence (Facebook Group)
  39. Vaccines Work
  40. Voices for Vaccines

Other websites that are also reliable sources of immunization information, but don’t focus on vaccines include:

Get all of your questions answered yet?

Your pediatrician should also be a good resource for questions about vaccines.

Evaluating Vaccine Websites

Be skeptical if looking elsewhere.

Some general questions experts recommend asking, and which will certainly help when visiting a website about vaccines, include:

  • Who runs the Web site?
  • Who pays for the Web site?
  • What is the Web site’s purpose?
  • What is the original source of the Web site’s information?
  • How does the Web site document the evidence supporting its information?
  • Who reviewed the information before the owner posted it on the Web site?
  • How current is the information on the Web site?
  • How does the Web site owner choose links to other sites?

Fortunately, anti-vaccine websites are fairly easy to spot.

Anti-vaccine websites often filled with conspiracy theories, talk about BigPharma, and about how everyone else is hiding the truth about vaccines.
Anti-vaccine websites often filled with conspiracy theories, talk about BigPharma, and ideas about how everyone else is hiding the truth about vaccines.

They are often filled with vaccine injury stories and articles about how vaccines are filled with poison (they aren’t), don’t really work (they do), and aren’t even needed (they certainly are).

Tragically, their pseudo-scientific arguments can sometimes be persuasive, especially if you don’t understand that they are mostly the same old arguments that the anti-vaccine movement has been using for over 200 years to scare parents away from vaccinating and protecting their kids.

What to Know About the Best Vaccine Websites

With current information, a clear purpose (informing users, not selling supplements in an online store), and authors who are well-respected, our collection of the best vaccine websites can help you get educated about vaccines from a trusted source.

More on the Best Vaccine Websites

Six People Who Should Be Vaccinated

Even the staunchest anti-vaccine advocates, even if they want to believe that some vaccines are optional, must admit that there are some kids that really need to be vaccinated.

After all, there can’t be anyone so anti-vaccine that they wouldn’t allow their child to get the rabies vaccine after they were bitten by a rabid dog, right?

Optional Vaccines

Wait, some vaccines are optional?

“The main reason I feel that vaccines should be optional for parents is that every vaccine has the potential to cause a fatal reaction… And no government should be able to force parents into putting their child through something that puts that child at risk of dying. I think that’s just a fundamental right that every parent should have.”

Dr. Robert W. Sears on Why Partial Vaccinations May Be an Answer

Parents do sometimes ask about optional vaccines.

Which vaccines can they safely skip or delay?

That’s easy to answer.

Which disease do you want to risk your child getting?

Which disease, if more and more parents decided to make that vaccine optional, would you like to see come back?

“And if parents want to accept the disease risk because they don’t trust the vaccines, I think they have the right to make that choice.”

Dr. Robert W. Sears on Why Partial Vaccinations May Be an Answer

All vaccines are important and none are optional, despite what you might read on those so-called alternative immunization schedules that have been pushed by ‘vaccine friendly’ or disease friendly pediatricians for years.

Of course, parents do have the option of skipping one or more vaccines, even if the great majority of pediatricians advise against them doing so. That’s the fundamental flaw in Dr. Bob’s reasoning. The government, even with mandates to attend daycare and school, isn’t forcing parents to vaccinate their kids.

It’s not the only flaw though…

Essential Vaccine Situations

Do parents who delay or skip vaccines worry that their kids might get sick?

Some likely do, especially those who have been on the fence about vaccinating their kids.

For others, it is likely easier to be anti-vaccine when you think that you are hiding in the herd – you don’t get vaccinated and you don’t vaccinate your kids, and instead, you simply rely on the fact that everyone else around you is vaccinated to get protection from vaccine-preventable diseases.

That gamble doesn’t always work though.

“I think our Constitution guarantees parents the right to make health care decisions for their children, as long as they’re not putting their children’s life in danger. And by not vaccinating, you’re not putting your children’s life in immediate danger. Yes, you are taking some risk with diseases, but it’s not such a high risk where that should counteract or take away your freedoms as a parent to make your own health care decisions.”

