Tag: recommendations

50 Ways to Get Educated About Vaccines

A Board of Health quarantine poster warning that the premises are contaminated by smallpox.
Have you ever seen a quarantine sign for smallpox on someone’s home? That’s because Vaccines Work!

Have questions about vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases?

Think you have done enough research already?

If that research has you asking for package inserts and requesting low aluminum vaccines, then you might need to rethink how you have been doing your research.

Get Educated About Vaccines

Vaccines are safe, effective, and necessary.

They aren’t full of toxins.

They have been tested together.

Pediatricians do know a lot about vaccines. What they may not know is how to counter every anti-vaccine argument that you might have heard of, read about, or with which one of your family members is scaring you.

“Pediatricians who routinely recommend limiting the numbers of vaccines administered at a single visit such that vaccines are administered late are providing care that deviates from the standard evidence-based schedule recommended by these bodies.”

American Academy of Pediatrics

You can rest assured that these arguments have all been debunked, often many years ago, but they keep coming up, over and over again. In fact, today’s anti-vaccine movement uses many of the same themes as folks used when the first vaccines were introduced over one hundred years ago.

50 Ways To Get Educated About Vaccines

So before deciding to skip or delay any of your child’s vaccines, do some real research about vaccines and vaccine-preventable diseases and:

  1. Understand the Pseudoscience Behind the Anti-Vaccine Movement
  2. Review the contraindications to vaccines and even more common, the things commonly misperceived as contraindications
  3. Examine the evidence for the safety of vaccines
  4. Get answers to the 9 Questions For The Pro-Vaxers
  5. Know that Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism
  6. Read about these Five Things I’ve Learned About Vaccines Through 21 Years of Parenting
  7. Learn the Tactics and Tropes of the Anti-vaccine Movement
  8. Know that kids do not get too many vaccines too soon and that vaccines don’t overwhelm your child’s immune system
  9. Understand these Vaccine Safety Basics
  10. Don’t listen to these anti-vaccine celebrities
  11. Get the details of Andrew Wakefield’s fraud
  12. Study why those Graphs That Show Vaccines Don’t Work are just propaganda
  13. Know that you can’t hide your kids in the herd to avoid disease
  14. Read why “Spacing Out” Vaccines Doesn’t Make Them Safer
  15. Wonder why parents misuse religious exemptions to excuse kids from vaccines
  16. See the evidence that Flu Shots Work for Kids Under Two
  17. Review these questions and answers on immunization and vaccine safety
  18. Learn Why My Child With Autism Is Fully Vaccinated
  19. Know that You Can Be the Pro-Life Parent of a Fully Vaccinated Child
  20. See how Having a baby doesn’t change the facts on vaccines
  21. Question Vaccine Injury Stories: the Sacred Cows of the Internet
  22. Read An Open Letter to Expecting Parents and Parents Yet-To-Be about Vaccinating
  23. Know that there is No Clear Evidence that Vaccines Cause Autism
  24. Learn from those who have Left the Anti-Vaccine Movement
  25. Understand why you’re wrong if you think the flu vax gives you the flu
  26. Avoid Cashing In On Fear: The Danger of Dr. Sears
  27. Realize that Almost All Religions Support Immunizations
  28. Learn which vaccines are the most important to get
  29. See that Unvaccinated Children Can Have Autism Too
  30. View Personal Stories of Families Affected by Vaccine-Preventable Diseases
  31. Know who is at risk if you don’t vaccinate your kids
  32. Read about the most common Misconceptions about Vaccines
  33. Review the Benefits vs. Risks of getting vaccinated
  34. Learn about the Ingredients in Vaccines
  35. Realize that vaccines are carefully monitored for safety, even after they have been approved, and it isn’t just by folks reporting side effects to VAERS
  36. Know that those 124 Research Papers Supporting the Vaccine/Autism Link Really Don’t
  37. Understand what Vaccine Package Inserts really do and don’t tell you
  38. See why the CDC Whistleblower really has no whistle to blow
  39. Know that the Vaccine Court did not say that vaccines cause autism
  40. What to consider if Deciding whether to alter the immunization schedule
  41. Learn why Shedding from Vaccines isn’t a danger to your kids
  42. Review even more Misconceptions about Immunizations
  43. Understand The Science Behind Vaccine Research and Testing
  44. Know that your Unvaccinated Child isn’t going to be Healthier than Vaccinated Kids
  45. Realize just how important the HPV vaccine really is
  46. Learn How to Respond to Inaccurate Posts about Vaccines on Social Media
  47. Know that vaccines are studied in pregnant women
  48. See the real dangers in following Jenny McCarthy’s advice
  49. Know that VAERS reports are often misused and understand that parents can report suspected adverse events to VAERS themselves
  50. Fill out a screening questionnaire for contraindications to vaccines

