Tag: cold chain

Vaccine Movies and Videos

All of the attention that Robert De Niro gave the movie Vaxxed has many people realizing that there are anti-vaccine movies out there.

Promoted as documentaries, they mostly include the same anti-vaccine ‘experts’ that scare parents away from vaccinating their kids on the Internet.

These types of movies include:

  • Vaxxed
  • The Greater Good
  • Trace Amounts
  • Who Killed Alex Spourdalakis?
  • Bought
  • Man Made Epidemic
  • Sacrificial Virgins
  • The Truth About Vaccines

Most are propaganda, without even a trace amount of truth in them, and should not be used as a research tool to help you make a decision about vaccines.

Vaccine Movies and Documentaries

What about movies to actually help you get educated about vaccines?

Every Last Child takes a look at the fight to end polio in Pakistan.
Every Last Child takes a look at the fight to end polio in Pakistan.

Watch these movies and documentaries:

Have you seen or heard about any of these movies about vaccines?

Vaccine Videos

Just as bad as so-called vaccine documentaries, many of the vaccine videos that you find on You-Tube are also filled with misinformation and propaganda, including many vaccine scare videos.

Where are you Jon Stewart? Measles is still around...
Where are you Jon Stewart? Measles is still around…

Watch the following vaccines videos instead:

Still have questions?

More on Vaccine Movies and Videos

Updated February 28, 2019

Transporting Vaccines Safely

Need to move your vaccines from one place to another?

In Djibouti, vaccines were once transported using photovoltaic-powered refrigeration systems mounted on camels.
In Djibouti, vaccines were once transported using photovoltaic-powered refrigeration systems mounted on camels.

That might be more difficult than you think.

Transporting Vaccines Safely

Why would you need to move your vaccines?

Lots of reasons, including:

  • a temporary power outage
  • a vaccine clinic at an off-site location or clinic
  • to redistribute vaccines between clinics (should not be done routinely)
  • moving office locations

Why do you need to be careful when transporting your vaccines?

Because vaccines are very temperature sensitive and must be stored at the proper temperature. If your vaccines get too hot or too cold while being transported, then they likely won’t be effective anymore and will have to be replaced.

“The time needed to transport should be less than 8 hours and vaccine should be placed in a stable storage unit as quickly as possible .”

Vaccine Storage & Handling Toolkit

Fortunately, you can safely transport your vaccines if you plan ahead and have:

  • a hard sided coolor or styrofoam vaccine shipping container
  • conditioned frozen water bottles
  • insulating material
  • a temperature monitoring device

Except in emergency situations, you should also contact your VFC program before you transport vaccines to see if they have any specific instructions for you to follow.

What shouldn’t you do?

You should not use dry ice, attempt to transport multi-dose vials that have already been opened, or transport frozen and refrigerated vaccines in the same container.

And once transported, transfer the vaccines quickly to a new storage refrigerator or freezer, as appropriate, continuing to monitor and log temperatures.

What to Know About Transporting Vaccines

Be prepared before transporting your vaccines to another location so that they don’t get too hot or too cold.

More on Transporting Vaccines

Which Vaccines Need to be Refrigerated?

Vaccines have to be stored properly.

Mostly that means that they must be kept at a proper temperature, not getting too hot or too cold, “to protect quality and potency” of the vaccines.

While that can be a challenge in some parts of the world, as they go to great lengths to maintain the cold chain for vaccines, in developed countries, it typically means knowing whether to put the vaccine in the refrigerator or the freezer.

Even in the most industrialized city, a power failure can happen or someone can just unplug the refrigerator by mistake.

Which Vaccines Need to be Refrigerated?

Post a list on your refrigerator so that you don't put vaccines in the fridge that should be frozen.
Post a list on your refrigerator so that you don’t put vaccines in the fridge that should be frozen.

While some vaccines are stored frozen, most must be refrigerated.

Vaccines that are kept refrigerated should be stored in a vaccine refrigerator at a temperature between 36°F and 46°F (2°C and 8°C), with a target of 40°F (5°C).