Dr. Robert W. Sears on Why Partial Vaccinations May Be an Answer

So how high a risk are you taking by not vaccinating your kids?

It depends, but there are certainly special situations in which you would be putting your children’s life in more immediate danger if you didn’t get them vaccinated, including:

  1. a child bitten by a rabid dog, coyote, or bat – needs HBIG and a rabies vaccine series
  2. a completely unvaccinated teen who gets a deep puncture wound while playing in a field – needs TBIG and a tetanus vaccine (keep in mind that a child might still need a booster if they are up to date, but it has been more than five years since their last tetanus shot)
  3. an unvaccinated older teen living in a dorm on a college campus where there is an ongoing outbreak of meningococcemia – needs the meningococcal vaccine
  4. a preschooler with a cochlear implant – needs the pneumococcal vaccines because of an increased risk of pneumococcal meningitis
  5. an unvaccinated 1st grader who’s sibling is starting chemotherapy for leukemia – needs to get caught up on all age appropriate vaccines, including live vaccines
  6. unvaccinated kids traveling out of the country to parts of the world where vaccine-preventable diseases are still endemic – needs to get caught up on all age appropriate vaccines, but especially the MMR vaccine and likely needs more travel vaccines depending on the destination

What if a family member with chronic hepatitis B was going to be visiting or moving in with you? What if you had hepatitis B and you were having a baby? Would you get your baby vaccinated?

Polio Vaccine - don't wait until it's too late.
Who are you going to listen to?

Would you still skip or delay your child’s vaccines in any of these situations?

If you believe one or more anti-vaccine talking points or believe in any of the “experts” of the anti-vaccine movement, then you might.

Of course, none of the vaccines on the childhood immunization schedule are optional and delaying or skipping any of them increases your child’s risk of getting a vaccine-preventable disease.

The problem is that many vaccine hesitant parents greatly underestimate the risk of getting a disease and overestimate the risks of side effects from the vaccines.

And often, the immediate danger isn’t so obvious.

So instead of a dog who is obviously rabid, foaming at the mouth, what if your child was scratched by a stray cat that had never been vaccinated against rabies, or:

  • instead of a deep puncture wound, what if he just gets pricked by a thorn and gets tetanus?
  • instead of a possible exposure in an ongoing outbreak, what if your child is exposed before the outbreak of meningococcemia is widely known to be happening?
  • your unvaccinated child gets chicken pox and exposes a classmate who is immunosuppressed because they are being treated with chemotherapy?
  • your unvaccinated child gets measles after being exposed to an unvaccinated friend who had recently traveled to Europe, where there are many ongoing outbreaks?

The bottom line is that you can wait too long to get your child vaccinated and you may end up regretting your decision to skip or delay those vaccines. Partial vaccinations aren’t the answer.

The answer is to get educated about vaccines and to understand that vaccines are safe and necessary and that vaccines work.

What To Know About Kids Who Should Be Vaccinated

Whether you are anti-vaccine, on the fence, or a vaccine advocate, you should understand that there are some high risk situations in which kids can be in immediate danger if they weren’t vaccinated. And many other situations in which you may regret skipping or delaying your child’s vaccines.

More About Kids Who Should Be Vaccinated

Don’t Skip Your Baby’s Hepatitis B Shot

Hepatitis B has infected at least 2 billion people in the world, chronically infects more than 350 million people, and kills more than 600,000 people each year.

Fortunately, hepatitis B is now a vaccine-preventable disease.

“Since 1982, a hepatitis B vaccine has been available to prevent hepatitis B virus infection. Today, the vaccine is made using recombinant DNA technology and contains only a portion of the outer protein coat of the virus, called the hepatitis B surface antigen. The vaccine is a very safe and effective immunization against a viral infection that can lead to liver inflammation, cirrhosis and liver cancer. ”

PKIDs on The Importance of the Hepatitis B Vaccine

Although the first hepatitis B vaccines were developed in the early 1980s, it wasn’t until 1991 that it was added to the immunization schedule for all newborns and infants.