Still have questions? Read one or more of these Vaccine Books

And talk to your doctor about your concerns about vaccines.

Get Educated. Get Vaccinated.

More Ways To Get Educated About Vaccines

These websites and blogs will also help you get educated about vaccines and research any addition questions you might have:

5 Myths About Tetanus and Tetanus Shots

Think you know everything you need to know about tetanus and tetanus shots to make an informed decision about getting vaccinated?

Unfortunately, there is a lot of misinformation out there about tetanus that can scare you away from getting a tetanus shot or make you think that you don’t really need one.

You can only get tetanus from a rusty nail. (False)

Would a rose smell as sweet if you pricked your finger on a thorn and got tetanus?
Would a rose smell as sweet if you pricked your finger on a thorn and got tetanus? Photo by Cherrie Mio Rhodes. (CC BY 2.0)

Tetanus is caused by the Clostridium tetani bacteria.

Unlike most other vaccine-preventive diseases, tetanus is not contagious. Instead, you can get tetanus after being exposed to tetanus spores in dust, soil, and feces, which then grow and make a powerful neurotoxin. Tetanus spores can even be found in the mouth of many animals.

So why does everyone associate tetanus with rusty nails?

We likely think that an old, rusty nail  is more likely to be contaminated with tetanus spores simply because it has been outside for a long time. Especially as compared to a brand new one that you just took out of a box.

But tetanus is not just about nails.

You can get tetanus after a cat or dog bite, a burn, frostbite, a tractor falling on your leg (crush injury), or falling into a rose bush (puncture wounds from thorns), etc. Almost anything that can cause a non-superficial wound can cause tetanus, especially if the wound is contaminated with dirt, feces, or saliva.

A tetanus shot won’t help after you have already been cut, stabbed, or bitten. (False)

The reason we give the shot is because the tetanus spores take time to germinate.

We are not worried about tetanus bacteria on a rusty nail, cat teeth, rose bush, or on ones very dirty hands through which a clean knife went through.

It’s the tetanus spores on those things and everywhere else, because they are in dirt and dust. And then, after the spores germinate inside a wound, the C. tetani bacteria have to start producing the exotoxin that acts as a neurotoxin, which causes the symptoms of tetanus.

The tetanus vaccine is against this exotoxin.

Unfortunately, it only takes a very small amount of tetanus toxin to cause tetanus. That’s why you don’t get natural immunity after being exposed to tetanus, but you do after getting the vaccine. It would only take about 60 nanograms of tetanus toxin to kill a small child.

Once the spores germinate, start producing exotoxin, and the exotoxin finally reaches your nervous system, that’s when you will start having tetanus symptoms.

If a puncture wound bleeds a lot, then you don’t need to get a tetanus shot. (False)

Many puncture wounds do not bleed a lot, but those that do are still at risk for tetanus.
Many puncture wounds do not bleed a lot, but those that do are still at risk for tetanus. Photo by James Heilman, MD

You don’t need to get a tetanus shot if you have a clean, minor wound and:

  • you have completed a primary tetanus series (a minimum of 3 tetanus containing vaccines), and
  • your most recent dose of tetanus vaccine was within the past 10 years

For most other wounds, including dirty wounds, animal bites, and puncture wounds, etc., you likely don’t need a tetanus shot if you have completed a primary tetanus series, and your most recent dose of tetanus vaccine was within the past 5 years.