Of available vaccines, those that must be refrigerated include:

  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hib
  • Gardasil9 (all HPV vaccines)
  • influenza (all flu vaccines)
  • IPV (polio)
  • Menactra, Menveo, Bexsera, Trunembra (Meningococcal)
  • MMR*
  • Prevnar 13, Pneumovax (Pneumococcal)
  • RotaTeq, RotaRix (Rotavirus)
  • Pentacel, Pediarix (all DTaP containing vaccines)
  • Tdap (Adacel and Boostrix)

*The MMR vaccine vaccine can be stored in a freezer or a refrigerator.

Making things a little more confusing, refrigerator stable versions of Varivax and ProQuad, which are usually stored frozen, are also available. They have a shelf life of 24 months when refrigerated, but may also be stored in a freezer.

What do you do if something goes wrong and your refrigerated vaccines have gotten too warm or too cold?

“If you find that a vaccine has been exposed to an inappropriate temperature, determine the reason for the temperature alteration, mark the vaccine “Do Not Use,” and contact the manufacturer or the state or local health department to determine if the vaccine can be used.”

Immunization Action Coalition on Ask the Experts about Vaccine Storage and Handling

Getting educated about proper vaccine storage and handling can avoid many incidents and help you be well prepared if something does go wrong. Once you are all set up and ready to store your vaccines, you just have to know where to put them.

What To Know About Storing Vaccines in a Refrigerator

Vaccines must be kept at a proper temperature, not getting too hot or too cold, “to protect quality and potency” of the vaccines.

More About Storing Vaccines in a Refrigerator

Which Vaccines Need to be Frozen?

Post a note on your vaccine freezer as a reminder about the proper place to store each vaccine.
Post a note on your vaccine freezer as a reminder about the proper place to store each vaccine.

Vaccines must be stored properly.

Mostly that means that they must be kept at a proper temperature, not getting too hot or too cold, “to protect quality and potency” of the vaccines.

While that can be a challenge in some parts of the world, as they go to great lengths to maintain the cold chain for vaccines, in developed countries, it typically means knowing whether to put the vaccine in the refrigerator or the freezer.

Unless of course something goes wrong…

Did your power go out?

Or did someone leave a freezer door open?

Maybe your older freezer just stopped working?

Or maybe someone just unplugged the freezer by mistake.

What do you do if something goes wrong and your frozen vaccines aren’t frozen anymore?

“If you find that a vaccine has been exposed to an inappropriate temperature, determine the reason for the temperature alteration, mark the vaccine “Do Not Use,” and contact the manufacturer or the state or local health department to determine if the vaccine can be used.”

Immunization Action Coalition on Ask the Experts about Vaccine Storage and Handling

Getting educated about proper vaccine storage and handling can avoid many incidents and help you be well prepared if something does go wrong. Once you are all set up and ready to store your vaccines, you just have to know where to put them.

Which Vaccines Need to be Frozen?

While most vaccines are refrigerated, some must be frozen.

Vaccines that are kept frozen should be stored in a freezer at a temperature of 5°F (-15°C) or colder.

Of available vaccines, only non-Refrigerator stable Varivax (chickenpox), non-Refrigerator stable ProQuad (the combo of Varicella and MMR or MMRV), and the shingles vaccine (Zostavax) must be frozen.

The MMR vaccine can be stored in either a freezer or a refrigerator.

The only time non-Refrigerator stable Varivax and non-Refrigerator stable ProQuad can be stored in a refrigerator (36° to 46°F, 2° to 8°C), is if you are going to reconstitute and use them within 72 hours. If the vaccines have been out of a freezer, and you don’t use them within 72 hours, then they must be discarded. You can’t put them back in the freezer.

Also, a reconstituted ProQuad vaccine can be stored at room temperature, protected from light, for up to 30 minutes. You must discard the vaccine if you don’t use it within that time though. It can’t be refrozen or refrigerated.

Making things a little more confusing, refrigerator stable versions of Varivax and ProQuad are also available. They have a shelf life of 24 months when refrigerated, but may also be stored in a  freezer.

What To Know About Storing Vaccines in a Freezer

Vaccines must be kept at a proper temperature, not getting too hot or too cold, “to protect quality and potency” of the vaccines.

More About Storing Vaccines in a Freezer

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