Tag: emergency

Standing Orders for Vaccination

Have you heard about standing orders for vaccination?

Anti-vax folks have become overt in how they are now all about conspiracy theories.
Anti-vax folks have become overt in how they are now all about conspiracy theories.

Guess what?

Standing orders does not mean “covert vaccination without consent.”

Standing Orders for Vaccination

For one thing, there is nothing covert about them.

In addition to the Take a Stand! website, the Immunization Action Coalition has hosted workshops all over the United States on using standing orders to increase vaccination rates.

And they aren’t about vaccinating people without their consent.

So what are standing orders for vaccination?

“Standing orders are written protocols approved by a physician or other authorized practitioner that allow qualified health care professionals (who are eligible to do so under state law, such as registered nurses or pharmacists) to assess the need for and administer vaccine to patients meeting certain criteria, such as age or underlying medical condition.”

10 Steps to Implementing Standing Orders for Immunization in Your Practice Setting

Again, that doesn’t mean you can skip getting informed consent before giving vaccines.

“Having standing orders in place streamlines your practice workflow by eliminating the need to obtain an individual physician’s order to vaccinate each patient.”

10 Steps to Implementing Standing Orders for Immunization in Your Practice Setting

All standing orders do is eliminate the need for doctors and other health care providers to assess and write orders for vaccines on each and every patient they see.

Instead, standing orders help delegate that part of the vaccination process to other qualified health care professionals to help make sure that “immunizations are available at all visits, sick or well, regular hours, or weekend clinics.”

Everything else is essentially the same.

Even with standing orders, you still have to get informed consent before giving a vaccine.
Even with standing orders, you still have to get informed consent before giving a vaccine.

The health care provider giving the vaccine still has to:

So what’s the benefit of standing orders?

It removes some of the barriers to getting vaccines, such as needing a well child checkup or physical exam, allowing for vaccination-only appointments.

“The Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF) recommends standing orders for vaccinations—when used alone or when combined with additional interventions—to increase vaccination rates among adults and children from different populations or settings.”

Vaccination Programs: Standing Orders

Standing orders also help make sure that you keep kids on schedule or get them caught up as health care providers automatically check their vaccination status at each and every visit to the office, even during sick visits.

For example, if you child comes in for an appointment in October with a mild ear infection or because they have a wart, a standing order for a flu vaccine can help make sure you child is vaccinated and protected before flu season starts.

Standing orders do not override laws requiring informed consent.
Standing orders do not override laws requiring informed consent and there is no single form that would give consent to all medical procedures.

It should be obvious that standing orders simply lead to fewer missed opportunities to be vaccinated and protected.

Not surprisingly, their source and evidence for forced vaccination is simply another anti-vaccine website...
Not surprisingly, their source and evidence for forced vaccination is simply another anti-vaccine website…

There is nothing covert about them.

“Consent is a communications process, not a form. The process provides an opportunity for the patient to understand the benefits, risks and alternatives to the treatment he or she is about to undergo, and for the physician to explain these in detail. Forms are used to document the process.”

Consents Policy

Not even in the way anti-vax are using them to try and scare you away from vaccinating and protecting your kids.

More on Standing Orders for Vaccination

Transporting Vaccines Safely

Need to move your vaccines from one place to another?

In Djibouti, vaccines were once transported using photovoltaic-powered refrigeration systems mounted on camels.
In Djibouti, vaccines were once transported using photovoltaic-powered refrigeration systems mounted on camels.

That might be more difficult than you think.

Transporting Vaccines Safely

Why would you need to move your vaccines?

Lots of reasons, including:

  • a temporary power outage
  • a vaccine clinic at an off-site location or clinic
  • to redistribute vaccines between clinics (should not be done routinely)
  • moving office locations

Why do you need to be careful when transporting your vaccines?

Because vaccines are very temperature sensitive and must be stored at the proper temperature. If your vaccines get too hot or too cold while being transported, then they likely won’t be effective anymore and will have to be replaced.

“The time needed to transport should be less than 8 hours and vaccine should be placed in a stable storage unit as quickly as possible .”

Vaccine Storage & Handling Toolkit

Fortunately, you can safely transport your vaccines if you plan ahead and have:

  • a hard sided coolor or styrofoam vaccine shipping container
  • conditioned frozen water bottles
  • insulating material
  • a temperature monitoring device

Except in emergency situations, you should also contact your VFC program before you transport vaccines to see if they have any specific instructions for you to follow.

What shouldn’t you do?

You should not use dry ice, attempt to transport multi-dose vials that have already been opened, or transport frozen and refrigerated vaccines in the same container.

And once transported, transfer the vaccines quickly to a new storage refrigerator or freezer, as appropriate, continuing to monitor and log temperatures.

What to Know About Transporting Vaccines

Be prepared before transporting your vaccines to another location so that they don’t get too hot or too cold.

More on Transporting Vaccines