In addition to a dose of tetanus vaccine, if has been less than 5 years since their last dose or they are unvaccinated or incompletely vaccinated, then they might also need to get tetanus immune globulin (TIG).

How much the wound bleeds has nothing to do with whether or not you need a tetanus shot. After all, a bleeding wound is not going to flush out all of the tetanus spores that might have contaminated your wound, or at least you have no guarantee that it did. What if the bleeding was more superficial and there was a deeper puncture wound that you couldn’t see?

This idea likely comes from the fact that tetanus is an anaerobic bacteria, meaning that it can’t survive around oxygen.

Tetanus is a mild disease. (False)

Tetanus, which people commonly think of as “lockjaw” is hardly a mild disease.

According to the CDC, “Even with modern intensive care, generalized tetanus is associated with death rates of 10% to 20%.”

And tetanus will always be a problem – if you aren’t vaccinated.

Since tetanus isn’t contagious and the tetanus spores are in the dirt and dust around us, you can’t rely on the folks around you to get vaccinated and “hide in the herd” for this vaccine-preventable disease.

Some recent cases highlight this myth:

  • an unvaccinated 7-year-old in Australia who contracted tetanus through an open wound in her foot while playing in her family’s garden. She was in critical condition, remained in the ICU for a few weeks despite quick treatment, and will likely face months, if not years of rehab after being released. (2017)
  • an unvaccinated women who developed obstetric tetanus
  • an unvaccinated 6-year-old in Canada who developed tetanus symptoms 10 days after stepping on a nail (2015)
  • unvaccinated children in parts of the world where vaccines are not longer available, like Ukraine
  • an unvaccinated 7-year-old in New Zealand who developed tetanus after cutting his foot and was hospitalized for almost a month (2013)

Worldwide, there are still about 49,000 deaths a year from neonatal tetanus and 14,500 deaths in children and adults. The incidence of tetanus has dropped tremendously since 1980 though, as more and more people get vaccinated throughout the world.

There are easy, non-toxic ways to prevent tetanus.

This one is actually true, it’s called a tetanus vaccine.

It replaced the previous treatment for tetanus, giving folks tetanus antitoxin, a treatment which began in the late 19th century. The first tetanus vaccine followed soon after, in the early 1920’s. It became more widely used during World War II.

“I myself suffered a fairly severe and deep cut on my ankle from a freak accident a few years ago but the thought of getting a tetanus shot for the injury never even crossed my mind.  I simply soaked my foot and ankle in warm salt water a couple of times a day for about a week to ensure that it stayed clean and contamination free.

The injury healed up nicely and I never exposed myself to the toxins and lingering health problems that can and do result from a tetanus shot.”

The Healthy Home Economist

Of course, when anti-vaccine folks talk about ‘non-toxic’ ways, they mean holistic type treatments without vaccines or other standard medical treatments.

When they tell you to clean the wound and take “extra cod liver oil, natural vitamin C, lacto-fermented foods and plenty of bone broths,” they are basically saying to hope that you are lucky and you don’t get tetanus.

Not only is the tetanus vaccine not toxic, but it helps fight the toxin that tetanus bacteria could produce in a contaminated wound.

What about hydrogen peroxide or colloidal silver? Like simple cleaning, with a deep puncture wound, none of those things will likely get to the ‘bottom’ of the wound. If you have even seen a puncture wound, like when a child steps on a nail, there is not much to clean. The wound typically closes up as the nail or other object exits the skin. Even with other wounds, unless you surgically open and irrigate the wound, you likely won’t clean it well enough to get all of the spores out if they are there.

What to Know About Tetanus and Tetanus Shots

Keeping up-to-date on your tetanus vaccines, which might mean an early shot if you have a dirty wound, is the only way to avoid serious and potentially life-threatening tetanus infections.

