Tag: flu shot myths

Do Flu Vaccines Cause RSV?

Why do some people think that getting a flu vaccine can cause them to get RSV?

Flu vaccines do not cause RSV.
Flu vaccines do not cause RSV.

The usual suspects…

Do Flu Vaccines Cause RSV?

Like the flu, RSV or respiratory syncytial virus, causes infections during cold and flu season.

Unlike the flu, we don’t yet have an RSV vaccine, but that hasn’t stopped anti-vax folks from trying to link them together.

Of course it is silly think that a flu shot could cause a child to develop RSV.

For one thing, you can just look at who gets RSV, especially severe RSV infections.

“The average seasonal RSV hospitalization rate in this study was 5.2 per 1000 children who were <24 months old, but the rate varied by season as much as fourfold. Nevertheless, 1-month-old infants consistently were most likely to be hospitalized, almost twice as often as the next 2 most at-risk groups: infants <1 month old and infants 2 months old. These youngest infants accounted for an important proportion of all children admitted with RSV infection in the first 2 years of life: 11% were infants <1 month old, 44% were ≤2 months old, and only 36% were >5 months old.”

Hall et al on Respiratory syncytial virus-associated hospitalizations among children less than 24 months of age

While anyone can get RSV, even adults, it is infants who are under 6 months old that typically are at the greatest risk to have severe infections. And of course, these kids are too young to even have a flu vaccine!

The other reason?

It is no surprise that the flu vaccine delays of 2015 didn’t affect RSV season…

RSV season not only starts before flu season, but often before the time when we are even giving flu vaccines!

Anyway, the whole idea that “RSV is an adverse reaction from flu vaccine” comes from the misuse of a study, Increased risk of noninfluenza respiratory virus infections associated with receipt of inactivated influenza vaccine, that doesn’t even mention RSV.

“Being protected against influenza, TIV recipients may lack temporary non-specific immunity that protected against other respiratory viruses.”

Cowling et al on Increased risk of noninfluenza respiratory virus infections associated with receipt of inactivated influenza vaccine

And it is very important to keep in mind that it was a small study about interference caused by non-specific immunity.

Another larger study that did include RSV, “Influenza vaccination is not associated with detection of noninfluenza respiratory viruses in seasonal studies of influenza vaccine effectiveness,” found that “influenza vaccination was not associated with detection of noninfluenza respiratory viruses.”

What to Know About Flu Vaccines Causing RSV

The bottom line is that flu vaccines do not cause RSV and do not increase your risk of getting RSV.

More on Flu Vaccine Side Effects

The 2019-20 Flu Season Update

Breaking News: The 2019-2020 season is well underway, but flu activity has “declined slightly.” (see below)

It is way too early to tell if flu season has peaked...
It is way too early to tell if flu season has peaked…

Flu season started early this year.

The 2019-20 Flu Season Update

That’s not the only surprise though. We are seeing a lot of flu B, which is also unusual for the beginning of flu season.

And we are already seeing quite a few pediatric deaths – 39 so far this season.

The overall cumulative hospitalization rate was 19.9 per 100,000 population which is similar to what has been seen during recent previous influenza seasons at this time of year.
The overall cumulative hospitalization rate was 19.9 per 100,000 population which is similar to what has been seen during recent previous influenza seasons at this time of year.

But none of this should really be a surprise – it’s flu season, which is always unpredictable.

“It’s not too late to get vaccinated. Flu vaccination is always the best way to prevent flu and its potentially serious complications.”

Weekly U.S. Influenza Surveillance Report

Some things to know to about this year’s flu season include that:

  • the most active flu B virus strains belong to a sublade that was not in the flu vaccine, but is similar enough that getting vaccinated should offer protection
  • again, it is never too late to get a flu vaccine. Remember, a yearly flu vaccine is recommended for everyone without a contraindication who is at least six months old, with younger children getting two doses during their first season.
  • anti-viral flu medications (Tamiflu, Relenza, and Xofluza) are available, but are mainly recommended for those who are at high risk for serious flu complications, including young children (under 2 to 5 years of age), pregnant women, seniors, and those with chronic medical conditions, like asthma and diabetes, etc.
  • most people do not need a flu test, as it is possible to have a negative flu test and still have the flu (false positive test) and most people don’t need to be treated with anti-viral flu medications
  • if you get the flu, avoid others and seek medical attention if you develop any serious, emergency warning signs, like trouble breathing, dehydration, or confusion, etc.
  • people with the flu can generally return to school or work once they are fever free for at least 24 hours

And let’s hope we don’t see any other surprises this year…

More on the The 2019-20 Flu Season Update

Getting Advice About Flu Vaccines

As flu season approaches, it seems like everyone wants to give you advice about flu vaccines.

