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Are COVID Vaccines Contaminating Our Blood Supply?

Why do some people think that COVID vaccines are contaminating our blood supply?

Sherri Tenpenny is one of the folks pushing the idea that COVID vaccines are contaminating our blood supply.
Sherri Tenpenny is one of the folks pushing the idea that COVID vaccines are contaminating our blood supply.

The usual suspects…

Are COVID Vaccines Contaminating Our Blood Supply?

Of course, this conspiracy theory makes as much sense as their ideas of COVID vaccine shedding, nanobots, and COVID vaccines turning us into EMF transmitters…

“There is no deferral time for eligible blood donors who have received a COVID-19 vaccine currently authorized in the U.S. including J&J, Moderna and Pfizer.”

What you need to know about COVID-19 vaccines and blood donation eligibility

In addition to the fact that you can donate blood after getting vaccinated and protected with a COVID vaccine, that blood is safe for you to receive if you need it.

Should you be worried that you might get some COVID vaccine mRNA or spike proteins if you got blood from someone who just got a Pfizer or Moderna COVID vaccine?

mRNA vaccines do not work and trigger the production of spike proteins and antibodies in your blood.
mRNA vaccines do not work and trigger the production of spike proteins and antibodies in your blood.

Of course not, after all, the mRNA doesn’t end up in your blood!

Where does it go?

It is taken up into the muscle cells where the vaccine was injected.

They then make spike proteins, after which these cells are taken to regional lymph nodes where spike protein antibodies are produced.

Could some of those spike proteins get into your blood?

One very small study has actually detected spike proteins, or parts of spike proteins – the S1 antigen, in the serum of folks who were recently vaccinated for a few weeks, but only at extremely small levels. Actual spike proteins were detected in even fewer of the study participants – just three of them.

And keep in mind that the levels they detected were very, very small.

Picogram small.

“S1 antigen was detected as early as day one post vaccination and peak levels were detected on average five days after the first injection (Figure 1A). The mean S1 peak levels was 68 pg/mL ±21 pg/mL. S1 in all participants declined and became undetectable by day 14.”

Circulating SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Antigen Detected in the Plasma of mRNA-1273 Vaccine Recipients

How small is a picogram (pg)?

It is one-trillionth of a gram!

“After the second vaccine dose, no S1 or spike was detectable, and both antigens remained undetectable through day 56.”

Circulating SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine Antigen Detected in the Plasma of mRNA-1273 Vaccine Recipients

Interestingly, the same study did not detect any S1 or spike protein in the serum of these folks after the second dose.

Does it matter though? After all, blood is processed after it is donated!

This includes whole blood donations that end up getting spun in centrifuges to separate it into transfusable components: red cells, platelets, and plasma. Components that are then further processed – plasma into cryoprecipitate and white cells are removed (leukoreduced) from red cells and platelets.

What about antibodies?

No, you would not lose immunity if you donated blood, but neither would you gain any immunity if you received blood from someone who was recently vaccinated.

But don’t we sometimes get injections of antibodies to keep us from getting an infection? Sure, but these injections or infusions of IVIG come from multiple donors.

“Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is a blood product prepared from the serum of between 1000 and 15,000 donors per batch.”

Clinical uses of intravenous immunoglobulin

Think about it… If it takes 1,000 to 15,000 donors to create one dose of IVIG, how many antibodies could really be in one pint of blood that you donate or receive?

Other things to know about COVID vaccines and our blood supply:

  • Yes, it is safe to donate and receive blood during the pandemic.
  • No, you can’t test positive for COVID after getting a blood donation, unless of course, you were positive before the blood donation.
  • No, donating blood after getting a COVID vaccine won’t reduce your immunity.
  • No, you won’t become immune to COVID after receiving blood from someone who had a COVID vaccine.

Most importantly, don’t let anyone scare you away from donating or receiving blood or getting vaccinated and protected against COVID.

All are safe!

COVID Vaccines Contaminating Our Blood Supply Fact Check

COVID vaccines are not contaminating our blood supply.

Donate blood if you can.

More on Donating Blood

1 thought on “Are COVID Vaccines Contaminating Our Blood Supply?”

  1. LIARS! It’s already been proven that the vaccine Mrna end up in the bloodstream! The blood bank is contaminated and you fools are simply not smart enough to see it or you are paid to lie. Which one is it?

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