This universal program proved to be much more effective than the previous selective program that only vaccinated newborns if they were in certain high risk groups. In fact, acute hepatitis B infections in children and teens have decreased 96 percent since then.

Why Do Babies Still Get Hepatitis B?

Tragically, even with routine use of the hepatitis B vaccine, some babies still get hepatitis B infections.

Why?

Hepatitis B can be prevented.No, it is not because infants and young children are participating in high risk behaviors, like tattooing, body piercing, or IV drug use.

It can happen if a mother has hepatitis B, but doesn’t know it or isn’t managed properly, and her baby misses the preventative doses of HBIG (within 12 hours of birth) and/or first dose of the hepatitis B shot. Or a baby who was exposed to hepatitis B might not complete the three dose hepatitis B vaccine series.

Newborns of mothers with hepatitis B who are highly viremic (they have very high levels of the virus in their blood), which can be detected during viral load testing during the third trimester, might also develop hepatitis B even though they got the proper dosages of HBIG and the hepatitis B vaccine, if they weren’t treated with an oral anti-hepatitis B virus drug, such as lamivudine, telbivudine and tenofovir.

Declining the Birth Dose of the Hepatitis B Shot

If the hepatitis B vaccine is safe and effective and can prevent cancer, why do some parents decline their newborn’s birth dose of this shot?

“Over one third of all people who are infected each year with hep B are in the “no risk” category for infection. I’m one of them, and even a year later, I’m trying to put my horrible experience behind me. No one should ever have to suffer through being infected with this virus — it is totally preventable with a series of three shots. “No risk” living is a meaningless term. If you go to dentist, borrow a toothbrush, get your ears pierced, get a manicure, or engage in countless other mundane activities, you could become infected.”

I Was At No Risk for Ever Having Hepatitis B!

These parents who decline the birth dose of the hepatitis B vaccine are likely influenced by the misinformation that surrounds much of the anti-vaccine movement, including being made to believe that:

  • they don’t need it because you can be tested for hepatitis B – but when relying on testing, some newborns who needed preventative treatment with HBIG and the hepatitis vaccine get missed and are at risk for developing hepatitis B.
  • it is just an STD vaccine, so they don’t need it because only people who use IV drugs or have promiscuous sex are at risk – except that there are plenty of stories of children and adults getting hepatitis B who weren’t at high risk or didn’t know they were at high risk. And although you won’t get hepatitis B through casual contact, there are cases of people getting infected after sharing a toothbrush or razor, and even after getting bitten. Why would your child share a toothbrush with someone that has hepatitis B? They likely wouldn’t, except that many people with chronic hepatitis B who are contagious don’t have any symptoms, so they might not know to be extra careful.
  • it doesn’t work – the hepatitis B works very well and provides long term protection
  • it is dangerous and can cause autism, multiple sclerosis, and SIDS, etc. – the hepatitis B vaccine doesn’t include any toxic ingredients, has been used since 1982, and has been shown to be safe
  • they don’t need it because hepatitis B is not a serious disease – while many adults with hepatitis B can have asymptomatic infections and completely recover, thousands die each year with acute and chronic hepatitis B. Also, younger children have a very high risk of developing chronic hepatitis B infections, which can lead to chronic liver disease, even cancer. Hepatitis B is a very serious disease.

Of course, these are the typical anti-vaccine talking points they use to help them overstate the risks of a vaccine, while downplaying the risks of a natural infection, to scare you away from vaccinating and protecting your children.

Don’t Skip Your Baby’s Hepatitis B Shot

The hepatitis B vaccine is a safe and effective way to protect your baby from this potentially life-threatening disease and there is no good reason to skip it. Just like there is no good reason to skip your baby’s vitamin K shot.