How do you know who to listen to?

Getting Advice About Flu Vaccines

How do you know who’s advice to avoid?

Amanda Bitz wrote a popular post with some good advice.

The best advice about flu vaccines is going to include a recommendation to get vaccinated and protected.
You getting the flu shot, should be a thing.

Another nurse thought she could do a little better…

Exercising and drinking clean water isn't going to help you avoid getting the flu...
A healthy person can’t pass illness to anyone unless they get sick with the flu…

Nurse Sherri wasn’t the only one who felt the need to write a response after reading a post with advice about flu vaccines.

Great advice about flu vaccines!
XOXO – save each other – vaccinate!

Not surprisingly, anti-vax folks have not liked Beth Purkey’s post.

The holistic lioness is probably the worst person to go to for advice about flu vaccines.
XOXO – Save this generation, the next and the ones to follow – DON’T VACCINATE?

What can you see in their responses?

An anti-vaccine toxicologist is not someone you want to go to for advice about flu vaccines.
Herd immunity cannot be achieved by vaccines?

Mostly that they cherry pick a few case reports and studies that they think fit their narrative – that flu vaccines are dangerous, don’t work, and that getting the flu ain’t so bad.

And they top it off with a few conspiracy theories, stuff about shedding, and lots of talk about vaccine inserts.

So who do you want to get advice about flu vaccines from?

Who do you want taking care of you in the hospital if you are sick?

An anti-vaccine nurse is not a good person to go to for advice about flu vaccines.
Lindsey wasn’t trying to scare anyone, she was empowering them with facts so they could make a choice and feel LESS FEARFUL of naturally occurring pathogens that we live amongst all day, every day.

Folks trying to sell you stuff, from essential oils and CBD oil to misinformation about vaccines and the flu, or an “ACTUAL certified medical professional” who knows what they are talking about?

“The single best way to prevent seasonal flu is to get vaccinated each year, but good health habits like covering your cough and washing your hands often can help stop the spread of germs and prevent respiratory illnesses like the flu.”

Healthy Habits to Help Prevent Flu

How serious are you about wanting to avoid getting the flu and keeping your family healthy?

Have you gotten your flu shot yet?

Has your family?

More on Flu Vaccines

Updated Recommendations to Prevent and Control the Flu from the CDC

Every year, we get updated recommendations on how to best prevent and control the flu from the CDC and the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices.

Updated Recommendations to Prevent and Control the Flu from the CDC

Sometimes that means big changes, but often it doesn’t.

Updated Recommendations to Prevent and Control the Flu from the CDC

What about this year?

“This report includes no substantial changes from the 2018–19 recommendations.”

Prevention and Control of Seasonal Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices — United States, 2019–20 Influenza Season

No substantial changes. That makes it easy to report!

So as usual, everyone who is at least 6 months old without a contraindication should get a flu vaccine this year.

“Balancing considerations regarding the unpredictability of timing of onset of the influenza season and concerns that vaccine-induced immunity might wane over the course of a season, it is recommended that vaccination should be offered by the end of October.”

Prevention and Control of Seasonal Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices — United States, 2019–20 Influenza Season

And be sure your kids get vaccinated and protected before flu season starts.

What else is there to know about the upcoming, 2019-20 flu season?

  • flu vaccine is already becoming available in doctor’s offices, pharmacies, and clinics
  • despite some initial delays, up to 169 million doses of flu vaccine will be available for the 2019-20 flu season
  • FluMist will be in short supply this year, but it is available

Anyone have predictions for what kind of flu season we will have?

More on Recommendations to Prevent and Control the Flu