Available Vaccines

In the United States, children routinely get 13 vaccines that protect them against 16 vaccine-preventable diseases including diphtheria, chicken pox, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, Hib, HPV, influenza, measles, meningococcal disease,  mumps, pertussis, pneumococcal disease, polio,  rotavirus, rubella, and tetanus.

Routine Vaccines

These 13 routine childhood vaccines include:

  1. DTaP vaccines (Daptacel or Infanrix) – 5 doses
  2. chicken pox vaccine (Varivax) – 2 doses
  3. hepatitis A vaccines (Havrix or Vaqta) – 2 doses
  4. hepatitis B vaccine (Engerix-B or Recombivax HB) – 3 doses
  5. Hib vaccine (ActHIB, PedvaxHIB, Hiberix) – 3 to 4 doses
  6. HPV vaccines (Cervarix or Gardasil) – 3 doses
  7. Influenza – a yearly flu shot
  8. MMR II – 2 doses
  9. Meningococcal vaccines (Menactra or Menveo) – 2 doses
  10. Pneumococcal vaccines (Prevnar 13 and Pneumovax 23) – 4 doses/1 dose
  11. Polio vaccine – 4 doses
  12. Rotavirus vaccines (Rotarix or RotaTeq) – 2 to 3 doses
  13. Tdap booster (Adacel, Boostrix) – 1 dose

Another vaccine or meningococcal B disease (Bexsero or  Trumenba), which is given as 2 or 3 doses to older teens, is not exactly routine yet. It has a “permissive” recommendation in that parents are told they can get it if they want their kids to avoid menB infections, but it is not required yet.

MenHibrix is yet another vaccine, a combination between Hib Meningococcal Groups C and Y, but it is only given to high risk kids.

Combination Vaccines

The availability of combination vaccines also means that your child doesn’t necessarily need to get as many shots as you see doses. For example, Pediarix combines the three vaccines, DTaP-IPV-HepB, into a single shot. Given three times, when your infant is two, four, and six months, that means that instead of nine shots, your child only gets three.

Other combination vaccines include:

  • Pentacel – DTaP-IPV-Hib
  • Kinrix – DTaP-IPV
  • Quadracel – DTaP-IPV
  • ProQuad – MMR-Varivax

Using combination vaccines, your fully vaccinated and protected child might only get 18 shots by the time he starts kindergarten, not counting yearly flu shots.

Other Vaccines

In addition to the 13 routine vaccines that children get, other vaccines that might be given in special situations include the:

That there are so many vaccines that are not routinely given to kids should dispel the myth that pediatricians are simply vaccine pushers. After all, why don’t they push these vaccines then?

For More Information On Vaccines:

Updated April 26, 2017

20 thoughts on “Available Vaccines

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s