In the United States alone, more than 2 million people are chronically infected with hepatitis B, and each year, up to 40,000 become newly infected and thousands die.

“So what I did on my schedule is, I took a more logical look at hepatitis B, and I realized that babies have no risk of catching this disease, so let’s not do the hep B vaccine while a baby’s young and small and more vulnerable.”

Dr. Bob Sears

It’s not logical to encourage parents to delay a vaccine, tell them there is no risk in delaying the vaccine, and not mention any of the potential risks, especially that kids can sometimes get hepatitis B without engaging in high risk behaviors. From a needle-stick injury in the park to getting bit at daycare by an asymptomatic child whose parents don’t even know that they have hepatitis B, you can’t say that there is no risk.

Of the 40,000 newly infected people with hepatitis B each year, there are thought to be up to 950 infants who develop chronic hepatitis B from an untreated perinatal hepatitis B virus exposure. Even if it is more rare than that, skipping or delaying the birth dose of hepatitis B vaccine is an unnecessary risk.

The AAP, CDC, and ACIP all recommend that newborns should get their first dose of hepatitis B vaccine within 24 hours of birth.

What to Know Your Baby’s Hepatitis B Shots

The hepatitis B vaccine is a safe and effective way to protect your baby from hepatitis B, a potentially life-threatening disease, and there is no good reason to skip their birth dose.

More About Your Baby’s Hepatitis B Shots

National Immunization Awareness Month

This year, we celebrate the 17th annual National Immunization Awareness Month.

History of National Immunization Awareness Month

The National Partnership for Immunization first designated August as National Immunization Awareness Month in 2001.

“NIAM was officially announced to the media and the immunization community with a kickoff event at the National Press Club on August 1, 2001. Key stakeholders, including maternal and child health professionals, immunization advocates and policymakers participated in a press conference and reception in Washington, D.C. to celebrate the initiation of this yearly event.”

Are you up-to-date? Vaccinate! An early theme of National Immunization Awareness Month.
Are you up-to-date? Vaccinate! An early theme of National Immunization Awareness Month.

In addition to giving awards to a few members of Congress, the TV show ER got a media award at the first National Immunization Awareness Month because the show “portrayed the importance of vaccinations using the story of an unvaccinated child who was sent to the emergency room and subsequently died from measles. The episode effectively relayed the important messages that measles still occurs in this country, that the disease can be deadly and that it can be prevented by immunization.”

In 2006, the CDC “took over” National Immunization Awareness Month, continuing NPI’s campaign focused around the theme, “Are You Up to Date? Vaccinate!”

Unfortunately, the CDC didn’t really sponsor the month. They just recognized that it was happening on their website…

“While CDC does not sponsor this month, CDC does support and encourage the efforts of state and local health departments and other immunization partners to celebrate NIAM and use this month to promote back to school immunizations, remind college students to catch up immunizations before they move into dormitories, and remind everyone that the influenza season is only a few months away. It’s a great reminder to our nation that people of all ages require timely immunization to protect their health.”

It wasn’t until 2013 that National Immunization Awareness Month really came back.

That’s when the National Public Health Information Coalition started coordinating NIAM activities, including key messages, sample media materials, social media content, and event ideas to:

  • Encourage parents of young children to get recommended immunizations by age two
  • Help parents make sure older children, preteens, and teens have received all recommended vaccines by the time they go back to school
  • Remind college students to catch up on immunizations before they move into dormitories
  • Educate adults, including healthcare workers, about vaccines and boosters they may need
  • Educate pregnant women about getting vaccinated to protect newborns from diseases like whooping cough (pertussis)
  • Remind everyone that the next flu season is only a few months away

In 2014, NIAM began to also focus on a different stage of the lifespan each week, from infants, children and teens to pregnant women and adults.

National Immunization Awareness Month 2017

What’s going on in #NIAM17?

