Tag: pain relief

What Is a Hexavalent Vaccine?

Most folks know that we have combination vaccines that help reduce the number of injections that kids have to get at one visit.

You might not think of it as a combination vaccine, but one of the first, DPT, simply combines protection against diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus into one shot.

Of course, we have come a long way since the days when DPT and MMR were considered combination vaccines.

Wait, why aren’t they considered combination vaccines anymore?

It’s not part of any conspiracy. It’s simply because you can’t get their individual components separately anymore. There is no measles or rubella shots anymore. Just the MMR. There is no tetanus shot.

Combination Vaccines

Not surprisingly, it is now becoming routine for kids to get combination vaccines instead of separate shots.

That’s because while the great majority of us want our kids vaccinated and protected, few enjoy shots and needles.

“The use of licensed combination vaccines is preferred over separate injection of their equivalent component vaccines.”

AAP on Combination Vaccines for Childhood Immunization

Does this mean more vaccines at one visit?

Nope.

“So, at a doctor’s visit, your child may only get two or three shots to protect him from five diseases, instead of five individual shots. Fewer shots may mean less pain for your child and less stress for you.”

CDC on Combination Vaccines

It just means fewer injections.

Combination vaccines combine the vaccines that you are already getting into one injection.

What Is a Hexavalent Vaccine?

And they might get even fewer with the latest hexavalent vaccines (six-in-one).

This is the next step up from our current pentavelent vaccines (five-in-one), like Pediarix (combines DTaP, Hep B, and IPV) and Pentacel (combines DTaP, IPV, and Hib).

The hexavalent vaccines combine protection against diphtheria, tetanus, acellular pertussis, Haemophilus influenzae type B, poliovirus and hepatitis B (DTaP-Hib-IPV-HepB) into one injection.

Sounds good, right?

Although not approved in the United States, hexavalent vaccines, including Infanrix Hexa have been used in many other countries since 2000! Another, Hexavac was withdrawn from the market because of issues with waning hepatitis B antibody titers (kids had levels that were still protective, but were on the low side).

When will get a hexavalent vaccine in the United States?

Obviously, the early problems with Hexavac kept us from getting a hexavalent vaccine, at least before the next generation of vaccines was developed.

Hexavalent vaccines are widely available in most parents of the world.
Hexavalent vaccines are widely available in most parents of the world.

Two new hexavalent vaccines, Vaxelis and Hexyon, have recently been licensed in Europe, after many studies showed that they worked and were safe when given with all of the other vaccines on the schedule, including Prevnar, rotavirus, Men C, and MMRV.

And one of these might soon be coming to the United States.

Vaxelis

V419 (Vaxelis), which was developed in collaboration between Merck and Sanofi Pasteur, has been under review by the FDA since 2014 has already received a Complete Response Letter that was “deemed complete and acceptable for review.”

And it was approved by the FDA on December 21, 2018.

Remember, that could mean just two shots at infant well check ups, but continued protection against eight vaccine-preventable diseases, as they get a hexavalent vaccine, Prevnar and the rotavirus vaccine!

It may be at least another year before Vaxelis makes it way to your pediatrician’s office though.

More on the Hexavalent Vaccine

Flumist Is Not Just a Last Resort

The return of FluMist has hit a slight snag.

Most folks will remember that on February 12, 2017, at a meeting of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), members voted to once again recommended FluMist Quadrivalent to prevent the flu. So it will be available for this year’s flu season.

Many parents and pediatricians welcomed the news, as it meant that many kids could avoid getting a shot and could get the nasal spray flu vaccine instead.

Why did flu vaccine rates drop in younger school age kids when Flumist wasn't available?
Why did flu vaccine rates drop in younger school age kids when Flumist wasn’t available?

It was especially good news for those kids who skipped getting a flu vaccine because they didn’t want to get a shot when Flumist wasn’t available.

Flumist as a Last Resort?

So what’s the problem?

“The Academy recommends pediatricians give children inactivated influenza vaccine in the upcoming season and use live attenuated vaccine only as a last resort.”