More About Tetanus and Tetanus Shots

How Long Does Immunity from Vaccines Last?

Most vaccines provide long lasting protection.
Most vaccines provide long-lasting protection. Photo courtesy of Judy Schmidt and James Gathany.

One of the benefits of natural immunity is that after you get sick with a disease, you get life long immunity.

At least usually.

It is often a surprise to some people that some diseases don’t give life long immunity, most notably pertussis infections and tetanus, which typically doesn’t give any natural immunity at all.

How Long Does Immunity from Vaccines Last?

What about vaccines?

Do you get life long immunity after vaccines?

If you know about the issues of waning immunity with some vaccines, then you already know the answer. And even if you didn’t know that immunity from the mumps and pertussis vaccines can wear off, then you likely do know that you need a tetanus booster every 10 years, so that vaccine doesn’t give life long immunity.

How long is the protection from other vaccines?

  • the measles vaccine provides protection for at least 35 years
  • the hepatitis B vaccine provides protection for at least 20 years
  • the hepatitis A vaccine provides protection for at least 14 years
  • the chicken pox vaccine provides protection for at least 20 years
  • both the oral and inactivated polio vaccines provide long lasting protection
  • the rubella vaccine provides protection for at least 21 years
  • Gardasil provides protection for at least 8 years
  • the Hib vaccine provides protection for at least 9 years
  • like tetanus, the diphtheria vaccine provides protection for at about 10 years
  • the pneumococcal vaccine (Prevnar) provides protection for at least 5 years

Why do we say “at least” in so many cases?

In general, that’s how long these vaccines have been around. As time goes by, we will hopefully find that they last much longer.

What To Know About the Duration of Protection from Vaccines

Although some vaccines require boosters, most vaccines provide long-lasting protection.

More Information About Duration of Protection from Vaccines

About Those Measles Outbreaks in China

The MMR vaccine is one of the most effective vaccines ever made. Two doses are at least 99% effective at preventing measles infections. Even one dose is about 95% effective against measles.

We have measles outbreaks in the United States not because the MMR vaccine is not effective, but rather because there are still so many unvaccinated people around. Often, these unvaccinated people travel out of the country, get sick with measles, and start the outbreaks.

About Those Measles Outbreaks in China

A study in PLOS did not find massive outbreaks of measles in China despite high vaccination rates.
A study in PLOS did not find massive outbreaks of measles in China despite high vaccination rates.

But if the MMR vaccine is so effective, then why, as many anti-vaccine folks claim, is China having measles outbreaks when 99% are vaccinated?

The simple answer is that this claim is false – China is not having these big measles outbreaks among highly vaccinated people.

The source of the claim is from a real article in PLoS One, “Difficulties in Eliminating Measles and Controlling Rubella and Mumps: A Cross-Sectional Study of a First Measles and Rubella Vaccination and a Second Measles, Mumps, and Rubella Vaccination,” which found that in 2011, in Zhejiang province, there were:

  • 9 patients with measles, including 3 infants who were too young to be vaccinated and 6 young adults who were unsure if they had ever been vaccinated
  • 1122 patients with mumps
  • 186 patients with rubella

So no big measles outbreaks, but why the large number of cases of mumps and rubella?

History of Measles Vaccination in China

It becomes easy to understand when you look at their immunization schedule.

In the United States, the first live measles vaccine was introduced in 1963, the MMR was introduced in 1971, and a booster dose of MMR was added to the childhood immunization schedule in 1990. That helped to stop the endemic spread of measles in 2000 and rubella in 2004.

In contrast, the measles vaccine timeline has moved much slower in China:

  • a measles vaccine was introduced in 1966
  • continued use of a one-dose, single-antigen measles vaccine through the 1970s and mid-1980s
  • the addition of a single-antigen measles vaccine booster dose in 1985 to children who were 7-years-old
  • in 2007, the switch to a measles-rubella vaccine for 8 months old, with a MMR booster at 18-24 months
  • the addition of a measles-rubella vaccine booster for secondary school students in 2008
  • a campaign to get children between the ages of 8 months and 4 years vaccinated with a measles-mumps vaccine in 2010

So many of the children and young adults who had mumps and rubella would not have had a chance to get a mumps or rubella vaccine. They were too old when they started giving those vaccines and there was no catch-up for older children and adults.