In addition to adding a ‘Back to School’ category for school age children that lasts throughout the month to make sure kids are ready for school, NAIM17 continues with different themes each week:

  • Vaccines are safe. Vaccines are necessary. Vaccines work. These are good messages to learn in NIAM17.
    Vaccines are safe. Vaccines are necessary. Vaccines work. These are good messages to learn in NIAM17.

    Babies and Young Children: A healthy start begins with on-time vaccinations. (July 31-August 6)

  • Pregnant Women: Protect yourself and pass protection on to your baby. (August 7-13)
  • Adults: Vaccines are not just for kids. (August 14-20)
  • Preteens/Teens: Ensure a healthy future with vaccines. (August 21-27)

Are your kids up-to-date?

National Immunization Awareness Month is a great time to get educated about vaccines and learn that:

  • Vaccines protect against serious diseases.
  • These diseases still exist and outbreaks do occur.
  • Vaccines are recommended throughout our lives.
  • Vaccines are very safe.

It’s also a good time to learn how to avoid getting scared by anti-vaccine talking points and the misinformation pushed by the anti-vaccine movement.

What To Know About National Immunization Awareness Month

National Immunization Awareness Month is a great time to learn why vaccinating and protecting your family is an important and safe decision.

More About National Immunization Awareness Month

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Best Books to Help You Research Vaccines

There are many books to help you get educated about vaccines and avoid getting influenced by vaccine scare stories and anti-vaccine talking points.

Some can even help you understand why you are afraid of vaccines.

Unfortunately, if you simply search Amazon for books about vaccines, you are going to be hit with a list of anti-vaccine books. These are books that push their own made-up, so-called alternative immunization schedules and misinformation about vaccines to scare you away from vaccinating and protecting your kids.

Best Vaccine Books

Which books about vaccines have you read?

Did you even realize you had so many choices?

These books about vaccines can help with your research about vaccinating and protecting your family.
These books about vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases can help with your research about vaccinating and protecting your family.

Some of my favorite vaccine books that can help you with your research on vaccination and making the right decision for your child include:

  • Autism’s False Prophets. Bad Science, Risky Medicine, and the Search for a Cure
  • Bad Faith: When Religious Belief Undermines Modern Medicine
  • Bad Science: Quacks, Hacks, and Big Pharma Flacks
  • Calling the Shots: Why Parents Reject Vaccines
  • The Cutter Incident: How America’s First Polio Vaccine Led to the Growing Vaccine Crisis
  • Dangerous Pregnancies: Mothers, Disabilities, and Abortion in Modern America
  • Deadly Choices. How the Anti-Vaccine Movement Threatens Us All
  • Do Vaccines Cause That?!
  • Do You Believe in Magic? The Sense and Nonsense of Alternative Medicine
  • Immunity by William E. Paul, MD
  • On Immunity: An Inoculation
  • NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity
  • The Panic Virus: A True Story of Medicine, Science, and Fear
  • Panicology: Two Statisticians Explain What’s Worth Worrying About (and What’s Not)
  • Polio. An American Story
  • Polio Wars: Sister Kenny and the Golden Age of American Medicine
  • Pox. An American History
  • Smallpox and the Literary Imagination, 1660-1820
  • Tabloid Medicine: How the Internet is Being Used to Hijack Medical Science for Fear and Profit
  • Twin Voices: A Memoir of Polio, the Forgotten Killer
  • Vaccinated. One Man’s Quest to Defeat the World’s Deadliest Diseases
  • Vaccination: A History from Lady Montagu to Genetic Engineering
  • Vaccine. The Controversial Story of Medicine’s Greatest Lifesaver
  • The Vaccine Race: Science, Politics, and the Human Costs of Defeating Disease
  • Vaccines and Your Child. Separating Fact from Fiction
  • Your Baby’s Best Shot. Why Vaccines Are Safe and Save Lives

How many of these books about vaccines have you read?

What To Know About Vaccine Books

If you were scared away from vaccinating your kids because of a book you read or something you saw on the Internet, consider reading a few of these vaccine books that are based on evidence, not fear.

More Information on Vaccine Books:

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