American Academy of Pediatrics

Members of the AAP Committee on Infectious Diseases (COID) are concerned that FluMist, even after it has been changed to address previous issues, may not work as well as a standard flu shot.

“Influenza is unpredictable from year to year, so we really want to immunize as many kids as we can against the flu with what we think will be the most effective product. That’s why we’re recommending the flu shot this coming season.”

Henry H. Bernstein, D.O., M.H.C.M., FAAP

While many of us were surprised by the “last resort” phrasing from the AAP, maybe we shouldn’t have been.

In addition to being an ex officio member of the AAP Committee on Infectious Diseases (COID), Henry H. Bernstein was one of only two members of the ACIP who voted against bringing FluMist back, going against the opinion of twelve other members who voted in favor of FluMist.

Dr. Henry H. Bernstein is also the “leading voice on AAP’s annual policy statement on preventing flu in children with flu vaccines.”

“The data reviewed showed that receiving the nasal spray vaccine is better than not getting any vaccine at all,” said Flor Munoz, MD, FAAP, member of the AAP Committee on Infectious Diseases. “If you get the nasal spray vaccine, just be aware that, depending on the performance of the new vaccine formulation, there might be a chance you will not be fully protected against H1N1 strains of flu. The efficacy of this new formulation has not yet been determined.”

It is important to note that the AAP is not saying that Flumist won’t work though.

“The effectiveness of this new formulation of LAIV4 has not been confirmed, since A/H1N1 virus has not widely circulated recently.”

AAP influenza immunization recommendations revised for 2018-’19 season

They are basically saying that if the reformulated version of Flumist doesn’t work as it is predicted to work, then your kids might not be protected. They are concerned that we haven’t seen the new version of Flumist work in real world studies against the H1N1 strain of the flu.

Flumist Is Not Just a Last Resort

Fortunately, the AAP has somewhat rephrased their message about Flumist (LAIV4). While they still recommend that the inactivated influenza vaccine (flu shots) be the primary choice for children, they now say that:

“LAIV4 may be offered for children who would not otherwise receive an influenza vaccine (and for whom it is appropriate by age and health status).”

AAP influenza immunization recommendations revised for 2018-’19 season

Importantly though, parents and pediatricians should note that the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for the 2018–19 flu season very clearly make no preferential recommendation for the use of any influenza vaccine product over another.

“Following two seasons (2016–17 and 2017–18) during which ACIP recommended that LAIV4 not be used, for the 2018–19 season, vaccination providers may choose to administer any licensed, age-appropriate influenza vaccine (IIV, RIV4, or LAIV4). LAIV4 is an option for those for whom it is appropriate.”

Prevention and Control of Seasonal Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices—United States, 2018–19 Influenza Season

And the ACIP and CDC aren’t the only ones who disagree with the AAP’s decision.

“So I think the AAP was wrong, frankly, to say that FluMist should only be used as a last-resort vaccine for influenza. Rather, they should have gone along with what the ACIP said, which was that these vaccines can now be used interchangeably for persons aged 2-49 years.”

Paul Offit, MD on FluMist: Reasonable Vaccine Option or ‘Last Resort’ for the Upcoming Flu Season?

So what should you do?

If it is going to be a battle getting your kids a flu shot and you might you might have even skipped it the last few years because Flumist wasn’t available, then your choice is very clear.

Get vaccinated with Flumist, as long as your child is at least two years old and otherwise meets the requirements.

And don’t feel bad or worried that your decision is leaving your child unprotected. Remember that Flumist is recommended by the ACIP and CDC and has been used continuously in most other countries (under the name Fluenz).

Your next battle might simply be finding Flumist. Because of the AAP’s “last resort” comment, some pediatricians didn’t even bother ordering any doses.

More on the Latest Flumist Recommendations

Kids Getting Shots – Are You Prepared?

Most kids have a favorite cartoon or show that they like to watch.

When I was a kid, it was Sesame Street and Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.

Are You Prepared for Your Kids Getting Shots?