The study authors conclude that a timely two-dose MMR vaccination schedule is recommended, with the first dose at 8 months and the second dose at 18–24 months. An MR vaccination speed-up campaign may be necessary for elder adolescents and young adults, particularly young females.

What To Know About Those Measles Outbreaks in China

Even considering the varied vaccine schedule, the study also clearly states that even for the measles vaccine, there is less than 95% coverage in almost all age groups and that measles cases are at an historic low.

It should be clear that anti-vaccine websites are putting out false information when they say that China is having measles outbreaks when 99% of the population is vaccinated.

More About Those Measles Outbreaks in China

Get a Vaccine Checkup Before Traveling with Your Kids

Get vaccinated. Measles is just a plane ride away.
Get vaccinated: Bring home fun souvenirs, photos, and fantastic memories, not measles!

Got plans to travel this spring or summer?

Going out of the country?

Taking the kids?

While a trip abroad can be a great experience for kids, whether you are just site seeing or you are visiting family, don’t forget to take some simple precautions so that your family comes back safe and healthy.

Get a Vaccine Checkup Before You Travel

It is important to remember that just because your kids are up-to-date on their routine childhood immunizations, that doesn’t mean that they are ready to travel out of the country.

It might surprise some folks to know that there are many vaccines that kids in the United States don’t routinely get, like vaccines that protect against cholera, yellow fever, typhoid, and Japanese encephalitis, etc. These are considered to be travel vaccines and may be recommended or required depending on where you are going.

How do you know which vaccines your kids need?

The CDC Traveler’s Health website is the best place to figure it out. With a list of 245 destinations, in addition to offering advice on how to avoid vaccine-preventable diseases, you get recommendations on avoiding others too, like Zika and malaria.

Don’t wait until the last minute before checking on these vaccine recommendations though. These are not vaccines that most pediatricians have in their office, so call or visit your pediatrician a few months in advance to plan out how you will get them. As a last resort, if your pediatrician can’t order them, can’t help you get them from an area pharmacy, and they aren’t available at your local health department, you might look to see if there is a “travel clinic” nearby.

Don’t Forget the Early MMR Recommendations

It’s also important to remember to make sure your child’s routine vaccines are up-to-date too. Confusing things a little, that can mean getting their MMR vaccines early.

Many parents, and some pediatricians,  often forget that before traveling out of the United States:

  • Infants 6 months through 11 months of age should receive one dose of MMR vaccine. While this early dose should provide protection while traveling, it doesn’t provide full protection, doesn’t count as the 12 to 15 month routine dose, and will need to be repeated.
  • Children 12 months of age and older should receive two doses of MMR vaccine separated by at least 28 days. So even if your child is less than 4-years, he or she needs two doses of MMR before traveling out of the country. This second early dose won’t have to be repeated when they do turn 4.
  • Teenagers and adults who do not have evidence of immunity against measles should get two doses of MMR vaccine separated by at least 28 days. While some adults are considered fully vaccinated with one dose of MMR, that isn’t true if they are traveling out of the country. Travelers need two doses!

Continuing outbreaks of measles linked to unvaccinated and partially vaccinated travelers highlight the need to spread the word about these recommendations.

Traveling is fun. Be sure to bring back some great memories and a few souvenirs. Don’t bring home measles or other diseases that you can then spread to others in your community or on the plane ride home.