Although we often complain about kids overdoing it with screen time, there are some circumstances when a little screen time might be a good thing.

A little distraction helped Elmo get his shot.
A little distraction helped Elmo get his shot.

For example, if your kids are nervous about an upcoming visit to their pediatrician when they will get shots, having things explained by a well known character will almost certainly be helpful.

How else can you prepare your kids?

Remember to be honest. Don’t lie and say that they aren’t getting a shot or that it won’t hurt at all, only to have their pediatrician tell them that they need a vaccination during the visit.

Going to the Doctor.Books on going to the doctors can also be helpful. Many include a section or story on getting vaccines.

Going To The Doctor by T. Berry Brazelton, MD has always been a favorite of mine, but there are many others:

  • Leo Gets a Checkup
  • The Berenstain Bears Go to the Doctor
  • Corduroy Goes to the Doctor
  • Nicky Goes to the Doctor
  • Daniel Visits the Doctor
  • Froggy Goes to the Doctor
  • My Friend the Doctor
  • The Big Blue House Call

And have your kids play with a Doc McStuffins medical kit.

Vaccines are safe and necessary and you can help to make sure your kids are ready to get them at their next appointment.

More on Preparing Kids When Getting Shots

How to Breastfeed Your Child During Vaccinations

Can you breastfeed while your child is getting their vaccines?

Sure.

How to Breastfeed Your Child During Vaccinations

While the smallpox vaccine and yellow fever vaccine are contraindicated for moms who are breastfeeding, there are no contraindications on vaccinating kids while they are breastfeeding.

Why breastfeed while your kids are getting their vaccines?

While some moms just breastfeed immediately afterwards,  others understand that breastfeeding at the same time as the shots are being given can help decrease any pain associated with getting those vaccines even more.

“If you are breastfeeding, feed your baby before, during and after immunization. The physical closeness and familiar taste of breast milk will calm your baby. Breastfeeding during immunization is safe for babies, even newborns. There is no evidence that babies will choke or associate their mothers with pain.”

Tips For Parents For A Positive Immunization Experience

Will it make it harder for health professionals to hold your child while the shots are being given? Not usually, especially if you help hold your child.

But how can infants get the oral Rotavirus vaccine if they are breastfeeding?

In general, infants should get the least painful vaccine first. And oral vaccines are typically given before shots. So they can get their Rotavirus vaccine before you begin breastfeeding and get prepared for the rest of their vaccines.

The Be Sweet to Babies videos can help you see the benefits of breastfeeding while your kids get their vaccines.
The Be Sweet to Babies videos can help you see the benefits of breastfeeding while your kids get their vaccines.

And while it might depend on the age and size of your child, in general, to breastfeed your child while they are getting their vaccinations, once everything is prepared and ready, you should:

  • hold your child on your lap, understanding that until age three years, most shots will be given in your child’s thighs, although toddlers can sometimes get them in their arms
  • once you have your child well positioned, have a good latch and have started nursing, make sure your child’s arm or leg remains exposed (wherever the shot will be going) and help hold your child securely so that they don’t move while getting their vaccines. For example, you might hold an arm or leg with your free hand and anchor their legs between your thighs or your other hand if possible
  • continue nursing after your child has gotten their vaccines, keeping in mind that you may have to switch positions if they are getting multiple shots

Also understand that it might not always be a good idea to nurse while getting vaccines. Is your baby a distracted eater? Is it going to be hard to hold your child while they are nursing and getting their shots? Does your health care provider not have experience giving vaccines to a child while they are breastfeeding? Does your health care provider have a lot of experience giving vaccines, and they think that giving them while you are nursing will just make the whole process take a lot longer?

“Breastfeeding moms may wish to breastfeed baby during vaccination or immediately after to lessen pain and stress.”

AAP on How can I comfort my baby during vaccinations?

In general though, especially as it is recommended by the WHO and the AAP, consider breastfeeding your child while they are getting their vaccines.

More On Breastfeeding Your Child During Vaccinations