Save

Pediatricians as Vaccine Pushers

We often here that pediatricians are vaccine pushers, at least from anti-vaccine folks…

If that is the case though, how come pediatricians don’t routinely push any of the following vaccines on kids:

  1. Adenovirus vaccine – only given to enlisted soldiers during basic training
  2. Anthrax vaccine – high risk people only
  3. BCG vaccine vaccine – high risk people only
  4. Cholera vaccine – recently approved in the United States as a travel vaccine
  5. Hepatitis E – not available in the United States
  6. Japanese encephalitis vaccine – a travel vaccine
  7. Meningococcal C vaccine (MenC) – not available in the United States
  8. Meningococcal B vaccine (MenB) –  has a “permissive” recommendation in that parents are told they can get it if they want their kids to avoid MenB infections, but it is not required yet.
  9. MenHibrix – a combination between Hib and Meningococcal Groups C and Y, but it is only given to high risk kids
  10. Plague vaccine – discontinued
  11. Rabies vaccine – high risk people only
  12. Shingles vaccine – seniors only
  13. Smallpox vaccine – high risk people only
  14. Tick-borne encephalitis – not available in the United States
  15. Typhoid fever vaccine – a travel vaccine
  16. Typhus vaccine – discontinued
  17. Yellow fever vaccine – a travel vaccine
The oral adenovirus vaccine is approved to prevent adenovirus infections in military populations.
The oral adenovirus vaccine is approved to prevent adenovirus infections in military populations.

Sure, it would be hard to push a vaccine that has been discontinued or not even available in the United States, but if your goal was to aggressively push vaccines, how hard would it be to get Big Pharma to start making them available?

That would more than double the number of vaccines that kids would have to get.

Those Times “Vaccine Pushers” Said No To Vaccines

And how come some of the biggest vaccine advocates have been against plans for mass immunizations if they are vaccine pushers?

In addition to Dr. Albert Sabin advising against President Gerald Ford’s plans for universal vaccination against swine flu in 1976, Dr. Paul Offit missed the chance to push the small pox vaccine on us in 2002. He instead advised for a different plan:

Here’s another way to do it. We can make the vaccine. Make sure we understand who’s going to get it, who’s going to be giving it. Then wait, wait for there to be one case of documented smallpox somewhere on the face of this earth and then we can move into vaccinating people, large numbers of people.

Dr. Paul Offit

Dr. Offit, who is routinely called a shameless vaccine pusher by anti-vaccine websites, was the sole member of a CDC vaccine advisory committee to vote against President George Bush’s 2002 plan to vaccinate about 500,000 health care workers against smallpox. He feared that the risks might outweigh the benefits.

For More Information on Vaccine Pushers

Save

Catch-Up Immunization Schedules

It is surprisingly easy to get behind on your child’s immunizations, even if you are trying to stay on schedule.

How do you miss a shot?

Your child could have been sick when they were supposed to get their vaccines, your pediatrician might have been out of one or more vaccines, or you might have simply missed one of your child’s well checkups.

Catching Up On Vaccines

A catch-up immunization schedule
A catch-up vaccination schedule program can help you figure out when to get the vaccines your child has missed.

If your child gets behind and misses one or more vaccines, be sure to get caught up as soon as possible.

If your child needs to get caught up quickly, like to start daycare or school, to travel out of the country, or because of a disease outbreak in your area, you can even use an accelerated immunization schedule, using minimum intervals between doses.

Depending on your child’s age, you might even be able to skip a few doses or vaccines.

For example, with rotavirus vaccines, vaccination should not be started if an infant is already 15 weeks old and the final dose must be given by 8 months of age.

And if your child gets their first dose of Hib after they are 15 months old, they don’t need any more doses. And they wouldn’t need any doses at all if they are already 5 years old.

Prevnar, IPV, and DTaP might also need to given on an alternative schedule when given on a catch-up schedule.

Specifically, your child might be able to skip:

  • the fifth dose of the DTaP vaccine, if the fourth dose was given at age 4 years or older.
  • the fourth dose of the IPV vaccine, if the third dose was given at age 4 years or older.
  • one or more doses of Prevnar, depending on when the other doses were given

Is this a good way to get out of getting some doses or vaccines?

Of course not. In addition to missing out on those vaccines, your child is missing out on the protection from those vaccines.

For More Information on Catch-Up Immunization Schedules